Annual Meeting Message from Michele Renee Salzman

Dear Attendees:

The 2018 SCS-AIA Meeting in Boston is just a month away! The Program Committee has worked hard to put together a rewarding and stimulating meeting and, as Vice President for Programs, I am particularly pleased by the growing number of panels – some 18 were accepted for the Boston meeting, an increase by three over last year. I want now to call your attention to a few of the exciting events that are planned.

President S. Georgia Nugent will focus attention on the “The PhD Today: This Is Your Brain on Classics.” Her presidential panel on Friday, January 5, from 5-6 pm brings together three graduates of Classics PhD programs who have elected career paths in law, technology, and secondary school teaching. They will discuss why and how they transitioned from the traditional expectation of a career in college teaching, as well as how their graduate study in classics affects their lives today. In her presidential address on Friday, January 5, from 6-7 pm, entitled “Chiron Meets Charon: On Crossing Over to the Dark Side,” president Nugent will reflect on the transition from professoriate to presidency and the invaluable lessons that study of the classics provides. This address will take place during the Plenary Session, at which SCS awards will be presented.

This presidential panel and address is one part of a three-pronged initiative during the annual meeting in order to highlight differing career possibilities open to Classics PhD’s. A special Career Networking event will take place on Saturday, January 6, from 12-2pm. This will bring together Classics PhD holders now working today in a variety of fields in who will be available to discuss career paths with interested meeting attendees.

The SCS Program Committee invites you to attend a special panel in Boston that will address a significant, contemporary issue: how do the political and rhetorical theories and practices of the ancient world illuminate current developments? The panel, "Rhetoric: Then and Now," will take place on Saturday, January 7. from 5-6:45. The panel includes four Classicists whose research addresses ancient rhetoric directly – Professors Joy Connolly, Curtis Dozier, Johanna Hanink, and Dan-el Padilla Peralta; in addition, we have invited a special guest, Mark Thompson, President and CEO of the New York Times and former Director General of the BBC. Thompson is the author of "Enough Said: What's Gone Wrong with the Language of Politics?" (St. Martin's Press, 2016), and has been a visiting professor of Rhetoric and the Art of Public Persuasion at the University of Oxford. His background and research adds a unique contemporary dimension to this panel for which Paul Allen Miller, Carolina Distinguished Professor at the University of South Carolina, will be the presider. After their presentations, there will be ample for discussion in what we hope will be a lively interchange. And for those of you who cannot be there in person, we plan to film this event and post it on the SCS YouTube page.

I look forward to seeing as many of you as possible in Boston. After the meetings, the SCS/AIA will distribute a survey to assess your views on the program. We want to encourage dialogue at the meetings and afterwards.  As I noted, we will be filming the “Rhetoric: Then and Now Panel” to encourage discussion. If you use Twitter, remember to use the conference hashtag #aiascs!

Michele Renee Salzman
Vice President for Programs, SCS

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(Photo: "Empty Boardroom" by Reynermedia, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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(From our colleagues at Wadham College)

It is with great sadness that we announce the sudden death of Emeritus Fellow and Classicist James Morwood, at the age of 73, while on holiday in Greece. Details of a memorial service will be published in due course.

Below is a list of his accomplishments, adapted from his biography at Wadham College:

James Morwood was elected to a Fellowship at Wadham College in 1996, where he taught and served as Dean of Degrees, Steward of Common Room, and Dean (the last post from 2000 to 2006). He became an Emeritus Fellow in 2006 and was the Editor of the Wadham Gazette.

James was educated at Peterhouse, Cambridge, where he sat Part I of the Classical Tripos and Part II of the English Tripos. After a year at Merton College, Oxford on the course for the Diploma of Education, he went to Harrow School in September 1966 to teach Classics and English. He spent 30 years at Harrow, the last seventeen of them as Head of Classics. He was deeply involved in school journalism and drama, working with Richard Curtis and Ben Cumberbatch among many others. He was librarian for more than eleven years, and sat on and later chaired the school’s Treasures Committee, a body which brought into existence the Old Speech Room Gallery.

In 1996 he moved to Oxford University and took up the post of Grocyn Lecturer in the Classics Faculty and served for a year as President of the Oxford Philological Society.

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Mon, 09/18/2017 - 1:50pm by Erik Shell.
Aeneas Departs from Carthage (Aeneid, Book IV)

Intermediate Latin students typically encounter Latin poetry for the first time with Vergil’s Aeneid. After a brief tutorial on the rules and patterns of dactylic hexameter, they plunge in with arma virumque cano. They learn scansion not only for the sake of tradition and proper understanding of the poem, but also so that they can appreciate its rhythms and artistry—the same reasons English teachers have for teaching their students iambic pentameter for Shakespeare. The symphony of “longs and shorts” can seem forbidding to students at first, and the remedy for this is most often simply practice. Today, given the convenience of phone and tablet apps, and their potential to transform idle moments of otium into more productive ones, the Pericles Group, LLC has created the Latin Scansion App to help Latin AP students practice scanning Vergil. Aulus Gellius, who scraped together his Attic Nights from omnia subsiciva et subsecundaria tempora (“all my spare and third rate time” praef. 23), would no doubt approve.

The title screen has three main buttons: Marathon, Timed, and Achievements. “Marathon” allows the user to select a range of lines from the AP syllabus and to scan them in an untimed session.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 09/18/2017 - 12:00am by Patrick Paul Hogan.

Classical Representations in Popular Culture

The Southwest Popular / American Culture Association (SWPACA) will once again be sponsoring sessions on CLASSICAL REPRESENTATIONS IN POPULAR CULTURE at their 39th annual conference, February 7-10, 2018 at Hyatt Regency Hotel and Conference Center in beautiful Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Papers on any aspect of Greek and Roman antiquity in contemporary culture are eligible for consideration.

Potential topics include:

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 09/15/2017 - 3:23pm by Erik Shell.

Tacitus’ Wonders
Conference at Victoria University of Wellington, 27-29 August 2018
First call for papers

Readers have been attracted to the remarkable and wondrous, the admirable and the uncanny in Tacitus. But in order to appreciate what is mirum or novum, we also need to understand the apparently mundane material between the monstra. Tacitus famously derides the praises of new public buildings as a topic more worthy of the daily gazette than illustres annales (A. 13.31.1); his own criteria for selection, however, and his own judgments on what is worthy of note, have often differed in interesting ways from the preoccupations of his readers.

Abstracts (250 words) are invited on the topic of Tacitus’ wonders.
Submissions on comparative material are very much welcome.

Reflection is invited on the consequences of different methods of dividing or reconciling historical events and historiographical representation, e.g. Woodman (1993), O’Gorman (2001), Haynes (2003), and Sailor (2008). In preparing abstracts, it will be helpful to consider the challenge extended by Dench (in Feldherr, 2009), the ‘awkward question’ of whether the much admired Tacitean text ‘represents anything other than itself’. Papers treating the Classical tradition, reception and history of scholarship are welcome.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 09/15/2017 - 1:38pm by Erik Shell.

Human | Nature: Environmental Humanities in Historical Perspective

March 23-24, 2018

The Ohio State University
Columbus, Ohio

Keynote Speaker: Timothy Saunders, Volda University College

Opening Remarks: Chris Otter, The Ohio State University

The Ohio State University Department of Classics, in collaboration with OSU’s Discovery Theme for Environmental Humanities and the Humanities Institute, is proud to announce its 15th annual graduate student colloquium.

A sense of urgency characterizes contemporary discussions about ecological welfare and anthropogenic effects on the non-human environment. At the core of this discourse lie questions with a long history of artistic, philosophical, political and religious expression. The proper management of space and resources, the negotiation of shifting boundaries between the “human” and “natural” worlds (however one chooses to define these categories), as well as the contemplation of humanity’s place among the living and nonliving co-inhabitants of Earth are all pursuits basic to human survival and livelihood. Moreover, the ways earlier generations found to represent the natural world they experienced and their human community's place within it have shaped the way we think and talk about such matters today.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 09/15/2017 - 1:06pm by Erik Shell.

Digital Publication in Mediterranean Archaeology
Current Practice and Common Goals

A conference organized by the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World and The Shelby White and Leon Levy Program for Archaeological Publications, in partnership with the Archaeological Institute of America
Institute for the Study of the Ancient World

15 E. 84th Street
New York, NY
Friday, October 20, 2017
9am-5pm

Speaker list

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Fri, 09/15/2017 - 12:56pm by Erik Shell.

“Deconstructing the Open Greek and Latin Project: The First Thousand Years of Greek”

An AIA-SCS Pre-Meeting Workshop, presented in coordination with the SCS 

January 3, 2018, 9:00 to 5:00, Tufts University, Medford, MA

Interested in open access, the digital humanities, or conducting digital scholarship in your research and/or teaching?  Aren't sure what these topics have to do with classics or archaeology, or even how to get started?  Then, please consider joining us next January 3 at the AIA-SCS pre-meeting workshop "Deconstructing the Open Greek and Latin Project"!

In this workshop, partners from the Perseus Digital Library, the Harvard Library and Harvard Center for Hellenic Studies, the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, the University of Leipzig, Mount Allison University, and the University of Virginia Library will come together to demonstrate research tools, explain how to involve students in digital scholarship, provide open data for hands-on exploration from the Open Greek and Latin Project, as well as create a growing and supportive open access community.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Fri, 09/15/2017 - 9:23am by Erik Shell.

International Association for Presocratic Studies

Sixth Biennial Conference: 25-29 June 2018

Delphi, Greece: European Cultural Centre of Delphi

Chair of Organizing Committee: Richard McKirahan

The International Association for Presocratic Studies (IAPS, founded in 2008) announces its Sixth Biennial Conference. The meeting will take place at the European Cultural Centre of Delphi, Greece 25-29 June 2018.

IAPS understands “Presocratics” to be the figures for whom either fragments of their work or relevant testimonia are collected in Hermann Diels’ Die Fragmente der Vorsokratiker (6th edn. 1951, edited by Walther Kranz). IAPS welcomes presentations on philosophical, philological, textual, doxographical, scientific, historical, literary and religious topics having to do with the Presocratics, on connections between Presocratic thought and other figures (e.g., the Sophists)and other areas of intellectual activity (e.g., mathematics, medicine or music), and on the reception of Presocratic thought in antiquity and later times.

IAPS welcomes participation from scholars at all stages of their careers, from graduate students to senior figures in the field.

To receive further information about the conference, please send a message with the title “IAPS 6” to Prof. Richard McKirahan <rmckirahan@pomona.edu>.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Tue, 09/12/2017 - 11:57am by Erik Shell.

Call for Papers
Workshop: Language and Reality in Ancient Philosophy

Tuesday 16th January 2018, Faculty of Philosophy, University of Groningen, The Netherlands

Keynote speaker: David Ebrey (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin).

Ancient philosophers gave significant attention to the nature of language and its relation to reality. This workshop aims to stimulate scholarly exchange on the issue(s) and invites abstracts dealing with ancient philosophy of language, ancient metaphysics, and the relation between language and reality. Abstracts of up to 1000 words suitable for presentations of up to 40 minutes should be submitted by Saturday 21st October, 2017 to T.Nawar@rug.nl.

- The subject line of the email should read: 'SUBMISSION: Language and Reality in Ancient Philosophy (GRONINGEN)'.
- The abstract should be attached as a .PDF file.
- The abstract should be suitable for anonymous review.
- The author's name, affiliation, and email address should be specified in the email to which the abstract is attached, but not in the abstract itself.

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View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 09/11/2017 - 12:39pm by Erik Shell.

Deadlines Extended Because of Severe Weather Conditions

  • All paper ballots received by 5pm on Monday, September 18 will be counted in the elections.  Paper ballots do not have to be received on Friday, September 15.

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View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 09/11/2017 - 10:08am by Erik Shell.

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