Aristotle's Politics

The Philosophy Department at Stanford University invites you to attend a two-day conference on Aristotle's Politics in Stanford, California on March 9-10 in Building 60, Room 109. Please register for the conference at http://tinyurl.com/yc48ecd8. Papers will be pre-circulated once available. 
 
Speakers:

Pierre Destrée
Associate Research Professor, Department of Philosophy, FNRS/University of Louvain

Terence Irwin
Faculty of Philosophy, Radcliffe Humanities, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Oxford University

Mariska Leunissen
Associate Professor, Department of Philosophy, UNC Chapel Hill

Thornton C. Lockwood
Associate Professor of Philosophy, Department of Philosophy and Political Science, Quinnipiac University

Malcom Schofield
Professor Emeritus of Ancient Philosophy, University of Cambridge

The conference is sponsored in part by the Towards Citizenship Fund and the McCoy Family Center for Ethics in Society.

(Photo: "Empty Boardroom" by Reynermedia, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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NEH is offering emergency grants and the opportunity for affected institutions to repurpose existing grants.

For more information, visit the NEH announcement page.

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(Photo: "Logo of the United States National Endowment for the Humanities" by National Endowment for the Humanities, public domain, edited to fit thumbnail template)

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Fri, 09/08/2017 - 9:09am by Erik Shell.

"author.net"

a transdisciplinary conference on distributed authorship

UCLA, October 5-7 2018.
Co-Organizers, Francesca Martelli and Sean Gurd

DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACTS: January 15, 2018

Long associated with pre-modern cultures, the notion of “distributed authorship” still serves as a mainstay for the study of Classical antiquity, which takes 'Homer' as its foundational point of orientation, and which, like many other disciplines in the humanities, has extended its insights into the open-endedness of oral and performance traditions into its study of textual dynamics as well. The rise of genetic criticism within textual studies bears witness to this urge to fray perceptions of the hermetic closure of the written, and to expose the multiple strands of collaboration and revision that a text may contain. And the increasingly widespread use of the multitext in literary editions of authors from Homer to Joyce offers a material manifestation of this impulse to display the multiple different levels and modes of distribution at work in the authorial process. In many areas of the humanities that rely on traditional textual media, then, the distributed author is alive and well, and remains a current object of study.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 09/07/2017 - 2:12pm by Erik Shell.

Workshop: Creating a Digital Commentary for Teaching

Dickinson Latin Workshop
Saturday, October 21, 2017

Creating a Digital Commentary for Teaching
Bret Mulligan (Haverford College) and Chris Francese (Dickinson College)

Place: Dickinson College, Tome Hall 115, 10:00 a.m. — 5:00 p.m.

Do you write your own notes on Latin texts for your students? Are you frustrated with the limitations of Microsoft Word when it comes to parallel display of text, notes, and vocabulary? Now you can create attractive, usable reading texts online with vocabulary lists and notes simultaneously displayed, and the ability to include hyperlinks and add audio-visual material. This workshop will demonstrate and provide practice with a new plugin for the WordPress CMS that mimics the easy-to-read format of Dickinson College Commentaries. In addition, participants will see demonstrations of and practice using a variety of online tools that are helpful in the creation and annotation of reading texts: The Bridge for vocabulary list creation; DCC core vocabulary; Pleiades for geography; digitized grammars and reference works for simplifying annotations; Johan Winge’s macronizer; and others.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Thu, 09/07/2017 - 9:37am by Erik Shell.

The Pearson Fellowship Committee invites nominations for the 2018-2019 Lionel Pearson Fellowship, which seeks to contribute to the education of American- and Canadian-trained classicists by providing for a year of study at an English or Scottish university. The competition is open to outstanding students who have completed in academic year 2016-2017, or will complete in academic year 2017-2018, a B.A. in Greek, Latin, Classics, or closely related fields at any American or Canadian college or university.  Faculty should nominate students by October 2, 2017.  Click here to see full instructions and details of the Fellowship.

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(Photo: "library" by Viva Vivanista, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Thu, 09/07/2017 - 9:07am by Helen Cullyer.

3rd Annual University of Chicago Graduate Student Conference in Ancient Philosophy: Learning and Teaching in Ancient Thought

Date: April 13th-14th, 2018
Submission deadline: January 22nd, 2018

Keynote Speaker: David Bronstein (Georgetown University)

We invite graduate students to submit papers on learning and teaching in Ancient Greek and Roman philosophy. Potential topics include: the acquisition and transmission of knowledge, discovery, education, teachability, empirical vs. non-empirical forms of knowledge, innatism.

Approximately 5-6 presenters will be chosen. All papers accepted will be read in advance. Each presenter will have approximately an hour for discussion.

We will be able to provide partial compensation for travel expenses.

To propose a paper, send an abstract of 250-500 words to rhanlon11@uchicago.edu. To submit an abstract, email it with the subject heading “Ancient Philosophy Conference Submission.” In order to facilitate blind reviewing, pleased provide your contact information in the body of the email but do not include any identifying information in the attached document. Documents should be submitted in .doc, .docx, or .pdf form.

To submit your paper or ask any questions, please email Rory Hanlon at rhanlon11@uchicago.edu.

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View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 09/06/2017 - 8:59am by Erik Shell.

Registration for the Joint AIA/SCS Annual Meeting is now open!

To register online, click here. For other important information, such as the preliminary program, see the "Essential Links" section on our Annual Meeting page here.

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 09/05/2017 - 10:05am by Erik Shell.
Partial reconstruction of one of the geminated temples which opened onto the forum, Glanum

As an amateur photographer and ancient history enthusiast, I have spent countless hours exploring ancient sites throughout the Mediterranean. In the process, I accumulated a very large number of photographs that I wanted to archive, edit, and share with the world. In 2009, after 3 years of traveling, I decided to start uploading my photos to Flickr. This photo-sharing site was founded in Canada in 2004, and acquired by Yahoo and moved to the US in 2005. As of fall 2016, the site reportedly had 122 million users in 63 countries and was the repository of 10 billion images, with a million more added on an average day. Size and popularity, however, were not the reasons why I chose Flickr. I wanted a photo site that would allow me to edit, annotate, organize, and store my images. I was also looking for a platform that would allow users to easily browse and download my photos if desired; Flickr offered all of this.

View full article. | Posted in on Tue, 09/05/2017 - 12:00am by Carole Raddato.

The Department of Classics, Philosophy, and Religion at the University of Mary Washington is saddened to announce the passing of Robert F. Boughner on August 30, at the age of 71.

Bob did his undergraduate studies in Classics at Duke, and his M.A. and Ph.D. at Johns Hopkins. His favorite author to teach was Catullus.  He taught for several years at University of Maryland and worked as a Humanities administrator at the NEH before joining the Mary Washington faculty in 1983.  He was a highly popular and engaging lecturer, and taught a wide range of courses in Classical Civilization, Latin, and Greek.

Bob served as chair of the Department of Classics, Philosophy, and Religion from 1990 to 1996, when he left to become Dean of the American College in Athens. He returned to the United States as Chair of the Department of Humanities at the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia, from which he recently retired, moving to Takoma Park, MD.  We learned of his death from a friend and former student who relayed to us that it was unexpected.  Bob specified that he wanted no memorial or service, but we remember him with great fondness in CPR.

Former Executive Director Adam Blistein has asked us to add these remarks to the notice from Mary Washington

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Fri, 09/01/2017 - 11:35am by Erik Shell.

This is a reminder that the deadline for nominating a teacher for the SCS Excellence in Precollegiate Teaching Award is September 8th, 2017

Teachers, full- or part-time, of grades K-12 in schools in the United States and Canada who at the time of the application teach at least one class of Latin, Greek, or classics at the K-12 level are eligible. Membership in the SCS is not required.

To see a full description, visit the main webpage for the award here: https://classicalstudies.org/awards-and-fellowships/scs-awards-excellenc...

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Fri, 09/01/2017 - 11:25am by Erik Shell.

From Democracy to Authoritarianism: The Death of the Roman Republic
Thursday, March 29, 2018   7:00–8:30 pm EDT
Leader: Michael Fontaine, Professor of Classics, Cornell University

Comparisons between ancient Rome and the United States are suddenly all around us. Why, and what do they portend? Right around the time Jesus was born, ancient Rome’s 500-year-old republic failed. Its traditions of representative elections, checks and balances, tolerance, and freedoms of movement and expression were swept away, never to recover. In their place rose the Roman Empire, an increasingly authoritarian and Orwellian structure that saw state-sponsored persecutions of minorities, artists, and dissidents at home, endless foreign wars abroad, and, eventually, even the requirement for all citizens to believe certain theological propositions. How did Rome transform in this way, and why did it never go back? This webinar will highlight political institutions, imperial expansion, the breakdown of republican institutions, the civil wars, and a few personalities whose names, 2000 years on, are still familiar to us all.

You can register for this webinar here: https://attendee.gototraining.com/r/2199485434755233026

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View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Wed, 08/30/2017 - 9:43am by Erik Shell.

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