2017 Outreach Prize

The SCS Outreach Prize Committee has awarded the 2017 Outreach Prize to Professor Roberta Stewart of Dartmouth College for her work in developing book discussion groups on the Homeric poems with military veterans. Professor Stewart's long-running initiative is now a major collaborative project of Dartmouth College and New Hampshire Humanities, funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Award Citation

Even in today's busy, noisy, and self-absorbed world, the passionate, quiet, and selfless work of the individual does not remain unnoticed. We are proud to offer the 2017 SCS Outreach Prize to Roberta Stewart for her tireless pursuit of healing and social justice (in New Hampshire and Vermont) through engaging veterans in reading and discussing Homer's Iliad and Odyssey. By teaching them how to appropriate the two epics as living texts, she has given veterans, as one of them put it, the controlling voice in processing their experiences and their Odyssean stories of homecoming in particular.

Since she has taken Homer out of the classroom and into the book group more than a decade ago, Roberta Stewart has demonstrated that anyone can read Homer and that the figured world of the Iliad and the Odyssey cannot be overestimated in our own days. Teaching empathy, it enables veterans to create a self-narrative that helps them to overcome trauma, and it enables the community to negotiate reintegration. 

Driven by her own empathy, Roberta Stewart first proposed book groups to her local VA. In summer 2016, helped by a grant from the NEH, she trained three-person teams consisting of a veteran, a scholar, and a clinician to co-lead a 14-week discussion of Homer's Odyssey with veterans and service members in four parts of New Hampshire.

Though Roberta Stewart insists that the real work of the Homer book groups comes not from her but from the veterans themselves, we want to express our respect and gratitude for her truly inspiring work in the field of outreach. We are, again, delighted to present Roberta Stewart with the SCS Outreach Prize. Thank you for your admirable work, Roberta!

SCS Outreach Prize Committee

Barbara Weinlich, Chair

Daniel Harris-McCoy

Emily Allen-Hornblower

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(Photo: "library" by Viva Vivanista, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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Association of Ancient Historians Annual Meeting

College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia, April 19-21, 2018.

Call for Papers

We seek papers that raise broader issues and themes that will engage all AAH attendees regardless of their primary specialization. As always with the AAH, all sessions are plenary.   Papers will be 20 minutes in length, with time for discussion.

Please send abstracts (.pdf or .docx) of no more than 500 words to aahmeeting2018@gmail.com by Monday, December 4, 2017. Limited references may be provided in-text only; no bibliographies please. Name your submission file in a way that indicates the panel to which you are applying.

We anticipate holding sessions on the following themes:

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 09/25/2017 - 9:30am by Erik Shell.

The following members were chosen in the elections held this Summer. They take office on January 2018, except for the two new members of the Nominating Committee who take office immediately.

President-Elect

Tolly Boatwright

Vice President, Education

Ariana Traill

Board of Directors

Christina Kraus

Mary Jaeger

Program Committee

Barbara Weiden Boyd

Raffaella Cribiore

Timothy Moore

Committee on Professional Ethics

Andrew Feldherr

Jennifer Larson

Nominating Committee

Ralph Rosen

Lillian Doherty

Goodwin Award Committee

Carolyn Dewald

Jeffery Henderson

Working Conditions Statement

Approved

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 09/25/2017 - 8:43am by Erik Shell.

A Mid-Republican House at Gabii is an ambitious project. It extends the born-digital movement in archaeology, in that the final publication of an excavation is a website with an ISBN and long-term hosting by the University of Michigan. In addition to a traditional presentation of the finds, the publication includes the full excavation database disseminated through the Archaeological Recording Kit (ARK). The resource also presents the architectural remains and contexts in an interactive 3-D environment, coded using the gaming platform Unity. The latter two components of this forward-looking publication especially merit review as a digital project. Does the Gabii publication represent a competitive alternative to the traditional format of the excavation monograph?

Text

The Tincu house—named after a donor who provided funding and volunteered during the excavations—was built ca. 280–260 BCE within a plot left open for more than a century following the establishment of Gabii’s street network around 400 BCE. Domestic activity continued until roughly 100 BCE, after which the structure was substantially reconfigured, apparently to serve as an annex for a public building nearby. By the middle of the 1st century CE the annex was abandoned.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 09/25/2017 - 12:00am by Philip Sapirstein.

(From Philip Soergel, Chair of the Department of History, University of Maryland, College Park)

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Fri, 09/22/2017 - 8:02am by Erik Shell.

The deadline to receive nominations for the SCS Award for Exellence in Precollegiate Teaching has been extended to October 2, 2017.

Teachers, full- or part-time, of grades K-12 in schools in the United States and Canada who at the time of the application teach at least one class of Latin, Greek, or classics at the K-12 level are eligible.

Nominees do not have to be SCS members.

To learn more about the nomination process, visit the award's webpage.

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(Photo: "library" by Viva Vivanista, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Wed, 09/20/2017 - 9:08am by Erik Shell.

The Committee on Diversity in the Profession of the Society for Classical Studies (SCS) invites applications from minority undergraduate students from across North America for scholarships to be awarded for Summer 2018. The purpose of the scholarship is to further students’ study of classics or classical archaeology with opportunities not available during the school year. Eligible proposals might include (but are not limited to) participation in classical summer programs or field schools in the Mediterranean or language training at institutions in the U.S., Canada, or Europe. The maximum amount of each award will be $4,500.

The receipt deadline for applications is 5:00 p.m. Eastern Time, December 8, 2017; results will be announced by the end of January 2018.  All application materials should be sent as e-mail attachments to the Executive Director of the SCS, Dr. Helen Cullyer, at helen.cullyer@nyu.edu.

To learn more about the scholarship and how to apply, visit the scholarship's webpage.

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View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Wed, 09/20/2017 - 9:02am by Erik Shell.

The Latin and Linguistics Workshop (LLW) combines the field of Linguistics and the teaching of Latin. The goals of the LLW include:

  • The discussion of current issues surrounding Latin instruction and the tools of Linguistics to revitalize the teaching of Latin
  • The discussion of current issues surrounding the teaching of Linguistics at the high school level and the creation of a new Advanced Placement (AP) course and exam in Linguistics

Keynote speaker: Prof. Renato Oniga Università di Udine (Italy) Author of Latin: A Linguistic Introduction

Dates: October 13-14, 2017
Location: Stony Brook University
Contact: llw@stonybrook.edu

Registration is free.

Conference Website: www.stonybrook.edu/llw

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View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Tue, 09/19/2017 - 10:33am by Erik Shell.

(From our colleagues at Wadham College)

It is with great sadness that we announce the sudden death of Emeritus Fellow and Classicist James Morwood, at the age of 73, while on holiday in Greece. Details of a memorial service will be published in due course.

Below is a list of his accomplishments, adapted from his biography at Wadham College:

James Morwood was elected to a Fellowship at Wadham College in 1996, where he taught and served as Dean of Degrees, Steward of Common Room, and Dean (the last post from 2000 to 2006). He became an Emeritus Fellow in 2006 and was the Editor of the Wadham Gazette.

James was educated at Peterhouse, Cambridge, where he sat Part I of the Classical Tripos and Part II of the English Tripos. After a year at Merton College, Oxford on the course for the Diploma of Education, he went to Harrow School in September 1966 to teach Classics and English. He spent 30 years at Harrow, the last seventeen of them as Head of Classics. He was deeply involved in school journalism and drama, working with Richard Curtis and Ben Cumberbatch among many others. He was librarian for more than eleven years, and sat on and later chaired the school’s Treasures Committee, a body which brought into existence the Old Speech Room Gallery.

In 1996 he moved to Oxford University and took up the post of Grocyn Lecturer in the Classics Faculty and served for a year as President of the Oxford Philological Society.

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Mon, 09/18/2017 - 1:50pm by Erik Shell.
Aeneas Departs from Carthage (Aeneid, Book IV)

Intermediate Latin students typically encounter Latin poetry for the first time with Vergil’s Aeneid. After a brief tutorial on the rules and patterns of dactylic hexameter, they plunge in with arma virumque cano. They learn scansion not only for the sake of tradition and proper understanding of the poem, but also so that they can appreciate its rhythms and artistry—the same reasons English teachers have for teaching their students iambic pentameter for Shakespeare. The symphony of “longs and shorts” can seem forbidding to students at first, and the remedy for this is most often simply practice. Today, given the convenience of phone and tablet apps, and their potential to transform idle moments of otium into more productive ones, the Pericles Group, LLC has created the Latin Scansion App to help Latin AP students practice scanning Vergil. Aulus Gellius, who scraped together his Attic Nights from omnia subsiciva et subsecundaria tempora (“all my spare and third rate time” praef. 23), would no doubt approve.

The title screen has three main buttons: Marathon, Timed, and Achievements. “Marathon” allows the user to select a range of lines from the AP syllabus and to scan them in an untimed session.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 09/18/2017 - 12:00am by Patrick Paul Hogan.

Classical Representations in Popular Culture

The Southwest Popular / American Culture Association (SWPACA) will once again be sponsoring sessions on CLASSICAL REPRESENTATIONS IN POPULAR CULTURE at their 39th annual conference, February 7-10, 2018 at Hyatt Regency Hotel and Conference Center in beautiful Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Papers on any aspect of Greek and Roman antiquity in contemporary culture are eligible for consideration.

Potential topics include:

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 09/15/2017 - 3:23pm by Erik Shell.

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