You are here

Using Online Tools to Teach Classics in a Small or Non-Existent Classics Program

Kristina Chew

The Internet offers many tools, from online texts to scholarly resources to technologies making

it possible to communicate with -- and teach -- students who are thousands of miles away,

to enhance the teaching of Classics. Classicists at colleges and universities with very small

programs, or without a Classics program at all, can especially benefit from these. Classicists such

as Barbara McManus and Carl Rubenstein have shown just a few of the ways Internet resources

can be used to promote the study of the ancient world. They and more than a few other scholars

have also expressed reservations about over-reliance on e-learning, citing concerns about

academic integrity, practical issues such as how to evaluate students, and reduced opportunities

for interaction (Guerlac, O’Donnell). As the sole classicist at two smaller universities, and as

an online instructor for a variety of Classics courses, I have very much relied on the creative

use of Internet resources to provide students with a well-rounded foundation in Classics. Online

tools such as those designed by Google can be adapted to provide students with as personalized

and attentive a learning experience as possible in online courses on topics ranging from Latin

to Medical Terminology. The ready availability of resources about the ancient world, Latin and

ancient Greek on the Internet can be of use in developing lessons about ancient history, culture

and literature for community college courses, to bring Classics to a wider audience of students.

I will discuss specific strategies to (1) use Google Tools to facilitate online instruction and

(2) infuse Classics into community college writing and reading courses, as examples of how,

even in the absence of an official Classics program, the teaching of the ancient world can be

accomplished.

Session/Panel Title:

Digital Resources for Teaching and Outreach

Session/Paper Number

39.2

Share This Page

© 2019, Society for Classical Studies Privacy Policy