Call for Papers: Association of Ancient Historians Annual Meeting

Association of Ancient Historians Annual Meeting

College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia, April 19-21, 2018.

Call for Papers

We seek papers that raise broader issues and themes that will engage all AAH attendees regardless of their primary specialization. As always with the AAH, all sessions are plenary.   Papers will be 20 minutes in length, with time for discussion.

Please send abstracts (.pdf or .docx) of no more than 500 words to aahmeeting2018@gmail.com by Monday, December 4, 2017. Limited references may be provided in-text only; no bibliographies please. Name your submission file in a way that indicates the panel to which you are applying.

We anticipate holding sessions on the following themes:

  • Travel in Ancient History

Recent decades have seen a growth of interest in the study of travel in antiquity, a topic that is integral to geography and cartography and was itself an important strand in many literary genres. This panel will attempt to draw together the threads of this trend by examining the phenomenon of travel in antiquity from as broad a range of perspectives as possible. Some of the topics that papers might address are the logistics of ancient travel, cartographical tools that helped guide travel, the role of travel in historical and biographical events, the role of travel in interstate politics and economy, travel as a means of acquiring social capital and defining identities, ideologies of travel and their relation to reality, travel and pilgrimage in the practice of ancient religions, the historiography of travel, and travel as an element of historiographical methodology.  

  • Colonialism and Ancient Mediterranean Religions

Historical and cultural studies over the last few decades have embraced the study of colonialism in the ancient world.  Theoretical approaches to this concept have included colonial and post-colonial theory, empire theory, as well as ethnicity and other types of identity studies.  The impact of colonialism on religious practices of the ancient Mediterranean world, however, has not yet been thoroughly explored.  Questions to be considered in this panel may include the following.  How are the religious practices and beliefs of a colonizing state viewed by the indigenous population and vice versa?  To what degree are the religious practices of the colonizing state affected by indigenous practices? How do the religious practices of a colony relate to those of its “mother” state?  Is there evidence for “resistance” to colonialism in religious practice?  This panel aims to bring together scholars of religion, history, philology, and archaeology to explore case studies and theoretical models for understanding the impact of colonialism on ancient Mediterranean religions.

  • Ancient Democracy

We seek papers that explore all aspects of ancient democracy.  Topics might include (but are not limited to) the use of non-literary sources, such as epigraphy and papyri, to understand ancient political systems, the evolution of democracy in the Hellenistic and Roman periods, or the intersection of democracy and economics.  Papers that focus on areas and time periods beyond the scope of Classical Athenian democracy are especially welcome.

  • Food, Drink and Identity

In recent years scholarly contributions in the area of ancient food culture have begun to provide fresh perspectives on social, political, military and religious identity in the Greco-Roman world. We seek papers that will continue to build upon these recent advances by viewing ancient food, drink and identity through a wide interpretative lens, from the Greek Bronze Age to the Late Roman Empire, including the ancient Near East. Comparative approaches with other cultures and time periods will be especially welcome, as will be papers that treat the topic through any number of sources, including, but not limited to, historiographical, inscriptional, legal and archaeological.

  • New Directions in Achaemenid Persian Studies

The study of the Achaemenid Persian empire has grown into a thriving field of ancient history, with fruitful connections to related disciplines including Assyriology, Egyptology, Judaica, and Greek history.  This panel seeks to stimulate conversations on the future of Achaemenid Studies, and welcomes papers on new evidence, approaches, and projects of importance to the field.  Topics may include (but are not limited to) the evidence of the Persepolis archives, Babylonian temple archives, the archaeology and art history of the Achaemenid empire, and the textual evidence for Persia’s relations with Mediterranean neighbors.

  • Imperial Encounters in Ancient Anatolia

Ancient Anatolia was a meeting place of empires, the site of complex encounters between the political, cultural, religious, and economic systems of foreign conquest-states and diverse local populations.  This panel will explore the interactions between imperial powers and the people and landscapes of Anatolia in the longue durée, and welcomes papers on aspects of this theme from the Hittite Bronze Age to the Persian, Hellenistic, and Roman eras.

  • Archaeology and Epigraphy
Recent years have witnessed a sea-change in the way we access and make use of inscriptions from antiquity – from the digitization of material (e.g. The Herculaneum Graffiti Project), to mapping (Imperium Romanum on Googlemaps), to crowd-sourcing that helps produce critical editions (the Ancient Lives project). This panel invites submissions that employ or publicize new approaches to inscriptions, illustrating the benefit of new methodologies and practices. We also invite interdisciplinary papers, especially archaeological inquiries that provide context on the display, meaning, and function of inscriptions as monuments.

Call for Posters

This year’s AAH meeting will also have space and time set aside for posters. Please send abstracts as above. 

For more information email aahmeeting2018@gmail.com or visit
http://associationofancienthistorians.org/2018meeting/call.html

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(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)
 

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Below is the complete programme of the KCL International Postgraduate Workshop "Lyric Beyond Lyric - 'Submerged' Traditions, Generic Interactions, and Later Receptions".

The programme can be found below as well as on our Facebook page (@Lyric-Beyond-Lyric) and on https://independent.academia.edu/LyricBeyondLyric2018 . 

The workshop will take place on 24 May 2018 at the Strand campus, King's College London (room S0.13). Our confirmed keynote speaker will be Prof Pauline LeVen (Yale University).

To attend the workshop, registration via Eventbrite is mandatory for all attendees (excluding confirmed speakers and respondents). The conference is free to attend and lunch and refreshments will be provided. The Eventbrite registration for the event will close at 8 pm on 11 May 2018.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Fri, 04/20/2018 - 8:30am by Erik Shell.

We are saddened to report the passing of Dr. Vincent J. Rosivach, SCS Life Member and very active member of CANE.

"His legacy in the humanities and the College of Arts and Sciences will continue, and students are encouraged to honor his legacy by continuing to foster their education and immerse themselves into the wonders of classical history and literature."

You can read his full obituary on the Fairfield Mirror here: http://fairfieldmirror.com/news/longtime-fairfield-professor-passes-away/

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(Photo: "Candle" by Shawn Carpenter, licensed under CC BY 2.0)   

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Thu, 04/19/2018 - 8:32am by Erik Shell.

A Day in the Life of A Classicist is a monthly column on the SCS blog, celebrating the working lives of classicists.

Nadya Williams is Associate Professor of History at the University of West Georgia.

As an academic who is also a homeschooling mom, crazy is the normal for me.  I am married to another academic, and thus we set our schedule together. To make sure that we have at least some time together as a family, we start the day with a family breakfast around 8 am. By 9 am, the 12-year-old starts his homeschooling day (he has a list of assignments to work through, and I check as needed), and I start the work day. Sometimes the toddler gets out his toy computer, and starts pounding on it in imitation of mama typing. Solidarity!

View full article. | Posted in on Wed, 04/18/2018 - 4:24pm by Ayelet Haimson Lushkov.

The deadline to submit an individual abstract for the 2019 SCS Annual Meeting in San Diego is 11:59p.m. on Wednesday, April 25th

SCS members can submit their abstracts via the Program Submission Site here: https://program.classicalstudies.org/

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 04/17/2018 - 2:52pm by Erik Shell.

Latin Lexicography Summer Workshop: 30 July – 4 August, 2018

Thesaurus linguae Latinae Institute

Bavarian Academy of Sciences and Humanities, Munich

                The Thesaurus linguae Latinae Institute announces its first annual Latin Lexicography Workshop, a one-week event in Munich, July 30 to August 4, 2018. We invite participation by researchers at any stage in their career whose work involves the rigorous evaluation of Latin words in any aspect, ranging from their use in specific texts or their changing significance across the entire corpus of ancient Latin. In addition to philology, relevant disciplines include conceptual and intellectual history, epigraphy, linguistics, literary and textual criticism, medieval and Renaissance studies, philosophy, and theology.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 04/16/2018 - 8:48am by Erik Shell.
Header: Achilles cedes Briseis to Agamemnon, from the House of the Tragic Poet in Pompeii, fresco, 1st century CE (Naples National Archaeological Museum. Image via Wikimedia and is in the Public Domain)

Troy: Fall of a City is a joint effort by Netflix and the BBC to repackage the Trojan War story as the next season of Game of Thrones. Producers David Farr, Derek Wax, and Christopher Aird didn’t have dig too deep to find the material they needed within the ancient myth: blood-thirsty kings, violent battle scenes, forbidden love, and powerful beings flying down from the sky. The Epic Cycle has it all and, since Troy (2004, starring Brad Pitt) hit the theaters nearly 15 years ago, perhaps we were due for another rendering.

Released in the U.S. on April 6th, the 8-episode series is ambitious, to say the least. Its writers wanted to tell the story of the fall of the mythological city of Troy and this, perhaps, is a bit hubristic. After all, Homer’s Iliad (which consists of over 15,000 lines of poetry and would have taken over 15 hours to perform) only covers the “wrath of Achilles,” roughly a 40-day period near the end of the 10-year war. But Troy: Fall of a City has restricted its plot substantially. Rather than including as many heroes and all of the scenes from the Iliad as they could, the writers chose to focus on Paris (aka Alexander, played by Louis Hunter) and Helen (Bella Dayne).

View full article. | Posted in on Sun, 04/15/2018 - 5:22pm by Debra Trusty.
NEH Logo

April, 2018

Below is a list of the most recent NEH grantees and their Classically-themed projects. The NEH helps fund a number of SCS initiatives, and their support affects the field of Classics at a national and local level.

Grantees

  • Jennifer Ferriss-Hill (University of Miami) - "The Ancient Roman Poet Horace's "Art of Poetry" and the Art of Living"
  • Heidi Morse (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor) - "Black Women an the Classical Traditions of Greece and Rome in 19th-Century America"
  • Jenifer Neils (American School of Classical Studies at Athens) - "Long-term Research Fellowships at The American School of Classical Studies at Athens"
  • Dean Smith (Cornell University) - "Humanities Open Book Program - Cornell University III"
  • Peter Meineck (Aquila Theatre Company Inc.) - "Citizen Soldiers: Ancient and Modern Expressions of War"
  • Aaron Johnson (Lee University) - "Philosophy and Tradition in the Contra Julianumby Cyril of Alexandria (c. 375-444)"
  • Jessica Powers (San Antonio Museum of Art) - "Sacred Landscapes: Visions of Nature and Myth in Ancient Rome"
  • Denise McCoskey (Miami University, Oxford) - "Eugenics and Classical Scholarship in Early 20th-Century America"

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View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Fri, 04/13/2018 - 9:25am by Erik Shell.

Seminar on Plato at Syracuse

June 4-5, 2018
Sicily Center for International Education, Siracusa

A seminar on Plato at Syracuse will be held in Siracusa, June 4-5, just before the Fourth Interdisciplinary Symposium on the Heritage of Western Greece.  The goal of this project is to understand Plato’s involvement with Syracuse and Southern Italy in a multidisciplinary way and produce a volume which combines a new translation of the Seventh Letter with original essays from scholars of varying disciplines.

Scholars interested in participating in the seminar should contact Heather Reid, fontearetusa1@gmail.com, no later than May 1, 2018.  If you would like to propose a paper for the volume, you must provide a full-text draft (maximum 5,000 words) in Chicago style, prepared for blind review, before the May 1st deadline so we can include it in the seminar book.  You may contribute a paper without participating in the seminar and you may participate in the seminar without contributing a paper.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Thu, 04/12/2018 - 2:43pm by Erik Shell.

Below are this year's Pedagogy Award winners and their projects.

Michael Okyere Asante (Stellenbosch University and University of Ghana)

  • The award supports travel costs from South Africa to London in order to present at the Classical Association Conference. The research explored two schools in Ghana and their integration of Classics into their curriculum.
Bret Mulligan (Haverford College) and Christopher Francese (Dickinson College)
  • This award supports the work required for the digitization of Index Apuleianus by William Abbott Oldfather. The work will convert it into a fully lemmatized text and database.
T. H. M. Gellar-Goad (Wake Forest University): 
  • With this award Prof. Gellar-Goad will fund approximately 50 students’ travel to perform adaptations of Aristophanes and Plautus for the North Carolina Junior Classical League state convention in April 2019.

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View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 04/12/2018 - 2:26pm by Erik Shell.

A new Classics program has started up at Southern Virginia University. The university now offers a Major and Minor in Classical Studies, with classes in Greek and Latin as well as history, philosophy, and the arts.

Join us in congratulating them and the expansion of our field!

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(Photo: "Main Hall" by Carol M. Highsmith, public domain)

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Thu, 04/12/2018 - 8:56am by Erik Shell.

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Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings
Below is the complete programme of the KCL International Postgraduate Worksho
In Memoriam
We are saddened to report the passing of Dr. Vincent J.
SCS Announcements
The deadline to submit an individual abstract for the 2019 SCS Annual Meeting
Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings
Latin Lexicography Summer Workshop: 30 July – 4 August, 2018

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