2017 Outreach Prize

The SCS Outreach Prize Committee has awarded the 2017 Outreach Prize to Professor Roberta Stewart of Dartmouth College for her work in developing book discussion groups on the Homeric poems with military veterans. Professor Stewart's long-running initiative is now a major collaborative project of Dartmouth College and New Hampshire Humanities, funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Award Citation

Even in today's busy, noisy, and self-absorbed world, the passionate, quiet, and selfless work of the individual does not remain unnoticed. We are proud to offer the 2017 SCS Outreach Prize to Roberta Stewart for her tireless pursuit of healing and social justice (in New Hampshire and Vermont) through engaging veterans in reading and discussing Homer's Iliad and Odyssey. By teaching them how to appropriate the two epics as living texts, she has given veterans, as one of them put it, the controlling voice in processing their experiences and their Odyssean stories of homecoming in particular.

Since she has taken Homer out of the classroom and into the book group more than a decade ago, Roberta Stewart has demonstrated that anyone can read Homer and that the figured world of the Iliad and the Odyssey cannot be overestimated in our own days. Teaching empathy, it enables veterans to create a self-narrative that helps them to overcome trauma, and it enables the community to negotiate reintegration. 

Driven by her own empathy, Roberta Stewart first proposed book groups to her local VA. In summer 2016, helped by a grant from the NEH, she trained three-person teams consisting of a veteran, a scholar, and a clinician to co-lead a 14-week discussion of Homer's Odyssey with veterans and service members in four parts of New Hampshire.

Though Roberta Stewart insists that the real work of the Homer book groups comes not from her but from the veterans themselves, we want to express our respect and gratitude for her truly inspiring work in the field of outreach. We are, again, delighted to present Roberta Stewart with the SCS Outreach Prize. Thank you for your admirable work, Roberta!

SCS Outreach Prize Committee

Barbara Weinlich, Chair

Daniel Harris-McCoy

Emily Allen-Hornblower

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(Photo: "library" by Viva Vivanista, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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The Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies (ICCS) has started a GoFundMe page in order to establish a scholarship in honor of Garrett Fagan, who passed away earlier this year.

"Garrett will always be remembered as an influential mentor, an inspiring teacher, a supportive colleague, a loving father, and a fierce friend, and for this reason, we've decided to establish a scholarship in Garrett's name for the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome."

You can visit the GoFundMe page to read the rest of the information about the proposed scholarship or to donate.

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(Photo: "Dublin, Ireland" by Giuseppe Milo, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Wed, 06/28/2017 - 2:24pm by Erik Shell.

Position Title: Managing Editor, Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library (DOML)

Supervisor: Director of Dumbarton Oaks

Department: Director’s Office

Hours: Full-time, 35 hours per week

Duties and Responsibilities

The Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library (DOML), published by Harvard University Press, launched in 2010 with the mission to offer major literary texts of medieval and Byzantine culture in literature, history, philosophy, and other realms of learning. The series has three aims: to make texts readily accessible in both content and price to a broad readership of English speakers, while also meeting the standards of experts; to equip non-specialist readers with the basic information needed to understand and appreciate the text; and to keep volumes in print for a long time. Each volume is bilingual, presenting a source text with an English translation on the facing page.  General readers, undergraduate and graduate students, and professional scholars from within and without medieval and Byzantine studies are the target audience. DOML began with a focus on three languages: Byzantine Greek, Medieval Latin, and Old English. The series now numbers 49 volumes, and is poised to incorporate additional vernacular languages with a new subseries, Medieval Iberia.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 06/28/2017 - 11:41am by Erik Shell.

Election materials are now online.  These materials include all candidate statements and the text of the new Working Conditions statement, which, if approved by the membership, will become part of the Society's Professional Ethics statement.  Voting will begin on August 1, 2017.

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 06/28/2017 - 10:42am by Helen Cullyer.

The SCS Placement Service has finished its 2016-2017 Placement season. Institutional reporting information on who was hired or the results of those searches - as required by our Placement Service Guidelines - can be found on this page.

If there are any results that have been finalized but do not appear on that page please have the hiring department contact the Placement Service coordinator Erik Shell at erik.shell@nyu.edu.

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 06/27/2017 - 10:07am by Erik Shell.
Compositing Bench

Traditional presses play a vital role in classical studies. Nevertheless, many scholars have written a book that may be better served by other means. For some, this book is a monograph, a collection of essays, or a revised edition that a publisher did not consider financially viable. For others, it is a much-needed commentary or translation. For still others, it is a collaborative research project created with engaged students. There will always be high-quality books that traditional publishers consider too costly to produce. Self-publishing and print-on-demand offer classicists a suitable alternative.

As the author of a self-published book in classical studies, I exercise almost complete control over my work. I have the power to sell my book at the price I choose; if I wish to change the price from $20 to $15, I can do so with a single click. If a reader notices a typo, I can make the correction at my kitchen table and guarantee that a revised paperback will be available within twenty-four hours. If I decide to rewrite several paragraphs, or update the book to reflect the most recent secondary literature, those changes will appear within a day. As author and self-publisher, I am not worried that a book to which I devoted several years of my life will go out of print. I alone make that decision, and it costs nothing to keep a book available. If I want to publish a second edition, that too is my call.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 06/26/2017 - 12:00am by Geoffrey Steadman.

What’s So Funny?

Discovering and Interpreting Humor in the Ancient World

20-21 April 2018

The Ohio State University

Columbus, Ohio 

Keynote Speakers:

•    Jack Sasson (Emeritus Professor, Vanderbilt University)

•    Ian Ruffell (Classics, University of Glasgow)

•    Amy Richlin (Classics, University of California at Los Angeles)

•    Christine Hayes (Religious Studies, Yale University)

Humor is a ubiquitous human phenomenon with a wide range of applications. Yet, what is deemed humorous is often culturally determined. This poses a significant challenge for scholars of ancient cultures. How do we identify what an ancient culture found funny? How did they use humor, and what drove their usage?

The purpose of this conference is to provide a forum for scholars across disciplines to discuss and debate humor and its functions in both textual and material sources across the ancient Mediterranean, from the early Near East through late antiquity. We invite papers that address the above questions, or any others, on the topic of humor in an ancient Mediterranean context.  

Possible topics include:

•       Theoretical models for identifying and understanding humor and comedy in ancient cultures

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 06/23/2017 - 7:48am by Erik Shell.

The inaugural conference of the Canadian Aristotle Society conference will be May 9, 10, and 11, 2018, at the Dominican University College, Ottawa, ON.  The theme of this conference is the following:  Aristotle: A Critic of Plato. Please submit a one-page abstract to Dr. Mark Nyvlt at mark.nyvlt@dominicanu.ca.  The deadline is January 31st, 2018.  Our first Keynote speaker will be Dr. Thomas De Koninck.

The purpose of the bilingual Canadian Aristotle Society is to establish a Centre wherein the themes of Aristotle, along with the Aristotelian tradition, are kept alive by way of either conferences or eventually publications.  The spirit of this Society will be speculative and classical in nature, though this does not exclude the analytical and continental traditions.  That the Faculty of Philosophy at the Dominican University will house this Society can only enrich its mission to sustain the Aristotelian spirit by both the Anglophone and Francophone communities in Canada and beyond.  Their intention is to make this Society into a dynamic Centre that will attract primarily Aristotelian scholars, but also scholars and interested parties from various other disciplines, such as the classics, theology, politics, art, etc.

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Bonjour,

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 06/21/2017 - 3:13pm by Erik Shell.

THEORIZING CONTACTS IN THE ROMAN EMPIRE
UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH, 8-9 December 2017

We live in a multicultural world, in which every community develops in constant interaction with others. A series of theoretical models have been developed to explain these contacts, which in recent years have been utilized to understand the ancient world. In the context of the Roman empire, these theories are typically used to examine the interactions of various indigenous populations with their rulers. These kinds of studies were once grouped under the heading “Romanization”, though the increased questioning of the term’s validity has given rise to a diverse range of alternatives. These are often drawn from modern theoretical backgrounds: multiculturalism and multilingualism are two recent concepts employed in this realm.

The aim of this conference is to assess the validity and scope of a variety of some of these models, with a particular focus on multilingualism and multiculturalism. By promoting and facilitating dialogue between disciplines, we shall aim to provide effective tools for different fields’ approaches in parallel (e.g. historical and linguistic). This has already been done very successfully in a few cases (e.g. ‘code-switching’), though greater interaction remains a desideratum. It is hoped that the participants will thereby open the discussion for a ‘theory of contact’ in the Roman world.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Wed, 06/21/2017 - 8:40am by Erik Shell.

The Atlas Project of Roman Aqueducts (ROMAQ) is an initiative to collect published information about Roman aqueducts from the period of 400 BC to 400 AD. The project website was developed between 2004 and 2011, but the database and other efforts do not appear to have been actively updated since 2013. As it stands, the project’s scope is limited to large aqueducts that served cities and towns, excluding smaller aqueducts that served areas like villas and mines. The need for such a project, as the authors highlight on the landing page, is four-fold:

  • aqueducts are important as cultural heritage;
  • bibliographic resources on aqueducts are in many languages and can be difficult to access;
  • aqueducts provide data for scientific topics like hydrology, geology, and engineering;
  • aqueducts are vulnerable to destruction.

The ROMAQ team particularly hoped that the compilation of information about aqueducts and their locations might reduce intentional and accidental damage.

The ROMAQ website has three parts: a map, the database of aqueducts, and a list of references.

The Map

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 06/19/2017 - 7:03pm by Jacqueline DiBiasie Sammons.

Presidential Letter

June 19, 2017

Dear Colleagues,

Recent weeks and months have seen an increase in the cultural tensions in our nation—and, indeed, the world.  It is not uncommon now for disagreements to escalate quickly into verbal attacks, threats of violence, and even—as recently took place in Washington, DC—actual violence.  Unquestionably, this tendency has been facilitated by social media.  But our digital media are only a means or instrument.  More troubling is the mentality fueling the rush to attack, across the political spectrum; and that is an unwillingness to verify information, weigh arguments, and attempt to make independent, rationally-grounded judgments.  These habits of mind are the very bedrock of learning and of scholarship; they are the principles on which the SCS, as a learned society, is founded and which we have a duty to uphold and protect.  

View full article. | Posted in Presidential Letters on Mon, 06/19/2017 - 11:11am by Helen Cullyer.

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