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Matthew Loar

Matthew P. Loar's picture
Matthew P. Loar is an Assistant Professor of Classics at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln. His primary research focus is Rome’s transition from Republic to Empire, and especially the ways that literature of this period invoked and manipulated myth in an attempt to navigate and normalize this transition. He is the co-editor of Rome, Empire of Plunder: The Dynamics of Cultural Appropriation (CUP, 2017), and his work has also appeared in Classical Philology and Classical World.

All Posts By Matthew Loar

11/15/2018Matthew Loar
At last year’s SCS annual meeting in Boston, the Program Committee sponsored a panel called “Rhetoric: Then and Now.” Among the speakers constituting that panel was Princeton University Professor Dan-el Padilla Peralta, who, in lamenting the “inadequacy” and “meagerness” of a number of recent efforts in the field to diversify and expand access, delivered the following provocation: “perhaps it is time for this contemporary configuration of Classics to die so that it might be born into a new life.” In response to Padilla Peralta’s provocation, I cheekily stood up and asked him where Classics...
08/29/2018Matthew Loar
With the thermometer outside registering a frigid 29 degrees Fahrenheit at 7am on Thursday, April 19, 2018, a cohort of undergraduate Classics students at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln (UNL) launched their Homerathon: a marathon reading of Stanley Lombardo’s translation of Homer’s Iliad, which ran non-stop until 3am the next morning. The event taught students and listeners a lot about the difficulties and benefits of the ancient tradition of oral poetry—but brought Classics back out into the public sphere and made an argument for its relevance today. Unlike some other...
04/17/2017Matthew Loar
The online Packard Humanities Institute’s Classical Latin Texts (PHI) makes freely available material that was originally included on the PHI’s CD ROM 5.3, issued in 1991. It contains the vast majority of Latin literary texts written before 200 CE, as well as a handful of Latin texts from late antiquity. It therefore offers an alternative to two other free online resources: The Latin Library and the Perseus Project. The former has already been reviewed for  this blog by Ted Gellar-Goad, and some of his criticisms of it apply equally to PHI. In particular, due partly to copyright issues...

Recent Posts

11/15/2018Matthew Loar
At last year’s SCS annual meeting in Boston, the Program Committee sponsored a panel called “Rhetoric: Then and...
11/09/2018
As one of the cornerstones upon which Classical scholarship has been built, much has already been said about...
11/01/2018Lisl Walsh
As Benjamin Isaac concisely stated in a 2016 piece in Eidolon,[i] the “pseudo-scientific roots” of American racism...
10/25/2018Willeon Slenders
Logeion allows searches of a series of Greek and Latin dictionaries and classical reference works. It was...
10/14/2018Charles Hedrick
EAGLE, the Electronic Archive of Greek and Latin Epigraphy, was conceived in 1997 by the Italian Epigrapher Silvio...
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