Call for Papers: Identity Under Empire

Boston University Graduate Student Conference

Identity Under Empire: Defining the Self under the Cultural Hegemony of the Athenian, Macedonian, and Roman Empires

Date of Conference: March 17, 2018

Keynote Speaker
Steven Smith
Hofstra University

The Department of Classical Studies at Boston University is excited to accept papers for its 10th annual Graduate Studies Conference. This year, the conference will examine the question of regional, national, personal, artistic, religious, and ethnic identity under the Athenian and Roman Empires as well as the empires of Philip II and Alexander the Great, and the subsequent Hellenistic Kingdoms. The cultural and political influence of any ancient empire has a far-reaching effect on the populace not only of founding city-states, but also that of the extending territories within its dominion. This conference intends to explore how ancient peoples – citizens and non-citizens, male and female alike – negotiated the multifarious problem of identity within the complexity of a unified yet multicultural empire. We enthusiastically welcome submissions from any and all fields of the humanities covering material, textual, or other sources.

Possible paper topics might include, but are not limited to:

  • The question of personae in ancient literature under empire
  • Portrayals of racial/ethnic identity by emperors and/or authors
  • Gender identity and gender roles under empires: correspondences/dissonances between literary depictions, societal expectations, and historical realities
  • Examinations of institutionalized constructs of identity (e.g.: Greek citizenship law of 451; the Leges Juliae)
  • The significance of Greek ethnicity during the Peloponnesian war
  • Local religion/cult and its relationship to official, imperial religion
  • Terminology: ways of expressing ethnic/racial identity in the ancient world, and the connotations/implications of these labels (e.g.: Patavinitas)
  • Philosophy and sophistry under empire
  • Examination and analysis of political satire
  • Self-identification of emperors with different gods and the deification of emperors (e.g.: Alexander and Ammon; Augustus and Apollo)
  • Alexander and the Persians
  • The question of “National Texts” vs. “Propaganda” vs. “Veiled Speech” under empire
  • Racial/Ethnic identity of Roman slaves & Freedmen/Freedwomen
  • Near-Eastern influence on literature and art under empire
  • Historiographical representations of “Others”

We encourage those interested in participation to send an abstract of no more than 500 words, along with a bibliography of no more than 150 words, for a 20-minute presentation to Victoria Burmeister, Shannon DuBois, and William Bruckel at IdentityUnderEmpire@Gmail.com on or before January 14th, 2018. We request that all documents be submitted as PDFs.

Please direct any questions or concerns to us at the address listed above. Submission decisions will be announced in early February.

Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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Infant Hercules Strangling Two Serpents, late 15th–early 16th century. Bronze. Metropolitan Museum of Art. CC0 1.0.

What is the role of graphic novels in teaching the ancient world to students? Prof. Chris Trinacty addresses this question and reviews two recent additions to the genre: Rome West and The Hero (Book Two). 

Two recent graphic novels touch upon the ancient world in fascinating ways. The first, Rome West, by Justin Giampaoli, Brian Wood, and Andrea Mutti provides an alternative history of the world predicated on the idea that a lost legion of Roman soldiers make landfall in North America in the year 323 CE. The second, The Hero, published by Dark Horse Comics in two volumes is a creative take on Heracles’ Twelve Labors that offers a mash-up of modern celebrity culture, science fiction tropes, ancient archetypes of heroism, and the visual iconography of Heracles especially from Greece vase painting.

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 10/11/2018 - 8:43pm by Christopher Trinacty.
The Annual Ancient Philosophy Workshop (42nd in the series inaugurated and periodically sponsored by The University of Texas at Austin) will be held March 8-9, 2019, at Trinity University, San Antonio, TX. This workshop is sponsored by the Trinity Philosophy Department and Trinity University Academic Affairs. Proposals are invited for papers on any problem, figure, or issue in ancient Greek and Roman philosophy, from the Presocratics to late antiquity. Each paper will be allotted forty-five minutes for oral presentation and will be followed by a response and open discussion.
 
Our keynote speaker will be Verity Harte, Yale University.
 
To propose a paper, send a 1-page abstract of 300-500 words to ancientphilworkshop@trinity.edu under the subject heading “Workshop Proposal.” Please provide contact information in the email but no identifying info in the abstract itself. Proposals are due no later than Friday, December 14, 2018. Proposers will be notified of selections by Friday, January 4, 2019.
 
Complete papers will be due to session chairs and respondents by Friday, February 15, 2019.
 
Questions and Contact
 
Damian Caluori, Associate Professor (dcaluori@trinity.edu)
 
View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 10/11/2018 - 1:41pm by Erik Shell.
“Home & Homecomings”
 
33rd Biennial Conference of the Classical Association of South Africa
Stellenbosch 7-10 November 2019

The Classical Association of South Africa (CASA) invites proposals for papers for its 33rd Biennial Conference, to be hosted by the Department of Ancient Studies at the University of Stellenbosch.

We invite submissions that focus on the conference theme “Homes & Homecomings” as well as individual proposals on other aspects of the classical world and its reception. Panels are strongly encouraged and should consist of 3 to 8 related papers put together by the panel chair. We also welcome postgraduate students currently busy with Master’s or Doctoral programmes to submit papers for a “work-in-progress” parallel session.

Please submit a paper title, an abstract (approximately 300 words), and author affiliation to Annemarie de Villiers at amdev@sun.ac.za. The deadline for proposals is 31 May 2019.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 10/08/2018 - 2:54pm by Erik Shell.

The second meeting of the North American Sections of the International Plutarch Society will take place 15-18 May 2019 at Utah State University in Logan and Park City, Utah. Logan is ninety minutes north of the Salt Lake City International hub airport and convenient to many national parks and other attractions. Plenary sessions will examine the topic of "Plutarch's Unexpected Silences" in tranquil and beautiful mountain settings as we conclude our meeting in the former mining town of Park City, Utah.

"Plutarch's Unexpected Silences" asks us to consider those times in the Parallel Lives or Moralia when we are surprised that Plutarch does not say something, or when he leaves something out. Whether this occurs by mistake or by design in Plutarch's work, we propose focusing on those passages that foil our expectations or whose silence invites a closer examination. We would also like to consider other odd omissions, perhaps of authors or works, or places even, that Plutarch might be expected to know, or even suspected of knowing.

Abstracts will be judged anonymously by the organizing committee.

The deadline for consideration is 30 November 2018.

Please see also our website: https://ipsnortham.org/.

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View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 10/08/2018 - 12:51pm by Erik Shell.

We would like to remind you of this year's call for applications for the Minority Scholarships in Classics and Classical Archaeology.

The purpose of the scholarship is to further undergraduate students’ preparation in classics or classical archaeology with opportunities not available during the school year. Eligible proposals might include (but are not limited to) participation in classical summer programs or field schools in Italy, Greece, Egypt, etc., or language training at institutions in the U.S, Canada, or Europe.

You can read more about the scholarship and how to apply here.

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(Photo: "library" by Viva Vivanista, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Mon, 10/08/2018 - 11:20am by Erik Shell.

The deadline to apply for the TLL Fellowship is November 16, 2018. The application includes many parts, and so should be started early.

Applications must be received by the deadline of Friday, November 16, 2018, at 5:00 p.m., Eastern Time. Applications should be submitted as e-mail attachments to Dr. Helen Cullyer, Executive Director, Society for Classical Studies, xd@classicalstudies.org.

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Fri, 10/05/2018 - 1:14pm by Erik Shell.

Teachers of Classics have been impacted by hurricane Florence.

ACL and SCS are launching a joint initiative that will help connect institutions in need with our members who are able to offer assistance.

If you are a teacher or faculty member at an institution whose academic programs have been interrupted, suspended, or impacted by the recent hurricane, you may fill out the form linked below to request financial assistance that will accelerate the recovery of your classes and programs. You need not be an ACL or SCS member to request help.

REQUEST FOR ASSISTANCE

Once we have received your form, an ACL or SCS staff member will contact you to verify your identity and the nature of your request. We will then publish verified requests on our websites and via our social media accounts so that our members can reach out to institutions in need and offer direct financial help. We feel that this is the quickest way of getting funds to the schools, colleges, and universities that need them.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Fri, 10/05/2018 - 10:15am by Erik Shell.
YouTube-TedEd screenshot from “A glimpse of teenage life in ancient Rome” animated by Cognitive Media and written and narrated by Ray Laurence (Image under a CC BY -- NC -- ND 4.0 International license).

In order to prepare for the SCS’s upcoming sesquicentennial at the annual meeting in San Diego from January 3-6, 2019, the SCS blog is highlighting panels, keynotes, and workshops from the schedule. Today we highlight the Animated Antiquity: A Showcase of Cartoon Representations of Ancient Greece and Rome workshop by interviewing Ray Laurence (Macquarie University) about his work using animation to teach Roman daily life.



Cartoons and Animated Films written by Ray Laurence:

A Glimpse of Teenage Life in Ancient Rome

Four Sisters in Ancient Rome

Roman Nursing Goddess – The Dea Nutrix

What is Humanities Research at the University of Kent?

How Immigration Shaped Britain – part 1

A Day in the Life of a Roman Client

Q. How was the idea of an educational cartoon first developed and pitched?

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 10/04/2018 - 2:12pm by Sarah Bond.

Last year the Classical Studies Department at the University of Michigan announced the launch of its Bridge MA, a fully funded program designed to prepare scholars from diverse backgrounds for entry into one of Michigan’s Ph.D. programs in Classical Studies or related fields. There are few programs like it, particularly at public universities. One of its architects, Professor Sara Ahbel-Rappe, recently received a competitive award for her diversity efforts. I connected with her along with Dr. Young Richard Kim, the Onassis Foundation’s new Director of Educational Programs, to discuss Michigan’s diversity efforts and its partnership with the Onassis Foundation.

View full article. | Posted in on Wed, 10/03/2018 - 6:04am by Arum Park.
April 11th-13th, 2019 – University of Kentucky – Lexington, Kentucky
Kentucky Foreign Language Conference, Classics Section

Deadline for Abstract Submission: November 12th, 2018, 11:59 PM EST

Paper presentations are 20 minutes followed by a 10-minute question & answer session. In addition to individual abstracts for paper presentations, proposals for panels of 5 papers will be considered. Papers are welcomed from graduate students, post-docs, and faculty. Abstracts should be no more than 250 words and the deadline is November 12th, 2018 before midnight EST. Online submissions https://kflc.as.uky.edu/

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 10/02/2018 - 9:19am by Erik Shell.

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