Aristotle's Politics

The Philosophy Department at Stanford University invites you to attend a two-day conference on Aristotle's Politics in Stanford, California on March 9-10 in Building 60, Room 109. Please register for the conference at http://tinyurl.com/yc48ecd8. Papers will be pre-circulated once available. 
 
Speakers:

Pierre Destrée
Associate Research Professor, Department of Philosophy, FNRS/University of Louvain

Terence Irwin
Faculty of Philosophy, Radcliffe Humanities, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Oxford University

Mariska Leunissen
Associate Professor, Department of Philosophy, UNC Chapel Hill

Thornton C. Lockwood
Associate Professor of Philosophy, Department of Philosophy and Political Science, Quinnipiac University

Malcom Schofield
Professor Emeritus of Ancient Philosophy, University of Cambridge

The conference is sponsored in part by the Towards Citizenship Fund and the McCoy Family Center for Ethics in Society.

(Photo: "Empty Boardroom" by Reynermedia, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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The deadline to apply for the TLL Fellowship is November 16, 2018. The application includes many parts, and so should be started early.

Applications must be received by the deadline of Friday, November 16, 2018, at 5:00 p.m., Eastern Time. Applications should be submitted as e-mail attachments to Dr. Helen Cullyer, Executive Director, Society for Classical Studies, xd@classicalstudies.org.

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Fri, 10/05/2018 - 1:14pm by Erik Shell.

Teachers of Classics have been impacted by hurricane Florence.

ACL and SCS are launching a joint initiative that will help connect institutions in need with our members who are able to offer assistance.

If you are a teacher or faculty member at an institution whose academic programs have been interrupted, suspended, or impacted by the recent hurricane, you may fill out the form linked below to request financial assistance that will accelerate the recovery of your classes and programs. You need not be an ACL or SCS member to request help.

REQUEST FOR ASSISTANCE

Once we have received your form, an ACL or SCS staff member will contact you to verify your identity and the nature of your request. We will then publish verified requests on our websites and via our social media accounts so that our members can reach out to institutions in need and offer direct financial help. We feel that this is the quickest way of getting funds to the schools, colleges, and universities that need them.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Fri, 10/05/2018 - 10:15am by Erik Shell.
YouTube-TedEd screenshot from “A glimpse of teenage life in ancient Rome” animated by Cognitive Media and written and narrated by Ray Laurence (Image under a CC BY -- NC -- ND 4.0 International license).

In order to prepare for the SCS’s upcoming sesquicentennial at the annual meeting in San Diego from January 3-6, 2019, the SCS blog is highlighting panels, keynotes, and workshops from the schedule. Today we highlight the Animated Antiquity: A Showcase of Cartoon Representations of Ancient Greece and Rome workshop by interviewing Ray Laurence (Macquarie University) about his work using animation to teach Roman daily life.



Cartoons and Animated Films written by Ray Laurence:

A Glimpse of Teenage Life in Ancient Rome

Four Sisters in Ancient Rome

Roman Nursing Goddess – The Dea Nutrix

What is Humanities Research at the University of Kent?

How Immigration Shaped Britain – part 1

A Day in the Life of a Roman Client

Q. How was the idea of an educational cartoon first developed and pitched?

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 10/04/2018 - 2:12pm by Sarah Bond.

Last year the Classical Studies Department at the University of Michigan announced the launch of its Bridge MA, a fully funded program designed to prepare scholars from diverse backgrounds for entry into one of Michigan’s Ph.D. programs in Classical Studies or related fields. There are few programs like it, particularly at public universities. One of its architects, Professor Sara Ahbel-Rappe, recently received a competitive award for her diversity efforts. I connected with her along with Dr. Young Richard Kim, the Onassis Foundation’s new Director of Educational Programs, to discuss Michigan’s diversity efforts and its partnership with the Onassis Foundation.

View full article. | Posted in on Wed, 10/03/2018 - 6:04am by Arum Park.
April 11th-13th, 2019 – University of Kentucky – Lexington, Kentucky
Kentucky Foreign Language Conference, Classics Section

Deadline for Abstract Submission: November 12th, 2018, 11:59 PM EST

Paper presentations are 20 minutes followed by a 10-minute question & answer session. In addition to individual abstracts for paper presentations, proposals for panels of 5 papers will be considered. Papers are welcomed from graduate students, post-docs, and faculty. Abstracts should be no more than 250 words and the deadline is November 12th, 2018 before midnight EST. Online submissions https://kflc.as.uky.edu/

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 10/02/2018 - 9:19am by Erik Shell.
150th Logo

The Society for Classical Studies (SCS) has been awarded a grant of $150,000 by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The grant will advance two strategic priorities of the organization: (a) engaging a public audience in the appreciation and critical discussion of the ancient world and its legacy; and (b) addressing diversity and inclusion in the field of Classics within the US and globally.

The grant will support a consultant, who, as Public Engagement Coordinator, will document and evaluate public events planned for 2019, the Society's Sesquicentennial year; and plan and develop new public-facing programs and resources. The grant also includes a pool of funding for mini-grants for public programming in 2020. The grant will also provide support for: travel stipends for students from historically underrepresented minority groups and students committed to increasing diversity and inclusion within the field to attend the Society's upcoming annual meetings; events related to race, ethnicity, diversity, and inclusion at the meetings; and travel for invited speakers from Asia, Africa, and Latin America. As SCS approaches it Sesquicentennial year, this award will enable the Society to meet its short-term goals and build capacity for the longer term.


View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Fri, 09/28/2018 - 11:27am by Helen Cullyer.
Image of A.E. Stalling’s new book of poetry, Like, and a scarf with its cover printed on it (Image used by permission and taken by John Psaropoulos).

This month in her ‘art of translation’ column, Adrienne K.H. Rose interviews A.E. Stallings while in Pylos and then in Virginia. The two discuss the word choices made by translators, the surprising relevance of Archaic poetry in the tumultuous present era, and the effects of living life in a foreign language.

Q: How did you decide to study Classics?

Gradually, then suddenly—I didn't start taking Latin until college [at the University of Georgia], where I was initially an English and Music major, but I started with Latin 1, and just kept taking more and more Latin and Classics courses until finally the department (in particular Rick LaFleur, then Dept. head), gently suggested I change majors.

Q: Could you say a bit about the significance of learning Latin and Greek and translating Classics and its impact on you?

It changed my understanding of writing poetry for one thing.  As I've said elsewhere, I realized how contemporary Catullus sounded, but also that he was writing in very strict poetic forms.  I realized you could sound modern and scan. I realized that ancient poets often sounded more up-to-date to me than a lot of what I was reading in contemporary literary journals. It removed some anxiety I had about the modern literary scene.

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 09/27/2018 - 3:52pm by Adrienne K.H. Rose.

Below are the citations for the winners of our 2018 Charles J. Goodwin Award of Merit. Please join us in congratulating this year's winners.

Gil H. Renberg

Amy Richlin

Harriet I. Flower

Gil H. RenbergWhere Dreams May Come:  Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World.  Leiden:  Brill, 2017.

Sweet dreams, bad dreams, broken dreams, impossible dreams, dream jobs, dreams come true, dreamy dates, dream teams, the American dream, only in your dreams, dream on: dreams are among our most familiar experiences but wonderfully mysterious all the same. In modern times dreams tend to be something internal and personal, perhaps mere nonsense, perhaps an expression of wishes and fears conscious or unconscious. For classical peoples, dreams were something more, signs from outside, indeed an important channel for divine-human communication. And so incubation – sleeping in a place where dreams may come – was a multi-faceted practice throughout the ancient world from earliest times to late antiquity: a practice undertaken for therapy, for cures, for enlightenment, and for revelations.

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Thu, 09/27/2018 - 12:35pm by Erik Shell.

"Transforming Classics: 150 Years of Classical Studies in New York"

Tuesday, November 13, 2018, from 5:30pm to 7:45pm with a reception to follow
Hemmerdinger Hall, 32 Waverly Place
New York, NY 10003

Background

On November 13, 1868, a group of scholars resolved to form the American Philological Association (APA), now the Society for Classical Studies (SCS). The APA was originally a society for "lovers of philology."

Throughout the 150-year history of the APA/SCS, New York's scholars, teachers, students, and institutions have played a central role in developing and transforming our field.

Event

On November 13, 2018, the Society for Classical Studies, along with the Center for Ancient Studies, will present "Transforming Classics: 150 Years of Classical Studies in New York." Speakers will discuss how New York-based organizations and programs have: 

  1. shaped what counts as Classics;
  2. changed who gets to participate in and lead the field; and/or 
  3. opened up new directions that connect the study of the Greco-Roman world with other ancient and modern traditions

This event is free and open to the public. You can register by filing out this registration form.

Schedule

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Wed, 09/26/2018 - 12:18pm by Erik Shell.

The Shohet Scholars Grant Program of the International Catacomb Society is now accepting applications to the Shohet Scholars cohort of 2019-2020. Submission deadline is January 15, 2019 (11:59 p.m. EST).

This annual grant program funds research on the Ancient Mediterranean from the Hellenistic Era to the Early Middle Ages. Shohet Scholars may do their research in the fields of archeology, art history, classical studies, history, comparative religions, or related subjects. Of special interest are interdisciplinary projects that approach traditional topics from new perspectives.

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Wed, 09/26/2018 - 11:58am by Erik Shell.

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