Annual Meeting Message from Michele Renee Salzman

Dear Attendees:

The 2018 SCS-AIA Meeting in Boston is just a month away! The Program Committee has worked hard to put together a rewarding and stimulating meeting and, as Vice President for Programs, I am particularly pleased by the growing number of panels – some 18 were accepted for the Boston meeting, an increase by three over last year. I want now to call your attention to a few of the exciting events that are planned.

President S. Georgia Nugent will focus attention on the “The PhD Today: This Is Your Brain on Classics.” Her presidential panel on Friday, January 5, from 5-6 pm brings together three graduates of Classics PhD programs who have elected career paths in law, technology, and secondary school teaching. They will discuss why and how they transitioned from the traditional expectation of a career in college teaching, as well as how their graduate study in classics affects their lives today. In her presidential address on Friday, January 5, from 6-7 pm, entitled “Chiron Meets Charon: On Crossing Over to the Dark Side,” president Nugent will reflect on the transition from professoriate to presidency and the invaluable lessons that study of the classics provides. This address will take place during the Plenary Session, at which SCS awards will be presented.

This presidential panel and address is one part of a three-pronged initiative during the annual meeting in order to highlight differing career possibilities open to Classics PhD’s. A special Career Networking event will take place on Saturday, January 6, from 12-2pm. This will bring together Classics PhD holders now working today in a variety of fields in who will be available to discuss career paths with interested meeting attendees.

The SCS Program Committee invites you to attend a special panel in Boston that will address a significant, contemporary issue: how do the political and rhetorical theories and practices of the ancient world illuminate current developments? The panel, "Rhetoric: Then and Now," will take place on Saturday, January 7. from 5-6:45. The panel includes four Classicists whose research addresses ancient rhetoric directly – Professors Joy Connolly, Curtis Dozier, Johanna Hanink, and Dan-el Padilla Peralta; in addition, we have invited a special guest, Mark Thompson, President and CEO of the New York Times and former Director General of the BBC. Thompson is the author of "Enough Said: What's Gone Wrong with the Language of Politics?" (St. Martin's Press, 2016), and has been a visiting professor of Rhetoric and the Art of Public Persuasion at the University of Oxford. His background and research adds a unique contemporary dimension to this panel for which Paul Allen Miller, Carolina Distinguished Professor at the University of South Carolina, will be the presider. After their presentations, there will be ample for discussion in what we hope will be a lively interchange. And for those of you who cannot be there in person, we plan to film this event and post it on the SCS YouTube page.

I look forward to seeing as many of you as possible in Boston. After the meetings, the SCS/AIA will distribute a survey to assess your views on the program. We want to encourage dialogue at the meetings and afterwards.  As I noted, we will be filming the “Rhetoric: Then and Now Panel” to encourage discussion. If you use Twitter, remember to use the conference hashtag #aiascs!

Michele Renee Salzman
Vice President for Programs, SCS

---

(Photo: "Empty Boardroom" by Reynermedia, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

Categories

Follow SCS News for information about the SCS and all things classical.

Use this field to search SCS News
Select a category from this list to limit the content on this page.

This article was originally published in Amphora 11.1. It has been edited slightly to adhere to current SCS blog conventions.

At the entrance of the maximum security prison where I taught Greek tragedy was a wooden plaque in the shape of a shield. It was emblazoned with a motto: Non sum qualis eram. Apart from its incongruity in this place of no Latin and less Greek, the motto struck me as equally a declaration of failure and of hope. The men inside were not what they once were. What were they now?

I knew very little about my students at Cheshire Correctional Institute. I’d been told that over 100 inmates had applied to take classes through Wesleyan University’s Center for Prison Education (CPE).[1] Only eighteen had been accepted after tests and interviews with Wesleyan faculty members, CPE staff, and prison administrators. The men had widely differing educational backgrounds, but had proved that they could succeed at Wesleyan course work: biochemistry, essay writing, sociology, and philosophy. By the second year of the pilot program, 2011, when I taught, the cohort had lost only two. Of the remaining sixteen, thirteen were African-American.  

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 11/06/2017 - 12:00am by Elizabeth Bobrick.

The Women's Classical Caucus (WCC) is undertaking a major initiative to address all forms of harassment in the field of Classics.  As part of this initiative, the WCC leadership has begun to collaborate with the SCS Committee on Gender and Sexuality in the Profession, and Vice President for Professional Matters, Barbara Gold.  The first result of this collaboration is the following statement addressing harassment, bullying, and intimidation at the Annual Meeting. This statement has been approved by the SCS Board of Directors. 

Statement on Harassment

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Sun, 11/05/2017 - 7:37am by Helen Cullyer.

The deadline for graduate students and contingent faculty to submit applications for travel stipends has now passed and all recipients of travel stipends have been notified of their awards.  However, the Society is now accepting applications from members attending the meeting for funds to support the costs of childcare or care of other dependents during the conference in Boston. The amount awarded will depend on the degree of need and the number of applicants.

Notification of subsidies will be sent to applicants by December 7th. Please note that applications should be made in US Dollars. Please send the information requested below to Helen Cullyer (xd@classicalstudies.org) by NOVEMBER 30th, 2017.

Name:

Mailing address:

E-mail:

Institutional affiliation (if any):

Title of position:

Reason for attending Annual Meeting:

Amount of funds requested and brief summary of childcare / dependent care arrangements:

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Sun, 11/05/2017 - 7:26am by Helen Cullyer.

Platonic dialectic – inquiring into the nature of things

31st May - 2nd June, 2018
Department of Philosophy, University of Bergen

Confirmed keynote speakers:
Walter Mesch (University of Münster/Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität, Münster)
Vasilis Politis (Trinity College Dublin)
Pauliina Remes (Uppsala University)

The last decades of Platonic scholarship bear witness to a radical change in the way Plato’s dialogues are generally read. The developmental approach that dominated scholarship in the 20th century is now questioned by a growing number of scholars, and this has stimulated a renewed interest both in the question how the dialogues are best approached and in the approaches to Plato adopted by older Platonists (i.e. before the 19th century especially). This change, however, has still to prompt a revision of the way Platonic dialectic is approached. The assumption that Plato’s conception of dialectic underwent a significant development, starting from a Socratic ideal of philosophy as dialogue and culminating in a more Aristotelian, scientific ideal, still dominates scholarship on the subject. The aim of the conference is to consider, and potentially question, this assumption in order to stimulate discussions about the nature of Platonic dialectic.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 11/03/2017 - 10:04am by Erik Shell.

Registration for the Career Networking event at the 2018 Annual Meeting is now open. This special event is co-sponsored by SCS and the Paideia Institute.  Graduate students and contingent faculty interested in careers outside of academia are encouraged to attend.  There is no extra charge for this event but space is limited.

Registered attendees of the 2018 meeting can sign up for this event by filling out this form. Sign up will be open until November 22nd or close sooner if the event reaches capacity before that date. 

---

(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 10/31/2017 - 8:10am by Erik Shell.

A Stream on “Continuity of Culture Between Ancient and Modern Greece”
as part of the
16th Annual International Conference on History & Archaeology: From Ancient to Modern
2-5 July 2018, Athens, Greece
Sponsored by the Athens Journal of History

The History Unit of ATINER will hold A Stream on “Continuity of Culture Between Ancient and Modern Greece”, 2-5 July 2018, Athens, Greece as part of the 16th Annual International Conference on History & Archaeology: From Ancient to Modern sponsored by the Athens Journal of Sciences.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 10/30/2017 - 11:46am by Erik Shell.

Abstracts for all papers slated to be presented at the 149th annual meeting in Boston are now published online.

You can view the abstracts here.

---

(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 10/30/2017 - 9:42am by Erik Shell.
Sketchbook: Souvenir of Naples

On a summer night in 64 CE a conflagration that would be remembered as the Great Fire of Rome began somewhere in the tightly-packed shops and streets around the Circus Maximus. “A disaster,” the historian Tacitus called it, “graver and more dreadful than all that have befallen this city by the violence of fire” (Annals 15.38). His account goes on to describe panic and destruction, followed by rumors, resentment, and rebuilding. Ancient responses to disasters like these are the focus of a new first-year studies course at the University of Texas at Austin, for which I am the teaching assistant. The following is a reflection on what we might do as classics and ancient history teachers to aid our students in dealing with 2017’s brutal hurricane season, in this year that Tacitus might have called “rich in catastrophes” (opimum casibus, Histories 1.2).

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 10/30/2017 - 12:00am by Jane Millar.

Call for Papers

5000 Years of Comments: The Development of Commentary from Ancient Mesopotamia to the Age of Information

August 7-10, 2018

Sponsored and hosted by the Center for Hellenic Studies
Organized by Joel P. Christensen (Brandeis University) and Jacqueline Vayntrub (Brandeis University)

Commentary on the written word is nearly as old as writing itself and has developed alongside scholarship, literature and the writing cultures in critical and influential ways. As an activity, commentary has helped define categories of textuality and literature. As a type of discourse, commentary has been shaped over millennia by emerging technologies, from clay tablets to multi-user digital interfaces.

This two-day conference seeks to bring together specialists and investigators from various fields who are interested in the history of commentary and its study, in its theoretical underpinnings and its effects, and in exploring new forms commentary has taken in the information age. All fields of inquiry are open, but we are particularly interested in assembling papers that draw on the history of philology from the Ancient Near East (Mesopotamia through Biblical philology) through Classical Greece and Rome in antiquity, the middle ages, and reflecting on this history in light of the emergence of modern Digital Humanities. 

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 10/26/2017 - 8:16am by Erik Shell.

This is a reminder that the deadline for the SCS's TLL Fellowship is November 15

You can read the posting for this fellowship here, and learn more about the program on this page.

---

(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Wed, 10/25/2017 - 8:44am by Erik Shell.

Pages

Latest Stories

Calls for Papers
Ancient Greek and Roman Painting and the Digital Humanities
Calls for Papers
Boston University Graduate Student Conference
Awards and Fellowships
The University of Texas at Austin
Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings

© 2017, Society for Classical Studies Privacy Policy