SCS News

Follow SCS News for information about the SCS and all things classical.

Use this field to search SCS News
Select a category from this list to limit the content on this page.
Medieval Imagery

This article was originally published in Amphora 12.1. It has been edited slightly to adhere to current SCS blog conventions.

This spring I was fortunate to hear an interesting panel discussion—stand-up-and-take-notice interesting—at the Medieval Academy of America’s annual meeting, hosted by Notre Dame University. The panelists’ observations seemed to me relevant to the SCS both as demonstrating additional kinds of outreach but more importantly as discussing the peculiar period higher education now finds itself in, and what might be done about that at every level, from junior scholar to dean. Officially the panelists spoke in the context of medieval studies, but they mentioned classical studies at different points, and the vast majority of their comments would be applicable to nearly any department in the humanities, especially those involved with “old stuff” or those commonly regarded by the public as recondite. In short, if your discipline has a saying about it on the model of “It’s all [your day job] to me,” you’ll want to listen to the presentations by these three scholars.

View full article. | Posted in on Wed, 02/22/2017 - 8:55am by Ellen Bauerle.

Arabia in the Classical Sources

King Abdulaziz Foundation for Research and Archives (Ad-Darah) invites scholars to participate in the symposium "Arabia in the Classical Sources" which will be held in 21st - 23rd November 2017 in Riyadh.

The symposium welcome papers on subjects related to the Arabs and Arabia in classical sources. Topics will include, but will not necessarily limited to, the concepts of Arabs and Arabia, the sources of classical authors on Arabia, social life and economy of Arabia in the ancient times, flora and fauna of Arabia in classical writings, and classical authors' influence on western thoughts on ancient and modern Arabia.

Invitation has been sent to scholars specialized in the history of ancient Arabia during the Greek and Roman period to contribute to the symposium. Serious participants are welcome to submit new ideas and approaches to the symposium according to the terms and conditions of the attached first circular.
All correspondence should be addressed to prof. Al-Abduljabbar, the supervisor of the symposium and the "Arabia in the Classical Sources" project, at e-mail: aajabbar@me.com or arabiacs@darah.org.sa by April 16, 2017.

---

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 02/16/2017 - 12:09pm by Erik Shell.

Virtue, Skill and Practical Reason
Call for Abstracts

Keynote Speakers:
Prof. Julia Annas (University of Arizona)
Prof. Michael Thompson (University of Pittsburgh)
Prof. Rachel Barney (University of Toronto)

Aristotle drew an analogy between the acquisition of virtue and the acquisition of various skills such as archery and playing the lute. Since that time there has been substantial debate on how seriously one should take that analogy. In Intelligent Virtue (2011) Julia Annas has made a powerful case for taking it very seriously, whereas others are more cautious.

This conference aims to bring together philosophers working in the virtue tradition, in particular those working in ancient and moral philosophy, to discuss the complex relationships between skill and virtue. There appears to be a consensus that the acquisition of virtue is part of the broader acquisition of practical reasonableness, but there the consensus ends.

High quality abstracts are invited in any area of virtue theory, including but not limited to virtue ethics and virtue epistemology. Papers can have a historical focus, or they can be organised thematically. Papers from a non-Western perspective are welcome.

The conference will be held from Friday 25th to Sunday 27th August 2017 at the spectacular University of Cape Town, and there will be ample opportunities for sight-seeing.

Invited speakers

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 02/16/2017 - 10:07am by Erik Shell.

The Art of Praise: Panegyric and Encomium in Late Antiquity

DEADLINE EXTENDED: MARCH 3

Organizer: Paul Kimball, Bilkent University
Sponsored by the Society for Late Antiquity

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 02/16/2017 - 10:04am by Erik Shell.

Forthcoming in TAPA 147.1 (Spring 2017)

P. J. Finglass, “Euripides’ Oedipus: A Response to Liapis”
This article examines the hypothesis, recently advanced by Vayos Liapis in this journal (TAPA 144: 307-70), that most of the quotation fragments of Euripides’ Oedipus belong not to that play but to a much later rhetorical exercise. It argues that the overwhelming majority of the faults alleged by Liapis are fully compatible with Euripidean language and style; and that even if the authenticity of one or two fragments can be called into question, there is no evidence to support the view that they come from a work written centuries after Euripides’ death.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 02/16/2017 - 9:54am by Erik Shell.

Byzantine Studies Symposium: "Rethinking Empire"
April 21–22, 2017

Dumbarton Oaks
The Music Room
1703 32nd Street NW
Washington, D.C. 20007

Dimiter Angelov and Paul Magdalino, Symposiarchs

What do we mean when we call Byzantium an empire? A flurry of studies in recent years by historians of other hegemonic civilizations have situated empire and imperialism as historical phenomena across different periods and geographical areas. Until now, the involvement of Byzantinists in this reevaluation has been relatively marginal.

This symposium frames the issue of Byzantium’s imperial identity by setting it within wider contexts in the light of new research by Byzantinists as well as the approaches and methods profitably used by historians of other premodern and modern empires. The speakers will tackle fundamental problems of definition and will question Byzantium’s culture and institutions of empire, relations between core and periphery, territoriality, and ethnic diversity.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Tue, 02/14/2017 - 8:30am by Erik Shell.

CALL FOR PAPERS
FIRST CIRCULAR
XXVIth International Conference of 2017

The  XXVIth International Conference and the VIIIth International Bilingual Summer Seminar on XENOPHON, organized by the OLYMPIC CENTER FOR PHILOSOPHY AND CULTURE (OCPC) , will take place in Ancient Olympia and Neochorion -Zacharo, Greece, July 28-31 , 2017 .

The topics of the Conference (A) and  the Seminar (B)  are:

A. PHILOSOPHY AND THE ARTS WITH AN EMPHASIS

(1) ON A HOLISTIC APPROACH

AND

(2) ON THE CONTRIBUTION OF N. KAZANTZAKIS AND J.P. ANTON TO PHILOSOPHY AND THE ARTS

B. XENOPHON’S VIEWS ON PHILOSOPHY, THE ARTS AND HOLISM

Ι. The Conference will explore  a variety of views on:
     
• Philosophy and The Arts:  Comparative, Evaluative and Holistic Approach
• N. Kazantzakis’s Contribution to Philosophy and the Arts
• J. P. Anton’s Contribution to Philosophy and the Arts

DEADLINES:

April 15, 2017:  Abstract is due (300-500 words)

May 31, 2017: Full Paper is due (2.500 words)

*** In case the abstracts or papers are not acceptable the authors will be promptly informed.

---

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 02/13/2017 - 12:45pm by Erik Shell.

Triclinium, Excavated in the House of Actaeon, Pompeii

The Pompeii Bibliography and Mapping Project, directed by Eric Poehler, sets itself lofty goals. PBMP seeks to compile a comprehensive online bibliography and full-text archive of scholarly research on Pompeii, to construct a data-rich, interactive map of the ancient city, and to integrate both into a genre-bending “carto-bibliography” linking scholarly resources with the physical spaces they study. By its own admission (in a 2016 NEH White Paper), PBMP has not yet fully achieved these goals with the project’s first products, a Zotero bibliography and web-map published in late 2014. Some of the stumbling blocks this project faces (such as the scale of its data, legal obstacles, and the inflexibility of available software) will be all too familiar to practitioners of the digital humanities. Yet despite their flaws, these first fruits of the labors of Poehler, et al., provide a valuable digital research tool for students and scholars of ancient Pompeii, and promise to form the basis for improved future iterations.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 02/13/2017 - 12:00am by Gabriel Moss.

We'd like you to keep in mind upcoming deadlines for a number of different fellowships, awards, and abstracts for the 2018 annual meeting:

Abstracts:

  • Abstracts Submission for Affiliated Group Panels for the Annual Meeting: Varied, but mostly around March 1st.  Submit to email address included in call for abstracts.
  • Abstract Submission for Organizer-Refereed Panels for the Annual Meeting: February 24.  Submit to email address included in call for abstracts.

Awards:

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Fri, 02/10/2017 - 2:07pm by Erik Shell.

All Classics Departments, including those outside North America, are eligible for Departmental Membership in the SCS.

International departmental members enjoy the same benefits offered to North American Departmental members including select publications, individual SCS memberships for some students, student award certificates and GreekKeys 2015.

Interested departments should visit our webpage on Departmental Membership, and download the requisite form here.

If you have questions about international departmental membership, please contact the Executive Director at helen.cullyer@nyu.edu

---

(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Fri, 02/10/2017 - 1:55pm by Erik Shell.

Pages

Share This Page

© 2017, Society for Classical Studies Privacy Policy