Annual Meeting Message from Michele Renee Salzman

Dear Attendees:

The 2018 SCS-AIA Meeting in Boston is just a month away! The Program Committee has worked hard to put together a rewarding and stimulating meeting and, as Vice President for Programs, I am particularly pleased by the growing number of panels – some 18 were accepted for the Boston meeting, an increase by three over last year. I want now to call your attention to a few of the exciting events that are planned.

President S. Georgia Nugent will focus attention on the “The PhD Today: This Is Your Brain on Classics.” Her presidential panel on Friday, January 5, from 5-6 pm brings together three graduates of Classics PhD programs who have elected career paths in law, technology, and secondary school teaching. They will discuss why and how they transitioned from the traditional expectation of a career in college teaching, as well as how their graduate study in classics affects their lives today. In her presidential address on Friday, January 5, from 6-7 pm, entitled “Chiron Meets Charon: On Crossing Over to the Dark Side,” president Nugent will reflect on the transition from professoriate to presidency and the invaluable lessons that study of the classics provides. This address will take place during the Plenary Session, at which SCS awards will be presented.

This presidential panel and address is one part of a three-pronged initiative during the annual meeting in order to highlight differing career possibilities open to Classics PhD’s. A special Career Networking event will take place on Saturday, January 6, from 12-2pm. This will bring together Classics PhD holders now working today in a variety of fields in who will be available to discuss career paths with interested meeting attendees.

The SCS Program Committee invites you to attend a special panel in Boston that will address a significant, contemporary issue: how do the political and rhetorical theories and practices of the ancient world illuminate current developments? The panel, "Rhetoric: Then and Now," will take place on Saturday, January 7. from 5-6:45. The panel includes four Classicists whose research addresses ancient rhetoric directly – Professors Joy Connolly, Curtis Dozier, Johanna Hanink, and Dan-el Padilla Peralta; in addition, we have invited a special guest, Mark Thompson, President and CEO of the New York Times and former Director General of the BBC. Thompson is the author of "Enough Said: What's Gone Wrong with the Language of Politics?" (St. Martin's Press, 2016), and has been a visiting professor of Rhetoric and the Art of Public Persuasion at the University of Oxford. His background and research adds a unique contemporary dimension to this panel for which Paul Allen Miller, Carolina Distinguished Professor at the University of South Carolina, will be the presider. After their presentations, there will be ample for discussion in what we hope will be a lively interchange. And for those of you who cannot be there in person, we plan to film this event and post it on the SCS YouTube page.

I look forward to seeing as many of you as possible in Boston. After the meetings, the SCS/AIA will distribute a survey to assess your views on the program. We want to encourage dialogue at the meetings and afterwards.  As I noted, we will be filming the “Rhetoric: Then and Now Panel” to encourage discussion. If you use Twitter, remember to use the conference hashtag #aiascs!

Michele Renee Salzman
Vice President for Programs, SCS

---

(Photo: "Empty Boardroom" by Reynermedia, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

Categories

Follow SCS News for information about the SCS and all things classical.

Use this field to search SCS News
Select a category from this list to limit the content on this page.

This is a reminder that the deadline to fill out the registration form for the Career Networking Event is November 22nd.

This event is only open to those who pre-register for it.

To sign up, fill out this form before the 22nd, and be sure to direct any questions to info@classicalstudies.org

---

(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 11/16/2017 - 8:18am by Erik Shell.
CLEISTHENES WORKSHOP
 
on Ancient Greek Thought and Practices from Homer to Plato
 
April 5th (2 pm) – 6th (5pm), 2018 in Besançon, France.
Scientific Committee : Michel Fartzoff, Karin Mackowiak, Arnaud Macé
Logiques de l'Agir EA 2274 & Institut des sciences et techniques de l'Antiquité EA 4011
 
CALL FOR PAPERS.
 
View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 11/14/2017 - 10:50am by Erik Shell.

The C.J. Goodwin Award of Merit Committee has selected three winners of this year's Goodwin Award.  All three will be honored at the Plenary Session at the Boston Annual Meeting.  You can click on the names below to read the full citations.

James I. PorterThe Sublime in Antiquity, Cambridge University Press, 2016

Amy RussellThe Politics of Public Space in Republican Rome, Cambridge University Press, 2015

Peter T. StruckDivination and Human Nature: A Cognitive History of Intuition in Classical Antiquity, Princeton University Press, 2016

James Porter

James Porter's The Sublime in Antiquity is a critical tour-de-force and at the same time a rich and open-ended source-book that will delight readers interested in how the Greeks and Romans described and analyzed the experience of being struck, captivated, even overwhelmed by an act of hearing, viewing, or reading – an experience surely familiar to all lovers of Classical literature and art.

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Tue, 11/14/2017 - 9:56am by Helen Cullyer.

The SCS Teaching Excellence Awards Committee has awarded three prizes this year to the following teachers at the college and university level:

E. Del Chrol (Marshall University)

Shelley Haley (Hamilton College)

Mary Pendergraft (Wake Forest University)

The winners will receive their awards at the Plenary Session at the Boston Annual Meeting. Please click on the names above to read the full citations. 

E. Del Chrol

The committee is delighted to recognize Professor E. Del Chrol of the Humanities Program at Marshall University in Huntington, West Virginia, where he has been for the past twelve years.  Prof. Chrol is already a decorated teacher: he has won the Pickens-Queen Teaching Award at Marshall, the West Virginia Foreign Language Teachers Association’s Outstanding Teacher of the Year Award, and, in graduate school at the University of Southern California, both a departmental and a university-wide teaching award.  So it is no surprise to find in his application materials a deep commitment to and patent skills in pedagogy, conceived very broadly, including also a wide range of presentations on pedagogical issues.

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Tue, 11/14/2017 - 9:35am by Helen Cullyer.
Foreign Influences: Philosophy and the Circulation of Knowledge in Antiquity
 
Interuniversity Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy
 
Montreal (Université du Québec à Montréal), October 24-26, 2018
 
How did Greek and Roman philosophers react to “foreign influences,” or “foreigners” (xenoi)? Did Greek and Roman philosophy and literature promote a stereotypical notion of the other, or do we always find different approaches to foreignness? Are stereotypes and prejudices the most common features of ancient representations of foreigners? When philosophers strive to expand the body of knowledge of their time, are they open or closed to the input that may come from other populations?
 
The Greek concept of the “foreigner” (xenos) is rather wide-ranging, as is clear from Socrates’ plea to his judges at the beginning of Plato’s Apology, that they tolerate his simple language as they would tolerate a foreigner from Ionia speaking the dialect of that region.
 
View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 11/13/2017 - 12:40pm by Erik Shell.
Virgil Reading the Aeneid to Augustus, Octavia, and Livia

New ideas customarily enter the classroom in a kind of scholarly trickle-down, from the university to daily educational practice. Think of the New Criticism of the 1950s, social history, or backward design. The phenomenon in Latin versification known as the “golden line” represents a striking example of the reverse: an idea generated in the classroom and resisted by the academy for decades, if not centuries, before becoming mainstream in erudite classical scholarship.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 11/13/2017 - 12:00am by Kenneth Mayer.

Thirteenth Annual Marquette Summer Seminar on  Aristotle and the Aristotelian Tradition 

25-27 June 2018

http://academic.mu.edu/taylorr/Midwest-Seminar/2018_Summer_Conference_1.html
 

This Conference is intended to provide a formal occasion and central location for philosophers and scholars of the Midwest region (and elsewhere) to present and discuss their current work on Aristotle and his interpreters in ancient and medieval philosophy.

PRESENTERS: Established Scholars: send a title and tentative abstract; Graduate Students: send a title, abstract and have your faculty advisor or dissertation director email indicating that you are doing professional level work. (This need not be a full recommendation.)  Send applications to: Owen.Goldin@Marquette.edu

CLOSING DATE FOR SUBMISSIONS: March 1, 2018

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 11/10/2017 - 12:33pm by .

The Eighth International Colloquium, organized by the Centro de Estudios Helénicos, Facultad de Humanidades y Ciencias de la Educación, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Argentina, will be held from 26th to 29th June 2018.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 11/10/2017 - 12:27pm by .

Lyric Beyond Lyric: ‘Submerged’ traditions, generic interactions, and later receptions

King’s College London, 24th May 2018

Organisers: Chiara Ciampa, Antonio Genova, Francesca Modini

As early as the Hellenistic period, the study of ancient Greek lyric poetry was identified most predominantly with the study of the nine, major canonical lyric poets and their texts. This process saw the redefinition of lyric as genre and the crystallisation of a lyric canon. The postclassical condition of lyric also influenced its Latin reception and adaptation, as it became an authoritative model for Roman poetry. The existence of an established canon, however, has often pushed to the side-lines of the lyric realm other ‘minor’ poets and song traditions. At the same time, the incorporation of lyric in other genres has been primarily acknowledged in order to detect quotations of poems or as a source of biographical information about poets. More recent scholarship, however, has broadened these narrow views of lyric by exploring the performative context and the socio-political dimension of lyric genres. Archaic song culture has been studied more and more with attention being paid both to the broader cultural discourses that lyric negotiated and to its interactions with other performative occasions and textual traditions. Equally, marginal lyric poets and texts have increasingly attracted scholarly attention.      

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 11/10/2017 - 11:59am by Erik Shell.

Please note that the deadline for Early Registration rates for the 2018 AIA/SCS Annual Meeting in Boston is today, November 10th.

You can register on this page.

---

(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Fri, 11/10/2017 - 9:38am by Erik Shell.

Pages

Latest Stories

Calls for Papers
Ancient Greek and Roman Painting and the Digital Humanities
Calls for Papers
Boston University Graduate Student Conference
Awards and Fellowships
The University of Texas at Austin
Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings

© 2017, Society for Classical Studies Privacy Policy