SCS Blog

11/20/2017Emma Vanderpool
The pitfalls facing intermediate Latin students as they move from a basic knowledge of forms and the simplified Latin of textbooks to actually reading Latin are well-known. It’s not just the artful word order or sophisticated grammar of classical texts. As Kenneth Kitchell emphasized in a well-known article (Kitchell 2000), the geographical and cultural knowledge required can baffle even the student well trained in verb forms, case usage, and syntax. Then there is the well-known tendency of students themselves to ignore low-hanging fruit, to spurn the solicitously extended helping hand in...
11/13/2017Kenneth Mayer
New ideas customarily enter the classroom in a kind of scholarly trickle-down, from the university to daily educational practice. Think of the New Criticism of the 1950s, social history, or backward design. The phenomenon in Latin versification known as the “golden line” represents a striking example of the reverse: an idea generated in the classroom and resisted by the academy for decades, if not centuries, before becoming mainstream in erudite classical scholarship. The term is first attested in 1612. The earliest citations follow a clear and consistent definition: two adjectives and two...
11/06/2017Elizabeth Bobrick
This article was originally published in Amphora 11.1. It has been edited slightly to adhere to current SCS blog conventions. At the entrance of the maximum security prison where I taught Greek tragedy was a wooden plaque in the shape of a shield. It was emblazoned with a motto: Non sum qualis eram. Apart from its incongruity in this place of no Latin and less Greek, the motto struck me as equally a declaration of failure and of hope. The men inside were not what they once were. What were they now? I knew very little about my students at Cheshire Correctional Institute. I’d...
10/30/2017Jane Millar
On a summer night in 64 CE a conflagration that would be remembered as the Great Fire of Rome began somewhere in the tightly-packed shops and streets around the Circus Maximus. “A disaster,” the historian Tacitus called it, “graver and more dreadful than all that have befallen this city by the violence of fire” (Annals 15.38). His account goes on to describe panic and destruction, followed by rumors, resentment, and rebuilding. Ancient responses to disasters like these are the focus of a new first-year studies course at the University of Texas at Austin, for which I am the teaching...
10/23/2017Wei Zhang
Ovid’s Metamorphoses has fared better than other Latin epic poems in modern Chinese reception. It has been rendered into Chinese twice: first, selected parts (about three-fifths) were translated in the 1950s by the renowned scholar of English literature, Yang Zhouhan (1915–1989), who supplemented the rest and published the complete translation in 1984; second, a Taiwanese man of letters, Lü Jianzhong, published a version of the entire epic in 2008. Each translation has its own merits: Yang’s version reads fluently and his style is natural, with tinges of archaic feeling, aimed at easy and...
10/16/2017Rebecca Benefiel
Roman Inscriptions of Britain is a digitally-enhanced version of R.G. Collingwood and R.P. Wright’s Roman Inscriptions of Britain, vol. 1 (1965), and its 2,400 inscriptions. It includes all subsequent Addenda and Corrigenda to volume 1. Volumes 2 (1990–1995, instrumentum domesticum) and 3 (2009, more recent finds) are not yet available online, but all the major Roman inscriptions of Britain are included here. Since the work of editing, preparing, and composing commentary for the inscriptions had already been done, the site’s creator, Scott Vanderbilt, could focus the interface, and on...
10/09/2017Mira Seo
August 2012: a Latinist, a scholar of Chinese martial arts novels, a classical Persianist, a historian of early Vietnam, a Renaissance literature scholar, an archaeologist of pre-modern Malaya, and a post-colonial literature specialist assembled in New Haven. It was just like a gathering of Marvel’s AvengersTM, but with less spandex. We gathered not to save the world, but to read it: in their Olympian wisdom (to mix mythological universes), President Richard Levin of Yale University and President Tan Chorh Chuan of National University of Singapore had decided to establish Yale-NUS College,...
10/02/2017Julie Langford
This article was originally published in Amphora 11.1. It has been edited slightly to adhere to current SCS blog conventions. That sinking feeling when you realize you’ve completely underestimated the scope of a project? I’m far more familiar with it than I’d like to admit. It was what I felt when I began analyzing the data I gathered in the library and vaults of the American Numismatic Society on provincial coinage minted under the Severan dynasty. I’d received a grant from my home institution to place the images and legends on provincial coinage in conversation with that of...
09/25/2017Philip Sapirstein
A Mid-Republican House at Gabii is an ambitious project. It extends the born-digital movement in archaeology, in that the final publication of an excavation is a website with an ISBN and long-term hosting by the University of Michigan. In addition to a traditional presentation of the finds, the publication includes the full excavation database disseminated through the Archaeological Recording Kit (ARK). The resource also presents the architectural remains and contexts in an interactive 3-D environment, coded using the gaming platform Unity. The latter two components of this forward-looking...
09/18/2017Patrick Hogan
Intermediate Latin students typically encounter Latin poetry for the first time with Vergil’s Aeneid. After a brief tutorial on the rules and patterns of dactylic hexameter, they plunge in with arma virumque cano. They learn scansion not only for the sake of tradition and proper understanding of the poem, but also so that they can appreciate its rhythms and artistry—the same reasons English teachers have for teaching their students iambic pentameter for Shakespeare. The symphony of “longs and shorts” can seem forbidding to students at first, and the remedy for this is most often simply...

Pages

Subscribe to SCS Blog Feed

SCS Bloggers

Ken Mayer is Director of Distance Learning at Capitol...
Elizabeth Bobrick has taught at the University of...
Jane Millar is a graduate student and teaching assistant...
Mira Seo joined Yale-NUS College as an inaugural faculty...
Philip Sapirstein is Assistant Professor of Art History...
A graduate of the PhD program in Classical Studies at the...
Carole Raddato is a history enthusiast and maintains the...
Christopher Nappa is Associate Professor and Director of...
Geoffrey Steadman teaches Latin in Cincinnati, Ohio. His...
Alan Sheppard is an independent scholar. His research...
Alison Innes (MA) is a podcaster and social media...
Gregory Crane is Winnick Family Chair of Technology and...
Victoria Pagán is Professor of Classics and affiliate of...
Thomas D. Kohn is associate professor of classical...
Sebastian Heath holds an A.B. from Brown University in...
William Duffy is Faculty Fellow in Faculty Development at...
Gabriel Moss is a Ph.D. Candidate in Ancient History at...
Mike Fontaine teaches Latin at Cornell University, where...
Dr. Garret FitzGerald is the McNeil Professor in...
Ben Gracy is Professor of Humanities at Polk State...
Sarah Bond is an assistant professor of Classics at the...
CPT Antonio Salinas is from Allen Park, Michigan. After...
Hamish Cameron is a Lecturer in Classical and Medieval...
Marie-Claire Beaulieu is Associate Professor of Classics...
Tyler received his B.S. in Secondary Education, Classical...
Randall Childree is Associate Professor of Classics at...
Scott Lawin Arcenas is a doctoral candidate in the...
Rebecca Benefiel is Associate Professor of Classics at...
Sarah Murray is Assistant Professor of Classics and...
Jacqueline DiBiasie Sammons is a Visiting Assistant...
Helen Cullyer is the Executive Director of SCS. She...
Nigel Nicholson is the Walter Mintz Professor of Classics...
Robert Gorman is Associate Professor of Classics and...
Christopher Francese is Asbury J. Clarke Professor of...
Laura Gawlinski is Associate Professor and Chair of...
Professor Coleman is the James Loeb Professor in Classics...
Scott Farrington is an Assistant Professor of Classical...
Rhodora G. Vennarucci is Assistant Professor of Classics...
Ellen Bauerle is executive editor and senior acquisitions...
Peter Anderson is Associate Professor and Chair of...
T. H. M. Gellar-Goad is Assistant Professor of Classical...
Matthew P. Loar is Assistant Professor of Classics and...
Mary Pendergraft is Chair of the Department of Classical...
Mike Lippman is an Assistant Professor of the Practice at...
Joel Christensen is Associate Professor of Classical...

Share This Page

© 2017, Society for Classical Studies Privacy Policy