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T. Gellar-Goad

T. H. M. Gellar-Goad's picture
T. H. M. Gellar-Goad is Assistant Professor of Classical Languages at Wake Forest University. He specializes in Latin poetry, especially the funny stuff: Roman comedy, Roman erotic elegy, Roman satire, and — if you believe him — the allegedly philosophical poet Lucretius. He's also one of "those gaming people" in Classics pedagogy. He can be contacted at thmgg@wfu.edu.

All Posts By T. Gellar-Goad

04/22/2019T. Gellar-Goad
by T. H. M. Gellar-Goad and Christopher B. Polt In this post, Profs. Gellar-Goad and Polt clarify their position in the debate over holding the annual CAMWS meeting at BYU for the 2023 annual meeting and why they view BYU as an unsafe conference site for LGTBQ+ classicists. On Saturday, April 20, the Classical Association of the Middle West and South (CAMWS) rescinded its earlier decision to hold part of its annual meeting on the campus of Brigham Young University (BYU) during its 2023 conference in Provo, Utah. CAMWS leadership had selected Brigham Young University (BYU) to host its...
12/26/2016T. Gellar-Goad
If you’ve studied or taught Latin in the last decade or so, you’ve probably used or at least encountered The Latin Library, administered by William L. Carey, Adjunct Professor of Latin and Roman Law at George Mason University. It’s a simple, free, HTML-based site with a huge collection of Latin texts spanning the longue durée of Latin literature. The purpose of the site is to offer digital texts “for ease of on-line reading or for downloading for personal or educational use” ( see “About These Texts”). You won’t find critical texts, apparatus, commentary, or grammatical reading aids;...
07/30/2015T. Gellar-Goad
This month’s column is the final in my series about how we can apply and see in action the 7 principles of research-based pedagogy described in the excellent book How Learning Works, by Susan Ambrose, et al.  Last time was metacognition.  Before that came mastery, prior knowledge, practice and feedback, motivation, and knowledge organization.  This month’s topic: student development and course climate, ch. 6 of the book.   Central to good pedagogy is the maxim that we teach not only content but also people.  Our students will not learn effectively if they are...
06/30/2015T. Gellar-Goad
One of my favorite pieces of Greek lyric poetry is the short “Pleiades poem,” fr. adesp. 976, consisting of four gorgeous lines attributed to Sappho by David Campbell and others (at least as far back as 1882, in Bergk’s edition, which numbers it Sappho fr. 52): δέδυκε μὲν ἀ σελάννα καὶ Πληΐαδες, μέσαι δέ νύκτες, πάρα δ’ ἔρχετ’ ὤρα, ἔγω δὲ μόνα κατεύδω the moon’s disappeared above me the Pleiades, too, have vanished midnight, and the hours pass by and still do I sleep alone (my translation; compare Wharton’s 1887 translation) I’d like to suggest that Elizabeth Bishop (1911–...
05/31/2015T. Gellar-Goad
In March’s column, I examined the pattern I term “sinister adaptation” in Fifty Shades of Grey, The Hunger Games, and Game of Thrones: the cinematic or television adaptation exaggerates violence against women present in the source-text or adds in violence that was not previously there.  Today, I contrast these examples (and one more American film) with Terentian comedy and Senecan tragedy.   My final Anglo-American example of sinister adaptation is a film drawing upon Graeco-Roman antiquity, 300: Rise of an Empire.  This film — a sequel to 300 (which was based on Frank...
04/30/2015T. Gellar-Goad
This month’s column is the penultimate in a series I’m posting every other month about how we can apply and see in action the 7 principles of research-based pedagogy described in the excellent book How Learning Works, by Susan Ambrose, et al.  Last time was mastery.  Before that came prior knowledge, practice and feedback, motivation, and knowledge organization.  This month’s topic: metacognition, ch. 7 of the book.   As the term draws to a close (for those of us on the semester system, at least), I find myself naturally feeling more reflective, thinking back on the...
03/31/2015T. Gellar-Goad
I have noticed a troubling pattern in some recent English-language cinematic and television productions that adapt written texts.  In these adaptations, the movie or TV show changes its source material in order to heighten the violence against women depicted in the original or to add in such violence not previously present.  In my view, each of the works that fit this pattern (including Fifty Shades of Grey, The Hunger Games, Game of Thrones, and 300: Rise of an Empire — spoiler alert!) do so not for the purposes of genuine social critique or commentary but for mere...
02/01/2015T. Gellar-Goad
This month’s column is the fifth part in a series I’m posting every other month about how we can apply and see in action the 7 principles of research-based pedagogy described in the excellent book How Learning Works, by Susan Ambrose, et al.  Last time was prior knowledge.  Before that came practice and feedback, motivation, and knowledge organization.  This month’s topic: mastery, ch. 4 of the book.   When faced with a practice sentence from the last chapter of an elementary Greek or Latin textbook, an expert classicist is generally able to comprehend or translate it...
01/05/2015T. Gellar-Goad
In November’s column, I evaluated how the Roman comedy of Plautus and Terence bears out, mutatis mutandis, Harriet Jacobs’ claim in Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl that American slavery “makes the white fathers cruel and sensual; the sons violent and licentious; it contaminates the daughters, and makes the wives wretched.”  In this month’s column I trace the path from slavery through citizen cruelty and licentiousness to the central problem of the genre’s plots, the rape of unwed citizen girls.   When viewed through the lens of Jacobs’ assertions about the corrupting...
12/11/2014T. Gellar-Goad
This month’s column is the fourth part in a series I’m posting every other month or so about how we can apply and see in action the 7 principles of research-based pedagogy described in the excellent book How Learning Works, by Susan Ambrose, et al.  Last time was practice and feedback.  Before that came motivation and knowledge organization.  This month’s topic: students’ prior knowledge, ch. 1 of the book.   The lesson from the first chapter of How Learning Works is simple and seemingly self-evident: “[s]tudents’ prior knowledge can help or hinder learning” (p. 13)....

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04/22/2019T. Gellar-Goad
by T. H. M. Gellar-Goad and Christopher B. Polt In this post, Profs. Gellar-Goad and Polt clarify their position...
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