Call for Director: Vergilian Society Italy Symposium

Extended deadline for Vergilian Society proposals to direct a Symposium in Italy in June 2019 

The Vergilian Society has extended the deadline for proposals to direct the twenty-fifth annual Symposium Cumanum, to take place at the Harry Wilkes Study Center at the Villa Vergiliana in Cuma in about the third week of June, 2019.  We will consider a proposal on any theme pertaining to Vergil and his times, although preference may be given to a subject that has not been treated recently.  Descriptions of previous symposia can be found on the Vergilian Society website, at http://www.vergiliansociety.org/symposium_cumanum/

Each proposal should be prepared by the person who is intending to direct the symposium, or by the lead person if co-directors are envisioned.  The successful director will have logistical assistance from the Vergilian Society’s Italian staff and from the executive committee; a set of guidelines is available to assist in planning.

Proposals should be 250-300 words in length, giving a brief rationale for the theme, some thoughts on what kinds of subjects are likely to be treated, and the names of several scholars who have worked on this theme and might be approached to participate.  As international meetings, our symposia attract participants from all over the world, but since the Vergilian Society is an Italian-American cultural association, we are especially interested in seeing solid participation from scholars in these two countries.

Proposals should be submitted electronically by the new deadline of Wednesday February 28, 2018 to the president of the Vergilian Society, Jim O'Hara, at jimohara@unc.edu.  Informal enquiries are also welcome at that email address.

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(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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Last week the SCS blog reflected on what really does seem to be a golden age of Classics podcasting, where audio content that you can listen to on a portable device whenever convenient has made it easier than ever to teach people about ancient history, to help teachers develop the active use of ancient languages, and to share cutting edge research and scholarly perspectives on the material we study.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 12/31/2018 - 6:07am by Curtis Dozier.

By Erin Averett, Sarah E. Bond, Derek Counts, and Bethany Wasik
 

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 12/28/2018 - 6:26am by Erin Averett.

By Curtis Dozier and Christopher B. Polt

In order to prepare for the SCS’s upcoming sesquicentennial at the annual meeting in San Diego from January 3–6, 2019, the SCS blog is highlighting panels, keynotes, and workshops from the schedule. This week we are focusing on the Podcasting the Classics panel (8:00am–10:30am on Saturday, Jan. 5) by pointing to some resources for those who want to explore the medium more fully.

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 12/27/2018 - 5:48am by Curtis Dozier.
150th Logo

Mary Beard

What is Classics?

Saturday, January 5, 6:15-7:30pm

San Diego Marriott Marquis at the Marina

Marriott Grand Ballroom 9

This lecture is free and open to the public.

What do we mean by Classics now? Why should we study the ancient Greeks and Romans (and other ancient cultures)? How do we think through its apparently reactionary heritage?

This lecture goes back through the 150 year history of the SCS in an attempt to give an optimistic view of the future of the past.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 12/26/2018 - 8:11pm by Helen Cullyer.

In order to prepare for the SCS’s upcoming sesquicentennial at the annual meeting in San Diego from January 3–6, 2019, the SCS blog is highlighting panels, keynotes, and workshops from the schedule. This week we are focusing on the Podcasting the Classics panel (8:00am–10:30am on Saturday, Jan. 5) by pointing to some resources for those who want to explore the medium more fully.

Today we feature a set of podcasts in which the host(s) interview guest classicists to discuss their work, their insights into the ancient world and its relevance for modernity, and their personal and professional experiences.

Ancient Greece Declassified (w/ Vanya Visnjic)

http://www.greecepodcast.com

Explicitly aiming to demystify and to share scholarship on ancient Greece with the non-specialist public, this podcast explores Greek literature, history, philosophy and connects them to modern issues and interests (e.g., the possible causes of the Bronze Age collapse, how Athens dealt with demagogues, what makes Homer’s Odyssey great story-telling).

Classics Confidential (w/ The Open University’s Department of Classical Studies)

https://classicsconfidential.co.uk

View full article. | Posted in on Wed, 12/26/2018 - 5:54am by Christopher Polt.

In order to prepare for the SCS’s upcoming sesquicentennial at the annual meeting in San Diego from January 3–6, 2019, the SCS blog is highlighting panels, keynotes, and workshops from the schedule. This week we are focusing on the Podcasting the Classics panel (8:00am–10:30am on Saturday, Jan. 5) by pointing to some resources for those who want to explore the medium more fully. 

Today we feature a set of podcasts in which the host(s) present material about the ancient world directly to audiences, focusing variously on history, biography, culture, literature, archaeology, and reception. We’ve tried to select series that represent the enormous chronological, topical, and tonal variety that can be found in classics podcasts today (but there are so many available options that we simple couldn’t list everything here, so apologies to all the excellent podcasters we didn’t get to include!).

History of Egypt (w/ Dominic Perry)

https://egyptianhistorypodcast.com

View full article. | Posted in on Tue, 12/25/2018 - 9:19am by Christopher Polt.

In order to prepare for the SCS’s upcoming sesquicentennial at the annual meeting in San Diego from January 3–6, 2019, the SCS blog is highlighting panels, keynotes, and workshops from the schedule. This week we are focusing on the Podcasting the Classics panel (8:00am–10:30am on Saturday, Jan. 5) by pointing to some resources for those who want to explore the medium more fully.

In Epistles 2.1, Horace argues that poets are useful to the city because they can teach the young how to speak, turn people’s ears from crude discourse, and mold the hearts of others with kindly teachings. And what fuels their work? Why, “they live on pods” (vivit siliquis, 2.1.123)!

Horace is thinking legumes, but the same could easily be said of a different kind of pod—the podcast, or siliquasparsio, si licet Latine—which in recent years has helped to cultivate new audiences for classical studies and to find new avenues through which to share knowledge about the classical world. There’s now a podcast for almost every taste: the general public eager to fill their commute and feed their fascination with antiquity; teachers looking for alternative ways to engage with their students; professional classicists seeking metascholarly insights; and so on.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 12/24/2018 - 6:09am by Christopher Polt.
San Diego Reflecting Pond

Luis Alfaro

From the Ancient to the Streets of L.A.: Imagining the Greek Classics for Communities Today

Thursday, January 3, 8:15-9:30PM

San Diego Marriott Marquis at the Marina

Marriott Grand Ballroom 9

Hosted by the SCS and co-organized by Classics and Social Justice and the Onassis Foundation USA


In his lecture, playwright Luis Alfaro, author of Mojada and Oedipus El Rey, guides us on a journey from Athens to East L.A. as we connect the ancient myths and bring them alive for contemporary audiences today. Socrates reminds us that storytelling changes and grows, but do stories ever lose their meaning and power? Come discover the journey that makes these classics still essential today.

Luis Alfaro works in theater, performance, poetry and is an associate professor at the University of Southern California. A Chicano born and raised in the Pico-Union district of downtown Los Angeles, Alfaro is the recipient of a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation fellowship, popularly known as a “genius grant”, awarded to people who have demonstrated expertise and exceptional creativity in their respective fields. He is the first Playwright-in-Residence in the 84-year history of the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, the largest repertory theatre company in the United States, serving for six seasons (2013-2019).

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 12/20/2018 - 10:14pm by Helen Cullyer.

As the field of Classical Studies has sought to maintain its relevance in our ever-changing modern world, it has begun to incorporate new approaches. Today there is much more scholarship on topics such as gender, sexuality, and race in the ancient world, for example, than there was even thirty years ago. Much of this change has resulted from the incorporation of theoretical frameworks from fields outside of classical studies, including literary criticism, gender and sexuality studies, and social theory. Yet there is still so much work to be done, especially when it comes to understanding marginal groups in antiquity, such as women, ethnic minorities, and sexual minorities.

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View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 12/20/2018 - 9:22pm by Andrea F. Gatzke.
Map of Atlantis by Athanasius Kircher, Mundus subterraneus, vol. 1. (Amsterdam 1678) (Image in the Public Domain via Wikimedia).

A recent surge of critical focus on pseudoscience and classics focused on issues from Hippocrates and scientific racism to the racial bias of Ancient Aliens sees scholars doing the work to convince our field that classicists, historians, and archaeologists ought to take action to address the dissemination of pseudoscientific views in popular media.[1] Yet once we’ve accepted that we should confront pseudoscience in classics and archaeology, we find ourselves confronted with a rather different question: how can we best teach this in our classrooms?

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View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 12/13/2018 - 5:09pm by Ana Maria Guay.

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