2013 Pedagogy Award Winners

Four classics teachers have received the first set of APA Pedagogy Awards.  One of the major goals of the APA’s recently and successfully completed capital campaign, Gatekeeper to Gateway:  The Campaign for Classics in the Twenty-first Century, was to ensure that an inspiring, well trained teacher would be available for every school and college classics classroom.  A subcommittee of the Joint Committee on the Classics in American Education, whose membership is selected from both the APA and the American Classical League, reviewed twenty-one applications requesting funds to support a variety activities that would improve their teaching and their students’ experiences in the classroom.  The awards received by the four successful applicants are funded by income derived from the following contributions to the Campaign’s Research and Teaching Endowment:  a major gift from an anonymous donor, a contribution from the Classical Association of the Middle West and South (CAMWS), and donations to the Friends of Zeph Stewart Fund. 

Rachel Ash (North Gwinnett High School, Norcross, GA) was awarded $1,000 to pursue an M.A. in Latin through the University of Florida’s distance learning program.

Andrew Carroll (Regis Jesuit High School) was awarded $600 to develop a series of videos about Roman and Etruscan sites as part of a curricular revision introducing a ‘flipped’ or ‘inverted’ classroom.

Catherine Nicastro (East Aurora High School, East Aurora, NY) was awarded $1,000 to participate in the Vergilian Society Summer Tour (‘The Italy of Caesar and Vergil’).

Cynthia White (The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ) was awarded $540 to participate in the Pedagogy Rusticatio, an immersion program studying pedagogical strategies for using oral Latin in the classroom.

We are grateful to the selection committee (Eric Dugdale, Gustavus Adolphus College; Keely Lake, Wayland Academy; and Nigel Nicholson, Reed College) for their careful review of the large number of applications.  In late 2013 the APA will publish a call for applications for the 2014 Pedagogy Awards and Zeph Stewart Teacher Training Award.  Applications will be due around March 1, 2014.


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The organizing committee cordially invites you to attend the 3rd INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PHARMACY AND MEDICINE IN ANCIENT EGYPT, to be held in Barcelona (Spain) on 25 - 26 October 2018.

The program includes the following speaker’s notes:

Prof. Rosalie David:

“Epidemics and their aftermath in ancient Egypt”

Emeritus Professor of Egyptology at The University of Manchester (UK).

Prof. Salima Ikram:

"Images  and analyses: recent Advances in Mummy Studies”

Distinguished Professor of Egyptology at the American University in Cairo (Egypt) and Invited Professor at Yale University (USA)

Prof. Eva-Maria Geigl:

“An Egyptian cat tale told by ancient DNA?”

Co-director of the Epigenome and paleogenome lab of the Institut Jacques Monod, University Paris-Diderot (Paris 7)/CNRS in Paris (France).

*In recent studies, Prof. Geigl and her team have demonstrated that the Ancient Egyptians were first to domesticate the cats.

Prof. Sahar Saleem:

"Ancient Egyptian medicine and health in the eyes of modern science"

Professor of Radiology at Kasr Al-Ainy Faculty of Medicine of the Cairo University (Egypt). Leading member of Egyptian Mummy Project - Egypt.

Dr. Jesús Herrerín López:

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Thu, 01/11/2018 - 8:41am by Erik Shell.

Ex uno nihil fit nisi unum: Greek, Latin, Arabic, and Hebrew Perspectives. (Abstracts due Jan. 22 to Eric Perl <Eric.Perl@lmu.edu>)

Michael Chase <goya@vjf.cnrs.fr>

At the beginning of his Commentary on the Liber De Causis (lib. 1, tract. 1, cap. 16, p. 13, 69-71 Fauser), Albert the Great writes: “This proposition, that from what is one and simple, only what is one can result (ab uno simplici non est nisi unum) is written by Aristotle in a letter which is on the Principle of the Being of the Universe (qui est de principio universi esse), and it is taken up and explained by Al-Farabi, Avicenna and Averroes”.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 01/11/2018 - 8:37am by Erik Shell.

This is the first of several communications addressing the aftermath of the winter storm that coincided with the start of the Boston meeting.  Please be alert for communications later this week about registration refunds. However, this message concerns annual meeting travel stipends.

If you received a stipend and attended the meeting or expended your stipend trying to get to the meeting, then there is nothing that you need to do.  Thank you for attending or for trying to get to Boston under very difficult circumstances!

If you received a stipend and did not use the funds to travel (or attempt to travel) to Boston, you have two options:

(a) You may hold you stipend until next year and use it for the 2019 San Diego meeting. If you elect this option, you must inform the Executive Director (helen.cullyer@nyu.edu).  You will not be eligible for a new stipend for 2019 if you retain your funding. 

(b) If you do not anticipate attending in 2019, or do not want to hold onto the funds, please return the funding by check to the SCS office. Checks should be made payable to the Society for Classical Studies and sent to Society for Classical Studies, 20 Cooper Sq. 2nd Fl., New York, NY 10003


View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 01/09/2018 - 8:07pm by Helen Cullyer.

Please see winter and spring deadlines for SCS awards and fellowships:

Nominations for graduate student participants in summer Material Culture seminar at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign: January 15, 2018

Coffin Fellowship, for secondary school teachers traveling abroad: February 28, 2018

Zeph Stewart Award, supporting teacher training: March 2, 2018

Pedagogy Award, open to K-12 teachers and college and university faculty: March 2, 2018

Ludwig Koenen Fellowship for summer training in papyrology: March 28, 2018


View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Tue, 01/09/2018 - 10:40am by Helen Cullyer.
Poster for Arsonists
Arsonists are systematically torching the town!  First, they wheedle their way into your home and then burn it to the ground.  As the play opens, a mysterious wrestler from a recently incinerated circus arrives at Gottlieb Biedermann’s front door seeking some “kindness and humanity” - perhaps even a little "bread and wine" to go with it.   Will Biedermann let him in? Of course he does.  Will Biedermann then believe the wrestler and his charming companion when it becomes evident to him that they are, in fact, arsonists?  What will he do once he sees how far it has all gone?   
View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 01/04/2018 - 5:28am by Helen Cullyer.

Please visit our Annual Meeting page for updates:


As of this morning, we know of just one panel that is completely cancelled.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 01/04/2018 - 5:14am by Helen Cullyer.
Boston Skyscrapers

The SCS Committee on Diversity in the Profession invites annual meeting attendees to a reception on

Thursday January 4, 2018 at 9pm

St. George B, Westin Copley Place

Meet the committee members and learn about the new committee.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 12/26/2017 - 8:28pm by Helen Cullyer.
Boston Skyscrapers

The SCS Advisory Board of the Thesaurus Linguae Latinae Fellowship is holding a reception on

Thursday January 4, 2018 at 6pm

Atrium Lounge, Marriott Copley Place

All interested in the TLL and the NEH-funded TLL Fellowship Program, administered annually by SCS, are invited to attend.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 12/26/2017 - 8:09pm by Helen Cullyer.

Ongoing discussions in academic circles about the value and purpose of 3-D immersive technologies have lately been sharpened by the emergence of consumer-ready VR and inexpensive game engines, especially Unity. One side of that discussion asserts that, in an academic context, these technologies are primarily valuable to the extent that they advance serious scientific and data visualization research. Others maintain that game design and “play” more broadly are equally important, and can transform how we teach many subjects. One approach does not exclude the other, of course, but my own experience has convinced me of the exciting potential of the latter, play-based, mode. For classicists, interdisciplinary as we are, the 3-D interactive future of research and teaching beyond textbooks holds important opportunities, especially if we take an active, collaborative role in shaping that future.

View full article. | Posted in on Tue, 12/26/2017 - 12:00am by David Fredrick.

by Ronnie Ancona

Since my original article (see below) about Carl Sesar’s (then out of print) Catullus, many people have asked me whether the book is back in print. The very good news is that it has indeed been available, with some revisions, from Sesar’s own One Shot Press since 2013. He would be happy to answer questions about this publication via email (carlsesar@gmail.com) or snail mail (Carl Sesar, One Shot Press, 7 Bardwell St., Florence, MA 01062).


by Ronnie Ancona

View full article. | Posted in on Sat, 12/23/2017 - 2:27am by Wells Hansen.


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