Call for Fellows: Data Visualizations Using the D'Argenio Collection

Call for Fellows: Data Visualizations Using the D’Argenio Collection

Seton Hall University – University Libraries (Fall 2021)
Application Deadline: July 15, 2021
Fellowship Period: Fall 2021

Background

Seton Hall University Libraries support excellence in academic and individual work, enable inquiry, foster intellectual and ethical integrity and respect for diverse points of view through user-focused services and robust collections as the intellectual and cultural heart of the University.  Walsh Gallery, based in the Library, manages the University’s museum collections, and the Library’s Data Services division assists the University community in managing and presenting their data.

One of Seton Hall University’s most distinguished collections, the D’Argenio Collection of Coins and Antiquities, includes coins of ancient Greece, the Roman Republic, the Roman Empire and Byzantium as well as a small collection of related Byzantine and Etruscan artifacts: oil lamps, game pieces, weights and terra cotta figurines. Donor Ron D’Argenio became interested in ancient coins when taking courses in Greek drama and history as an undergraduate at Fordham University in the 1970’s. In 2001, he generously donated his collection to Seton Hall University in memory of his father, Rinaldo J. D’Argenio, who served in World War II and was awarded a Bronze Star for his valor. Ron D’Argenio is a practicing attorney working in Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey. The collection is available for study and research by students and scholars.

Data Services offers consultations to SHU community members assisting them with every stage of a data project from conceptualization, to choosing tools, to data analysis, to sharing results.  Find more on the tools supported here: https://library.shu.edu/data-services.

Request for Proposals

The University Libraries seeks fellowship proposals using the Ron D’Argenio Collection as the basis for projects in the following two areas:

  • Classics, Art History or History : a scholar from one of these fields, a related field or interdisciplinary scholar who would be able to analyze the collection in its historical context and add to our knowledge of the objects.
  • Data Visualization: a specialist in data visualization, who would be able to create – in conversation with the humanities scholar (above) – an interactive visual representation of the collection that would allow users to explore the objects by interpreting and presenting the data in a number of ways (see all the coins within a certain date range, or all coins from a particular region, for example).

Specialists who have at minimum completed all coursework for the the terminal degree in their area are invited to propose research projects that fall under one or both of the above areas. Preference will go to the strongest applications that are both feasible for this collection and our technology infrastructure. All projects should incorporate the Ron D’Argenio Collection of Coins and Antiquities.  The final product for the Classics/Art History/History scholar would take the form of a short (5-7 page) written report interpreting the collection which would additionally be shared with the University community as an article or lecture.  The Data Visualization scholar would be responsible for producing a data visualization project which would be publicly presented on the University Libraries website and the process of creation described in an article or lecture.  Beyond the duration of the fellowship, the work of both fellows will inform future initiatives with the collection.

You can view a small portion of the Ron D’Argenio Collection of Coins and Antiquities on our Google Arts and Culture page or you may make a research appointment to gather additional data and/or view the collection by contacting us at walshgallery@shu.edu or 973-275-2033.

Terms/Eligibility for Fellowships

Scholars who at minimum have completed all coursework for the terminal degree in their field may apply.  Work can be performed remotely for the most part.  Access to the collections on site is conducted in a socially distanced environment compliant with all recommendations aimed at stopping the spread of COVID-19.  The University Libraries will provide each fellow with access to its library databases and resources, accounts in and support for the data software available, an email address and access to Microsoft Teams software for collaboration and Sharepoint for storage space.  Fellows will be expected to give a presentation or write an article on their project to share with the University community by the fall of 2022.

Fellows will be paid a stipend of $2,500 for projects that focus on one of the two areas. Half will be paid on award, half on project completion.  Applicants may propose a project that incorporates both Classical scholarship and data visualization for a combined $5000 to be disbursed in the same way.

Procedures

Submit a single pdf including the following components as an email attachment to library@shu.edu :

  • an application cover sheet (which includes your name, project title, contact information and a short bio.
  • a two-page statement (roughly 500 words), describing your research project and its relation to the Ron D’Argenio Collection of Coins and Antiquities, in which you explain how it fits into your past research (if applicable) and future plans.
  • a curriculum vitae
  • a recent example of scholarship

Notifications

Submissions must be received by July 15, 2021. Applicants will be notified by September 1, 2021. Research should take place in the fall of 2021, and the project results (written work or data visualization) completed by May 31, 2022. The lecture or article on the project should take place in the spring or fall of 2022. Please contact Sarah Ponichtera, Assistant Dean of Special Collections and the Gallery at sarah.ponichtera@shu .edu with any questions.

Categories

Follow SCS News for information about the SCS and all things classical.

Use this field to search SCS News
Select a category from this list to limit the content on this page.

Valerie French, Associate Professor Emerita of History in American University, Washington, D.C., died suddenly in her home in Washington, Dec. 8, 2011, in her 71st year. She was born in Toledo, Ohio, Jan. 16, 1941. She received her B.A. degree in chemistry from Cornell University, where her interest in ancient history was awakened in classes under Donald Kagan. She pursued ancient history at UCLA, where she gained her M.A. and Ph. D. (1971) degrees, learning her needed languages in graduate school. She taught at American University from 1969 until her retirement in 2005. She received multiple awards for teaching and for her work in administration. Ebullient and supportive towards all, she served several years as a dean. She published widely on the history and activities of women and children in antiquity and sustained by herself the program in ancient history at American University. Other colleagues will discuss her work in these areas. This notice will focus on her strictly scientific work. It has remained little known but is of the highest importance for Greek, especially Athenian, history.

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Sun, 01/29/2012 - 10:01pm by Adam Blistein.

James H. Tatum, Dartmouth College, has won the American Book Award for 2011 for his book African American Writers and Classical Tradition, Chicago, 2010, co-authored with William Cook.  The American Book Awards, established in 1978 by the Before Columbus Foundation, recognize outstanding literary achievement from the entire spectrum of America's diverse literary community.

View full article. | Posted in Member News on Sun, 01/29/2012 - 9:09pm by Adam Blistein.

Each year the National Committee for Latin and Greek (NCLG) sponsors National Latin Teacher Recruitment Week (NLTRW), which takes place during the week of March 5th this year.  The APA has joined the American Classical League and numerous regional and state organizations in this effort to encourage all Classicists at all levels of instruction to take steps that will ensure that Latin, Greek, and Classics pre-college classrooms have the teachers they need.  Thanks to the considerable public interest in Latin and the classical world, demand for Latin teachers at the primary and secondary levels has outrun supply, and there is now a serious shortage in many regions of the USA and Canada.  Each year, for lack of teachers, existing programs are cancelled, thriving programs are told they cannot expand, and schools that want to add Latin are unable to do so. 

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 01/25/2012 - 9:17pm by Adam Blistein.

From The Chronicle Review:

Erasmus quoted the Iliad in a time of widening war:

Men get their fill of sleep and love, of beautiful singing and carefree dance, but they never get enough of war.

And they never get enough of the Iliad. In his anthology, Homer in English, George Steiner asked in 1996, Why are there so many Iliads in English? His answer: notions of noble manliness. "There shines throughout the Iliad an idealized yet also unflinching vision of masculinity, of an order of values and mutual recognitions radically virile."

Small wonder the epic has appealed to warrior nations like England and the United States. William Blake warned, "It is the Classics & not Goths nor Monks, that Desolate Europe with Wars.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Wed, 01/25/2012 - 2:26pm by Information Architect.

Instructions for submission of proposals to the APA Program Committee for review at its meeting in April will be posted here at the beginning of February.  The deadline for receipt of these submissions will be no earlier than March 16, 2012.  Until these instructions are posted, consult the information provided last year, especially the program policies, the descriptions of materials required for the different types of submissions, and the information on eligibility.  (Note:  Persons submitting proposals to the Program Committee this year must be members in good standing for 2012.)  While the method of submission may be different this year, general policies and the materials required will be very similar and probably identical. 

At its April meeting the Program Committee will consider the following types of submissions

Proposals of Sessions for the 2013 Annual Meeting

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 01/24/2012 - 3:00pm by Adam Blistein.

The message below was sent to all APA members for whom we have a valid e-mail address on January 20, 2012.

---------------------

Dear Colleague:

Our joint annual meeting just completed in Philadelphia attracted over 3,000 registrants—one of our largest meetings ever.  Daniel Mendelsohn got us off to a wonderful start by movingly reminding us why we devote our lives to the study of classical antiquity.  Kathleen Coleman’s Presidential Panel entitled “Images for Classicists” showed us new ways to carry out our work, and new initiatives from the Program Committee improved both the presentations at sessions and the discussions they stimulated.  And to judge from the number of institutions conducting interviews through the Placement Service, even the job market (knock on wood) was improved over the last two years.  All these efforts produced an energy that carried over to the book display, the CAMP performance, and, of course, the receptions.  I look forward to working with you to maintain that energy during my Presidency.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Sat, 01/21/2012 - 6:47pm by Adam Blistein.

Search for Editor of Transactions of the American Philological Association

Professor Katharina Volk has indicated her intention to complete her term as Editor at the 2014 Annual Meeting.  The Editor, who must be a member in good standing of the Association, is initially appointed for four years, with the possibility of extension for a maximum of two additional years.   The new editor's term officially begins in January 2014 and will cover volumes 144-147 and the years 2014-2017.  As Editor Designate, however, the new editor will begin to receive submissions in early 2013 and spend the summer and fall of that year preparing the 2014 issues for the press.  Professor Volk will complete the two issues for the year 2013.

The editor of TAPA has sole responsibility for editorial content, and must acknowledge submissions, select referees, and inform authors whether submissions have been accepted.  In addition, the editor must work closely with the journals division of Johns Hopkins University Press, which typesets, produces and distributes each issue.  A lively interest in the future of scholarly publishing in the digital age will be a welcome qualification.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Sat, 01/21/2012 - 6:31pm by Adam Blistein.

"Latin is a bit like a zombie: dead but still clamoring to get into our brains. In one discipline, however, Latin just got a bit deader. For at least 400 years, botanists across the globe have relied on Latin as their lingua franca, but the ardor has cooled. Scientists say plants will keep their double-barreled Latin names, but they have decided to drop the requirement that new species be described in the classical language. Instead, they have agreed to allow botanists to use English (other languages need not apply). In their scientific papers, they can still describe a newly found species of plant — or algae or fungi — in Latin if they wish, but most probably won’t."

Read more online at The Washington Post.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Sat, 01/21/2012 - 6:23pm by Information Architect.

"A university professorship which has been dormant for more than a decade is to be revived after a £2.4m bequest from the last person to hold the post. Professor Douglas Maurice MacDowell held Glasgow University's Chair of Greek between 1971 and 2001. After his death in 2010, aged 78, Prof MacDowell's will stated his portfolio of stocks and shares be used to re-establish the position. The new Chair of Greek is expected to be in place for September this year." Read more at the BBC online.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Thu, 01/19/2012 - 9:54pm by Information Architect.

From the Truman State University Index:

"Despite its small numbers, the classics department remains alive even though their languages are ancient. There are 19 declared classics majors, five of whom will graduate this year, 27 minors and four full-time staff members, said Clifton Kreps, classical and modern language department chair. The Missouri Department of Higher Education reviewed all programs with fewer than 10 graduates a year during Fall 2010. Truman State thus was required to provide a written justification and answer a questionnaire regarding enrollment data for the small number of graduates in classics, along with art history, Russian, German, interdisciplinary studies and bachelors of music. The explanation satisfied the MDHE for the time being, but another review is scheduled for 2014. No further information regarding the format or consequences of the next review has been provided to the University."

Read more here.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Mon, 01/16/2012 - 2:48am by Information Architect.

Pages

© 2020, Society for Classical Studies Privacy Policy