SCS Blog

T. Gellar-Goad

T. H. M. Gellar-Goad's picture
T. H. M. Gellar-Goad is Assistant Professor of Classical Languages at Wake Forest University. He specializes in Latin poetry, especially the funny stuff: Roman comedy, Roman erotic elegy, Roman satire, and — if you believe him — the allegedly philosophical poet Lucretius. He's also one of "those gaming people" in Classics pedagogy. He can be contacted at thmgg@wfu.edu.

All Posts By T. Gellar-Goad

10/31/2014T. Gellar-Goad
This month’s column is the third part in a series I’m posting every other month or so about how we can apply and see in action the 7 principles of research-based pedagogy described in the excellent book How Learning Works, by Susan Ambrose, et al.  Last time was motivation, and before that was knowledge organization.  This month’s topic: practice and feedback, ch. 5 of the book.   Language acquisition is a hard task, particularly when the language is, like Latin and ancient Greek, inflected, culturally distant, and highly literary.  Learning a foreign language demands...
09/25/2014T. Gellar-Goad
In July’s column, I drew out some thematic similarities between the January 2014 movie The Legendary Hercules starring Kellan Lutz and the July 2014 movie Hercules (henceforth “Rockules”) starring Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson.  In this month’s column, I discuss Rockules as an adaptation of Steve Moore’s Hercules: The Thracian Wars comic books.   In Rockules, the climactic scene — in which Hercules, chained to two pillars, breaks free while screaming “I am Hercules!” — is taken almost directly from the Steve Moore-authored Radical Comics miniseries of which the film is an adaptation...
08/11/2014T. Gellar-Goad
This month’s column is the second part in a series I’ll post every other month or so about how we can apply and see in action the 7 principles of research-based pedagogy described in the excellent book How Learning Works, by Susan Ambrose, et al.  Last time was knowledge organization.  This month’s topic: motivating students, ch. 3 of the book.   Latin and Greek are hard languages to study.  Declension, conjugation, rules for subordination, derivation of verbal forms, particles, and vocabulary all require extensive memorization, practice, and integration.  The...
07/31/2014T. Gellar-Goad
This year’s been a productive one for big-budget hack-and-slash films set in the ancient world.  Besides a disastrous (so to speak) Pompeii and the 300 sequel focused on Themistocles and Artemisia, theatergoers have had the opportunity (some might say the misfortune) to see two movies about Hercules: The Legendary Hercules, starring Kellan Lutz, released in January, and Hercules, starring Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, released this month.  (For convenience, and for love of portmanteaux, I’ll refer to the latter as Rockules and the former as Herculutz.  Also for convenience, I’m...
06/25/2014T. Gellar-Goad
This month’s column is the first part in a series I’ll post every other month or so about how we can apply and see in action the 7 principles of research-based pedagogy described in the excellent book How Learning Works, by Susan Ambrose, et al.  This month’s topic: knowledge organization, ch. 2 of the book. Experts and novices mentally organize their knowledge in profoundly different ways.  By and large, even when we as students or teachers explicitly discuss and consciously implement knowledge acquisition processes — like flashcards, or declension drills — our mental...
05/20/2014T. Gellar-Goad
Harriet Jacobs, born in Edenton, North Carolina, in 1813, was the first formerly enslaved woman to write a narrative of freedom: Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, Written by Herself, first published in 1861, now widely recognized as a masterpiece and a seminal part of the genre of 19th-century African American narratives of freedom.  Incidents pseudonymously details Jacobs’ early life in slavery, her exposure to grievous harm and sexual violence at the hands of a cruel master, her marriage to and bearing of children by a different white man, her efforts to get her children out of...
04/15/2014T. Gellar-Goad
This month’s column is adapted from a paper I gave at the invitation of the Graduate Student Issues Committee at the CAMWS meeting in Waco earlier this month.   The humanities are a field in crisis because the number of students pursuing liberal-arts degrees has plummeted over the past couple decades.  Classics is producing more Ph.D.s than the discipline can support.  Online education will be the death of us all. Sound familiar?  Well, most of that’s bull.  The decrease in liberal-arts majors was caused by opening non-humanities fields like...
03/14/2014T. Gellar-Goad
It seems to be, first of all, from what I understand from doctors, it’s really rare. If it’s a legitimate rape, the female body has ways to try to shut the whole thing down. So ended Missouri Republican Todd Akin’s chances of unseating Democratic Senator Claire McCaskill in the 2012 U.S. election.  Discussing pregnancy resulting from rape (timeline of the comments here), Akin was defending his belief that anti-abortion laws shouldn’t include exemptions for victims of rape.  Akin’s words are a now-classic example of a “Kinsley gaffe,” when a politician slips up and says what...
02/17/2014T. Gellar-Goad
Greek Myth is one of the standbys of Classics general-education courses at colleges and universities across the United States.  These courses often have high enrollments and are populated by students with little prior knowledge about the ancient Mediterranean world who are taking the course to fulfill a degree requirement.  They may take Myth because of a lifelong interest in the stories (or because they’ve read the Percy Jackson series), they may be inspired to major in Classics by the course, or they may never read or think about Graeco-Roman culture after the term ends. A...
01/10/2014T. Gellar-Goad
In last month’s column, I offered an overview of the Greek myth of the Titanomachy, the war between the Olympian gods (Zeus, Hera, and all the rest) and the earlier generation, the Titans; and I discussed some recent media telling of the escape of the Titans from their underworld prison and a second Titanomachy: in Disney’s 1997 Hercules, in the 1998 straight-to-video Hercules and Xena animated movie, in the 2012 movie Wrath of the Titans (sequel to the remake of Clash of the Titans), in the 2013 movie Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters, in the 2011 movie Immortals, and in the video game series...

Pages

Recent Posts

11/15/2018Matthew Loar
At last year’s SCS annual meeting in Boston, the Program Committee sponsored a panel called “Rhetoric: Then and...
11/09/2018
As one of the cornerstones upon which Classical scholarship has been built, much has already been said about...
11/01/2018Lisl Walsh
As Benjamin Isaac concisely stated in a 2016 piece in Eidolon,[i] the “pseudo-scientific roots” of American racism...
10/25/2018Willeon Slenders
Logeion allows searches of a series of Greek and Latin dictionaries and classical reference works. It was...
10/14/2018Charles Hedrick
EAGLE, the Electronic Archive of Greek and Latin Epigraphy, was conceived in 1997 by the Italian Epigrapher Silvio...
Subscribe to SCS Blog Feed

SCS Bloggers

Caitlin Marley's picture
Caitlin A. Marley is a Visiting Assistant Professor in...
Peter Anderson's picture
Peter Anderson is a Professor of Classics at Grand Valley...
Scott Lawin Arcenas's picture
Scott Lawin Arcenas is a doctoral candidate in the...
bagnall's picture
Roger Bagnall is Emeritus Professor of Ancient History...
Andaleeb Badiee Banta's picture
Andaleeb Badiee Banta has been Curator of European and...
Ellen Bauerle is executive editor and senior acquisitions...
Marie-Claire Beaulieu's picture
Marie-Claire Beaulieu is Associate Professor of Classics...
Bill Beck's picture
Bill Beck is a PhD student at the University of...
Rebecca R. Benefiel's picture
Rebecca Benefiel is Associate Professor of Classics at...
Elizabeth Bobrick's picture
Elizabeth Bobrick has taught at the University of...

Share This Page

© 2018, Society for Classical Studies Privacy Policy