The 2017 Bernice L. Fox Classics Writing Contest for High School Students

March 15, 2017

The Bernice L. Fox Classics Writing Contest sponsored by the Department of Classics at Monmouth College

Topic: A Figure from Classical History, Literature, or Mythology as the Next President of the United States

Make a pitch for a classical figure as president, or depict that person acting as president or on the campaign trail.

This contest is open to any student enrolled full-time in high school during the current school year. An award of $250.00 will be given to the author of the best entry written in English on the specified theme. The entry may be an essay, a short story, a play, a poem, or any original literary work.

This contest was established in 1985 by the Department of Classics at Monmouth College in Monmouth, Illinois, to honor Bernice L. Fox, to promote the study of Latin and the Classics in high schools, and to recognize the good work of high school students.

Judging

The entry should make frequent, specific, accurate, and appropriate references to events from historical or other classical sources, and to contemporary circumstances. Papers will be judged on accuracy to ancient sources, appropriate use of those sources, originality, quality of material, thematic development, appropriateness, correctness of English style, and effectiveness of presentation.

Contest Guidelines

  • Entries must be typed, double-spaced, and on 8-1/2 x 11 inch paper.
  • Printing on both sides of a page is acceptable.
  • No electronic submissions.
  • The entry must fit the theme of this year's contest.
  • No minimum or maximum length is required.
  • The entrant's name and school must not appear on the entry.
  • Contestants should place a personal identification code (a randomly selected nine character series) on the top left-hand corner of every page of the entry and on a separate 8-1/2 x 11 inch sheet of paper, which also contains the following information:
    • author's name, date of birth, the student's personal identification code, school name, school address, teacher's name, and school phone number.
  • No more than ten entries will be accepted from any individual school, and only one entry per student.
  • Failure to follow these guidelines will result in disqualification.
  • All entries must be postmarked no later than March 15th, and mailed to Dr. Robert Holschuh Simmons, Monmouth College, Monmouth, Illinois 61462 (e-mail: rsimmons@monmouthcollege.edu).
  • All entries become the property of Monmouth College.
  • The winner will be announced on or by April 15th on the contest website.
  • Every entrant will receive a certificate of participation from Monmouth College.
  • For further information, including a list of previous winners, please consult the contest website (http://department.monm.edu/classics/Department/FoxContest/).

About Bernice L. Fox

Bernice L. Fox taught courses in English, Latin and Greek at Monmouth College from 1947 to 1981, and served as chair of the Department of Classics from 1970 till her retirement in 1981. Throughout her long and dynamic career she worked tirelessly to promote the Classics in Illinois high schools and colleges. She is also the author of Tela Charlottae, the Latin translation of E. B. White's Charlotte's Web. In 1991 Monmouth College conferred on her the honorary degree of Doctor of Humane Letters. She died in 2003.

Categories

Follow SCS News for information about the SCS and all things classical.

Use this field to search SCS News
Select a category from this list to limit the content on this page.

"Some time in the 1920s, the Conservative statesman F. E. Smith — Lord Birkenhead — gave a copy of the “Nicomachean Ethics” to his close friend Winston Churchill. He did so saying there were those who thought this was the greatest book of all time. Churchill returned it some weeks later, saying it was all very interesting, but he had already thought most of it out for himself. But it is the very genius of Aristotle — as it is of every great teacher — to make you think he is uncovering your own thought in his. In Churchill’s case, it is also probable that the classical tradition informed more of his upbringing, at home and at school, than he realized." 

Read more of Harry Jaffa's review of Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics (Robert C. Bartlett and Susan D. Collins, trans.) at the New York Times online…

View full article. | Posted in Book Reviews on Sat, 07/02/2011 - 5:31pm by Information Architect.

Mary Beard regrets that an elegant history of Rome is marred by howlers. Read the review at The Guardian online.

View full article. | Posted in Book Reviews on Wed, 06/29/2011 - 1:13pm by Information Architect.

http://www.digitalclassicist.org/

The Digital Classicist is a decentralised and international community of scholars and students interested in the application of innovative digital methods and technologies to research on the ancient world. The Digital Classicist is not core funded, and nor is it owned by any institution. The main purpose of this site is to offer a web-based hub for discussion, collaboration and communication.

View full article. | Posted in Websites and Resources on Thu, 06/23/2011 - 1:35pm by .

"An enigmatic message on a Roman gladiator's 1,800-year-old tombstone has finally been decoded, telling a treacherous tale. The epitaph and art on the tombstone suggest the gladiator, named Diodorus, lost the battle (and his life) due to a referee's error, according to Michael Carter, a professor at Brock University in St. Catharines, Canada. Carter studies gladiator contests and other spectacles in the eastern part of the Roman Empire." Read more at LiveScience.com…

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Mon, 06/20/2011 - 1:25pm by Information Architect.

"Jacques A. Bailly, an associate professor of classics at the University of Vermont, is the department's director of graduate studies. He has also been the official pronouncer of words at the Scripps National Spelling Bee since 2003. He won the annual bee as an eighth grader in 1980." Read the interview with Prof. Bailly at The Chronicle of Higher Education's web site.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Thu, 06/16/2011 - 3:37pm by Information Architect.

"NATO refused to say Tuesday whether or not it would bomb ancient Roman ruins in Libya if it knew Moammar Gadhafi was hiding military equipment there. 'We will strike military vehicles, military forces, military equipment or military infrastructure that threaten Libyan civilians as necessary,' a NATO official in Naples told CNN, declining to give his name in discussing internal NATO deliberations." Read more at CNN World online.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Tue, 06/14/2011 - 2:30pm by Information Architect.

The American Philological Association is pleased to announce the appointment of Dr. Ellen Bauerle of the University of Michigan Press as Editor, and Dr. Wells Hansen of Milton Academy as Assistant Editor, of Amphora, its Outreach publication, effective January 2012.

Ellen has for several years worked as the editor for classics and archaeology at the University of Michigan Press. She also oversees book production for the not-for-profit Michigan Classical Press, and in the past has created and sold ebooks on the web.  Recipient of a BA in Greek and English from Oberlin College, and an MA and PhD in Classics from the University of Michigan - Ann Arbor, she has been an Eric P. Newman Fellow at the American Numismatic Society and Seymour Fellow at the American School of Classical Studies in Athens.  Ellen is delighted that Amphora is evolving to include the latest technologies, as additional ways of reaching its key constituencies among interested nonspecialists, scholars, teachers and students at the secondary level, and administrators.  

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 06/13/2011 - 6:27pm by .

Read Michael Collier's poem "Laelaps" and a critical essay about it by Lisa Russ Sparr at The Chronicle of Higher Education's web site.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Mon, 06/13/2011 - 2:29pm by Information Architect.

Got Latin? Got Greek?

View full article. | Posted in Degree and Certificate Programs on Fri, 06/10/2011 - 2:42pm by .

Delivered by Charlie Bridge (Class of 2011), a Classics Concentrator, at Harvard Commencement on May 27:

Rota Fortunae

Praeses Faust; Decani Professoresque sapientissimi; familiae, amici, et hospites honoratissimi; et tandem condiscipuli carissimi…salvete omnes!  Mihi voluptas magna atque honor altus est huius ceremoniae incipiendae in hoc theatro augusto Trecentensimo.  Nec solum conventum ultimum classis nostrae, anni duomillensimi et undecimi, sed etiam conventum trecentensimum et sexagensimum huius universitatis hodie celebramus. 

Hoc cum animadvertissem gaudebam, propter sensum singularem numeri trecenti et sexaginta.  Ne mihi quidem, litterarum antiquarum discipulo, latere potest orbem omnem in partes trecentas et sexaginta esse divisum.  Venit etiam in mentem orbis quidam praecipuus, qui vitas nostras hos quattuor annos rexit: Rota scilicet Fortunae Harvardiana.  Temporibus antiquis, rota signum erat levis mobilisque naturae fatorum – circuitus vel unus cladem felicissimis afferre atque miseros extollere potest.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Tue, 06/07/2011 - 7:05pm by Information Architect.

Pages

Latest Stories

SCS Announcements
Many thanks to Bill Beck for his SCS blog post on
Calls for Papers
Generic Interplay in and after Vergil
Awards and Fellowships

© 2019, Society for Classical Studies Privacy Policy