Call for Director: Vergilian Society Italy Symposium

Extended deadline for Vergilian Society proposals to direct a Symposium in Italy in June 2019 

The Vergilian Society has extended the deadline for proposals to direct the twenty-fifth annual Symposium Cumanum, to take place at the Harry Wilkes Study Center at the Villa Vergiliana in Cuma in about the third week of June, 2019.  We will consider a proposal on any theme pertaining to Vergil and his times, although preference may be given to a subject that has not been treated recently.  Descriptions of previous symposia can be found on the Vergilian Society website, at http://www.vergiliansociety.org/symposium_cumanum/

Each proposal should be prepared by the person who is intending to direct the symposium, or by the lead person if co-directors are envisioned.  The successful director will have logistical assistance from the Vergilian Society’s Italian staff and from the executive committee; a set of guidelines is available to assist in planning.

Proposals should be 250-300 words in length, giving a brief rationale for the theme, some thoughts on what kinds of subjects are likely to be treated, and the names of several scholars who have worked on this theme and might be approached to participate.  As international meetings, our symposia attract participants from all over the world, but since the Vergilian Society is an Italian-American cultural association, we are especially interested in seeing solid participation from scholars in these two countries.

Proposals should be submitted electronically by the new deadline of Wednesday February 28, 2018 to the president of the Vergilian Society, Jim O'Hara, at jimohara@unc.edu.  Informal enquiries are also welcome at that email address.

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(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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Fifteen distinguished classical scholars (full list below) will be coming together to present papers at the Biggs Family Residency Reunion, a celebration of the annual week-long Residency in Classics at Washington University that began in 1990 and will be taking place at Washington University in St. Louis from April 11-13, 2018.

Details of the program, the Residency, travel and more are available here: 

https://sites.wustl.edu/biggsreunion18/  

Please feel free to send inquiries or interest to classics@wustl.edu or to the organizers (listed below).

Organizers

Tim Moore (tmoore26@wustl.edu) and Cathy Keane (ckeane@wustl.edu), Washington University Department of Classics

Henry Biggs (hbiggs@wustl.edu), Evalx.com fan and a Biggs

Scholars speaking at the Biggs Family Residency Reunion:

Mary T. Boatwright

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 01/29/2018 - 10:42am by Erik Shell.

Deadlines for Affiliated Group (AFG) Panels and Organizer Refereed Panels (ORP) at the 2019 Annual Meeting are fast approaching.

You can find the AFG CFPs and the ORP CFPs either at the links provided or on the 2019 Annual Meeting Page.

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(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 01/29/2018 - 10:35am by Erik Shell.

Below is the list of eleven proposed panels for the 16th annual ISNS conference, to be held in Los Angeles on June 13-16, 2018, in conjunction with Loyola Marymount University.

  • If you wish to submit a one-page abstract for a panel, please send it to the panel organizer(s) for that specific panel. 
  • If you wish to submit an abstract for the conference that does not fit well into any of the proposed panels, please send that abstract to the four conference organizers:

          Eric Perl <Eric.Perl@lmu.edu>

          David Albertson <dalberts@usc.edu>

          Marilynn Lawrence <pronoia12@gmail.com>

          John Finamore <john-finamore@uiowa.edu>

All abstracts (whether for specific panels or not) are due by February 26, 2018.

Papers may be presented in English, Portuguese, French, German, Spanish, or Italian.  It is recommended that those delivering papers in languages other than English provide printed copies to their audience at the conference.

Please note that anyone giving a paper at the conference must be a member of the ISNS. You may sign up and pay dues on the web site of the Philosophy Documentation Center: 

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 01/29/2018 - 9:58am by Erik Shell.

The SCS is requesting comment from its members on the proposed Statement on Research and Cultural Property.

The initial statement, along with links to supporting materials and how to comment, can be found here: Research and Cultural Property Statement

This comment period will end on March 15th.

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 01/29/2018 - 9:35am by Erik Shell.

Winckelmann’s Victims. The Classics: Norms, Exclusions and Prejudices

Ghent University (Belgium), 20-22 September 2018

CONFIRMED KEYNOTE SPEAKERS: Michelle Warren (University of Dartmouth) – Mark Vessey (University of British Columbia) – Irene Zwiep (University of Amsterdam)

“Der einzige Weg für uns, groß, ja, wenn
 es möglich ist, unnachahmlich zu werden, is
die Nachahmung der Alten.”
Johannes Winckelmann

Classics played a major and fundamental role in the cultural history of Western Europe. Few would call this into question. Since the Carolingian period, notably ‘classical’ literature has served as a constant source and model of creativity and inspiration, by which the literary identity of Europe has been negotiated and (re-)defined. The tendency to return to the classics and resuscitate them remains sensible until today, as classical themes and stories are central to multiple contemporary literary works, both in ‘popular’ and ‘high’ culture. Think for instance of Rick Riordan’s fantastic tales about Percy Jackson or Colm Tóibín’s refined novels retelling the Oresteia.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 01/25/2018 - 9:41am by Erik Shell.
"Joe Farrell," Ann de Forest, unpublished

A Day in the Life of a Classicist is a monthly column on the SCS blog written by Prof. Ayelet Haimson Lushkov celebrating the working lives of classicists. If you’d like to share your day, let us know here.

Joe Farrell is the president of the SCS, and Professor of Classical Studies at Penn.

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 01/25/2018 - 12:00am by Ayelet Haimson Lushkov.
Epigraphy

Latin Epigraphy Program in Rome in Summer 2018

The American Academy in Rome is pleased to offer in June 2018 an intensive introduction to the study of Latin and Greek inscriptions in the city of Rome.

AAR Summer Program in Roman Epigraphy, June 18 – June 29, 2018

Application Deadline: 31 January 2018

Instructor: John Bodel, Brown University

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Tue, 01/23/2018 - 7:52am by Erik Shell.

(Submitted by Paula Debnar, Professor of Classics, Department of Classics and Italian, Mount Holyoke College)

M. Philippa (Forder) Goold, longtime professor of classics and department head at Mount Holyoke, died on March 29, 2017, after a short illness. She was 84.

Philippa was born in Salisbury, Southern Rhodesia (now Harare, Zimbabwe) in 1932. After taking degrees at both the University of Cape Town and Cambridge University—where her housemates at Newnham’s Whitstead Cottage included Sylvia Path—she returned to Salisbury in 1956 to begin teaching at the University College of Rhodesia and Nyasaland (now the University of Zimbabwe). In 1967 she came to the U.S. to join the faculty at Mount Holyoke, but left in 1973 when her husband, George P. Goold, was named Professor of Latin at University College London. When George accepted a professorship at Yale in 1977, Philippa returned to Mount Holyoke, where she continued to teach, eventually holding the chair of Professor of Classics on the Alumnae Foundation, and lead the department until her retirement in 1996.

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Tue, 01/23/2018 - 7:39am by Erik Shell.

NEW PERSPECTIVES ON CICERO’S PHILOSOPHY

February 10-11, 2018

The ethical and political issues treated in Cicero's major philosophical writings have been a topic of lively interest in modern scholarship. With funding from the Matariki Network, from the University of Durham, and from Dartmouth College, this conference brings together an international group of scholars who are actively working on Cicero's ethical and political thought.

Jed Atkins    

Cicero on the Justice of War 

Nathan Gilbert

Cicero against Lucretius De morte

Margaret Graver

The psychology of honor in Cicero’s De Re Publica

Sean McConnell

Old Men in Cicero’s Political Philosophy

Geert Roskam

Nos in diem vivimus: Cicero’s approach in the Tusculan disputations

Malcolm Schofield

Iuris consensu revisited

Katharina Volk

Towards a Definition of Sapientia: Philosophy in Cicero's Pro Marcello

Georgina White

Skepticism and Fiction in the Academica

Raphael Woolf

Cicero on Rhetoric and Dialectic

James Zetzel

Cicero's Platonic Dialogues

For information on the venue please contact nathan.b.gilbert@durham.ac.uk.

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View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 01/22/2018 - 1:03pm by Erik Shell.

(Written by Sarah E. Cox, and shared with the SCS by Ofelia N. Salgado-Buttrey)

Theodore V. Buttrey, Jr.

29 December 1929 – 9 January 2018

Renowned educator, numismatist and classicist, Theodore V. (“Ted”) Buttrey, Jr., died on January 9, 2018, eleven days after his 88th birthday.  Born in Havre, Montana, as a child he attended the Peacock Military Academy in San Antonio, Texas, where he first encountered the coins of Mexico, a life-long interest.  His secondary education was at the Phillips Exeter Academy in New Hampshire, after which he entered Princeton University, graduating magna cum laude in 1950 in Classics.  In the summer of 1952, he participated in the inaugural Summer Seminar in Numismatics conducted by the American Numismatic Society, an experience that may well have been pivotal in setting the later course of his career.  In 1953, still at Princeton, he completed his Ph.D. thesis on a numismatic subject, “Studies in the Coinage of Marc Anthony,” a chapter of which was condensed and published as “Thea Neotera on Coins of Antony and Cleopatra,” ANS Museum Notes 6 (1954), pp. 95-109.  There followed a Fulbright scholarship to study in Rome.

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Fri, 01/19/2018 - 2:06pm by Erik Shell.

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