2012-2013 Placement Service Now Open

The automated system for the 2012-2013 APA/AIA Placement Service is now open and accepting registrations by candidates, subscribers, and institutions.  As was the case last year, registrants will need to create an account at placement.apaclassics.org and then purchase the service(s) they wish.  Registrants who used the Service last year may (but are not required to) adopt the same username and password as before; however, they will still need to create a new account.  Detailed instructions for registering for the service and then taking advantage of its features are available at the Placement web site. 

Please note the following important changes in the service this year.

Publication of Listings.  Positions for Classicists and Archaeologists will be published around the 15th of each month as before.  Publication will consist of sending a digest of all positions listed during the previous 30 days to registered candidates, subscribers, and institutions that purchased comprehensive service.  In addition, a few days later, APA and AIA will publish the job listings on their web sites, www.apaclassics.org and www.archaeological.orgNote:  Because of the delayed opening of the Service this month, the July 2012 issue of Positions will be published around August 1.  Regular publication around the 15th of the month will begin with the August issue.

As was the case last year, candidates and subscribers who register for the Placement Service will have access to a restricted web site where new position listings will be posted as soon as they are reviewed for completeness.  In addition, candidates and subscribers will receive an e-mail on the day following the posting of any new advertisement.  This e-mail will list the institution placing the advertisement and direct candidates to the restricted web site for further information.  Because of the introduction of these e-mail notifications, the Service will no longer publish an “early edition” around the 1st of each month. 

Membership.  Persons wishing to register as candidates will no longer be required to be members of APA or AIA, but will pay a higher fee ($55 instead of $20) if they register as nonmembers.  Membership will be verified against lists which are updated monthly at the beginning of each month.  For example, if you paid your society dues in July, you will not appear on the verification list until August and will not be able to register at the lower rate until August.  The Placement Service will not refund a higher registration rate if a candidate or subscriber who pays that rate later becomes eligible for the lower rate. 

If you have forgotten your APA member number and you provided your e-mail address when you paid your dues, you can retrieve your number here.

In any case, dues must be paid no later than October 31, 2012, to qualify for the reduced member rate.

If you believe that you paid your association dues at least a month before the date you are registering, but the system does not recognize you as a member, you can check on APA dues payments and member numbers by sending an e-mail to jrnlcirc@press.jhu.edu.  You can check on AIA dues payments and member numbers by sending an e-mail to Membership@aia.bu.edu.  If you are certain that you are a member in good standing of one of the societies, send an e-mail to the Placement Director, plonskii@sas.upenn.edu

Institutional Registration.  The cost of comprehensive service for Institutions has been increased to $400 for an e-mail subscription to Positions and $450 for print.  The prices for advertisement-only services have been increased to $150 before January 10 and $125 after that date.  This is the first increase in these prices in a decade.

Please let Placement Director, Renie Plonski or me know if you encounter any difficulty using the system.

Adam D. Blistein
APA Executive Director

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"In the Bulgarian seaside resort town of Sozopol, archaeologists have unearthed an ancient temple of the goddess Demeter and her daughter Persephone, the private television channel bTV Reported on May 18 2011. The finds were made at Cape Skamnii in the ancient town of Sozopol. Numerous statues and other artifacts have been found, indicating that the site was, indeed, a temple dedicated to Demeter and Persephone." Read more in The Sofia Echo

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Thu, 05/19/2011 - 12:09pm by Information Architect.

"Strolling through outer peristyle of the Getty Villa in Malibu, Calif., is about as close as you can get to time travelling. It’s easy to feel just like a Roman citizen discussing the affairs of the day while meandering through the gardens dotted with bronze statues or sitting at the edge of the 67-metre-long reflecting pool beneath a low-hanging sun. The only thing missing is the toga. While the ancient ruins of Pompeii and Herculaneum in southern Italy leave visitors to piece together in their own minds what the daily lives of Romans must have been like, the Getty Villa leaves very little to the imagination." Read more in the Toronto Star.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Thu, 05/19/2011 - 12:05pm by Information Architect.

Mike Lippman, a professor of Classics at the University of Arizona, is featured in an article about marathon readings on Insidehighered.com.

View full article. | Posted in Member News on Thu, 05/12/2011 - 1:21pm by .

This Thursday's poem at 3 Quarks Daily is full of puns with a classical theme:

The Agamemnon Rag

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Thu, 05/12/2011 - 1:13pm by Information Architect.

Read Mary Beard's review of two new books on Hannibal at The Times Literary Supplement.

View full article. | Posted in Book Reviews on Thu, 05/12/2011 - 1:09pm by Information Architect.

"Eric Dugdale, associate professor of classics at Gustavus Adolphus College, received the 2011 Faculty Scholarly Achievement Award on May 7 at the College’s Honors Day Convocation." Read more at the Gustavus Adolphus Blog.

View full article. | Posted in Member News on Wed, 05/11/2011 - 12:57am by .

The complete financial statement for fiscal year 2009 - 2010 is now available. Click here to download it as a pdf, or go to the Financial Statements page to view current and previous statements.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Sun, 05/08/2011 - 4:07pm by .

Audiences are invited to get intimate with the action in the second instalment of a fresh take on Camus' 'Caligula.'

"As many countries in the world struggle to depose tyrants, a timely play is taking to a Bangkok stage, transporting audiences to ancient Rome to unseat an emperor who has just elected his horse as prime minister. Fancy a stab?" Read more in The Bangkok Post …

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Sun, 05/08/2011 - 12:25am by Information Architect.

"'Heracles to Alexander the Great: Treasures from the Royal Capital of Macedon, a Hellenic Kingdom in the Age of Democracy' is as crowded with objects as its title is with ideas. The Ashmolean manages to cram in about 500 objects, discovered in the royal tombs and palaces of Aegae (modern-day Vergina in the north of Greece), most of which are being displayed for the very first time." Read more at The Wall Street Journal.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Fri, 05/06/2011 - 2:11am by Information Architect.

"The transformation of humans into monsters or animals is a standard feature of two great genres: classical Greek and Roman myth and American comic books. As those of us know who spent our childhoods and teenaged years greedily hoarding the latter, such transformations are only occasionally effected by a mere change of costume. Batman, for instance (introduced in 1939), is an ordinary Homo sapiens who simply dons his bat-like hood and cape when he wants to battle evildoers; his extraordinary powers are the fruit of disciplined intellectual and physical training. More often—and more excitingly—the metamorphoses occur at the genetic level. The Incredible Hulk, who debuted in 1962, is a hypertrophied Hercules-like giant, the Mr. Hyde aspect of an otherwise mild-mannered scientist named Bruce Banner, created during a laboratory accident involving gamma rays. Wolverine, one of the X-men, who sports lupine traits following his transformations, belongs to a despised race of “mutants” with remarkable powers. (The comic book series, now reincarnated as a hugely popular film franchise, debuted in 1963.)" Read more at The New York Review of Books.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Wed, 05/04/2011 - 12:25am by Information Architect.

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