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A Virtual New Page for Amphora

The editors and editorial board of the APA’s outreach publication Amphora are very pleased to announce Amphora is making itself yet more available to its readership. In coming weeks, in addition to its annual print appearance, Amphora will also publish its articles and reviews via the APA’s blog.

Articles and reviews will each have a tag of Amphora, to help readers determine which content stream is which, as usual for the blog. Such tagged pieces will also appear in the print version of the publication, possibly with minor modification as called for by a switch from one format to another.

This improvement to the availability of Amphora means we will now be able to work with authors who might have a prospective contribution with digital elements – images, perhaps, or film or sound clips, or a desire for a discussion thread or feedback – as well as with contributors whose works benefit from a print treatment.

As always, your Amphora editors welcome submissions, including submissions that take advantage of this new presentation.  These are important days for outreach activity by our professional association, and the Amphora and Outreach committees believe this new format will enable us all to reach a yet-larger market.

Amphora welcomes submissions from professional scholars and experts on topics dealing with the worlds of ancient Greece and Rome. Submissions should not only reflect sound scholarship but have wide appeal to our outreach audience. Submissions pass through blind peer review; they are typically about 1800 words in length for articles, and 1000 words in length for reviews of books or movies. Additional detail on submissions appears on the last page of each Amphora issue as well.

All of us who bring you Amphora are delighted by this opportunity and hope you are as well.

Ellen Bauerle, Editor
Wells Hansen, Assistant Editor

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Ellen Bauerle is executive editor and senior acquisitions editor for Classics and Archaeology, African Studies, Medieval Studies, and Early Modern History at the University of Michigan Press. bauerle97@gmail.com

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