Call for Papers: Lyric Beyond Lyric

Lyric Beyond Lyric: ‘Submerged’ traditions, generic interactions, and later receptions

King’s College London, 24th May 2018

Organisers: Chiara Ciampa, Antonio Genova, Francesca Modini

As early as the Hellenistic period, the study of ancient Greek lyric poetry was identified most predominantly with the study of the nine, major canonical lyric poets and their texts. This process saw the redefinition of lyric as genre and the crystallisation of a lyric canon. The postclassical condition of lyric also influenced its Latin reception and adaptation, as it became an authoritative model for Roman poetry. The existence of an established canon, however, has often pushed to the side-lines of the lyric realm other ‘minor’ poets and song traditions. At the same time, the incorporation of lyric in other genres has been primarily acknowledged in order to detect quotations of poems or as a source of biographical information about poets. More recent scholarship, however, has broadened these narrow views of lyric by exploring the performative context and the socio-political dimension of lyric genres. Archaic song culture has been studied more and more with attention being paid both to the broader cultural discourses that lyric negotiated and to its interactions with other performative occasions and textual traditions. Equally, marginal lyric poets and texts have increasingly attracted scholarly attention.      

In the wave of this trend, this postgraduate workshop seeks to further investigate Greek and Latin lyric poetry by focusing on some of its still under-explored aspects, in an attempt to go beyond what has been most traditionally conceived as ‘lyric’. In order to broaden the conception of lyric, we aim at considering texts other than the canonical ones, as well as at exploring ancient receptions and reciprocal influences of lyric in other genres. On the one hand, we are interested in the fascinating variety of song traditions and ‘peripheral’ authors thriving in archaic and classical times, as well as in the development of lyric culture in the post-classical period. On the other, we are willing to consider how lyric poetry interacted with different literary genres, both synchronically and diachronically. We would like to look at the various ways in which lyric could overlap with contemporary genres such as philosophy and historiography, sharing not only literary patterns and motifs but also filtering thoughts and beliefs of the surrounding cultural and intellectual context. At the same time, we are interested in how lyric authors and poems have been the object of later receptions, acting as models and touchstones while being transformed and reshaped to fit new contexts and functions. 

Confirmed keynote speaker will be Prof. Pauline LeVen (Yale University).

We gratefully acknowledge the support of the Department of Classics at King’s College London, the Classical Association and the Gilbert Murray Trust. A number of postgraduate bursaries will be available to cover part of the travel expenses and/or accommodation.

We invite postgraduate students and early career researchers (within three years from PhD completion) to submit proposals for 30-minutes papers, to which academics from the Department with research interests in lyric poetry will respond chairing the discussion. Suggested topics include, but are not limited to:

  • ‘Submerged’ song traditions: e.g. Carmina popularia; anonymous hymns and cult songs of the classical, Hellenistic, and Roman periods
  • Relationship between the nine poets of the canon and ‘minor’/non-canonical poets and texts
  • Synchronic interactions with other genres: e.g. lyric poetry and the philosophical tradition; lyric poetry and historiography; lyric and rhetoric
  • Later receptions of lyric in antiquity: e.g. quotations, appropriations of lyric themes, attitudes, and gestures    

Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be sent to lyricbeyondlyric2018@gmail.com by 24th January 2018.

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(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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Plato’s Parmenides

Paris, July 15th-20th 2019

The International Plato Society organizes a symposium on a single Platonic dialogue every three years. We are pleased to announce the Call for Papers for the XII Symposium Platonicum: Plato’s Parmenides.

The Symposium will take place July 15–20, 2019, in Paris. Although the dialogue has been the object of intense scholarly scrutiny, many issues remain to be explored. Submissions on any aspect of the dialogue, including its presocratic sources as well as later reception, will be considered. We also would like to encourage papers that address issues in the dialogue’s second half since it has received relatively less attention.

We welcome abstracts from all IPS members, full and associate. If you are not yet a member of the International Plato Society, criteria for membership and information about joining are available at: https://platosociety.org/membership/.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 07/20/2018 - 10:56am by Erik Shell.
"Knockin' on Heaven's Door"
Sacred Spaces in Transition: Late AntiquityEarly Middle Ages in Iberian Peninsula
October 29-31, Madrid

Holy sites, churches, monasteries, shrines, domestic chapels, oratories, synagogues and mosques, philosophical and religious schools, populated the landscape in Late Antiquity and Early Middle Ages in the Iberian Peninsula, providing the contemporaries with the access to divine.

The nature and meaning of sacred spaces was considered by Mircea Eliade over fifty years ago in his book The sacred and the profane: the Nature of Religion (1959), when he constructed his paradigm based on Durkheim’s work, The Elementary Forms of Religious Life (London, 1915). Both scholars based their analysis on the Ancient Roman distinction between sacer and profanus using words, which originally had a spatial meaning.

This conference will try to define a theoretical approach for the transition of sacred spaces in the Iberian Peninsula between the 4th and 10th century, complemented by illustrative case studies in this area.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 07/19/2018 - 12:11pm by Erik Shell.
Timothy Perry

A Day in the Life of a Classicist is a monthly column on the SCS blog written by Prof. Ayelet Haimson Lushkov celebrating the working lives of classicists. If you’d like to share your day, let us know here. This month’s column focuses on Timothy Perry, a Special Collections Librarian at the University of Missouri.

One of the best things about working in a library is the great variety of things that I get to do. As a result, I wouldn’t say that I have too many average days, though there are several tasks that I perform pretty regularly. Most days I spend a couple of hours on the reference desk in the Special Collections & Rare Books Department, answering questions about anything from 15th-century printing techniques to how to use a microfilm reader. I am also responsible for most of the online reference questions that we receive. The majority of these come from the US, but we have had questions about our collections from researchers across Europe and Asia too.

View full article. | Posted in on Wed, 07/18/2018 - 4:16pm by Ayelet Haimson Lushkov.

(From the National Humanities Alliance)

This afternoon, the House of Representatives will consider an amendment to the FY 2019 Interior Appropriations bill that would cut the proposed FY 2019 budget of the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) by 15% or nearly $23 million. This would be a setback to the increased funding that appropriations committees in the House and the Senate have supported to date.

The House will consider this amendment TODAY.

Please click here to urge your Member of Congress to oppose the amendment and encourage others to contact their Members of Congress as well!

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 07/17/2018 - 10:00am by Erik Shell.
Battle

(From the Dartmouth News blog)

SCS Outreach Prize winner Roberta Stewart, founder of book discussion groups for veterans, held a workshop recently with Classicists from other states hoping to start similar programs.

"The workshop represents a pilot to test the ability to develop a national network of co-facilitators who work pro bono to run groups nationwide."

You can read the full article here: https://news.dartmouth.edu/news/2018/07/classics-professors-book-group-v...

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(Photo: "Painted slab of tomb with 'Duel'" by Carlo Raso, public domain)

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Mon, 07/16/2018 - 9:54am by Erik Shell.

When you do study abroad trips with college or high school students, teaching happens on-site and draws upon the artifacts that surround you. We found this out firsthand while leading the first ever 3-week study abroad summer session in Greece from 21 May to 12 June for the University of Tennessee-Knoxville’s Classics department this summer. I co-led the trip with classicist Thomas Rose. We both specialize in different areas, which really gave breadth to the teaching. Whereas Prof. Rose is an expert in Greco-Roman historiography and epigraphy, I specialize in poetry and translation while teaching at the University of Iowa. The itinerary was loosely inspired by the trips we both took to central and northern Greece as regular and student associate members of the American School for Classical Studies at Athens (ASCSA) in 2012 with our Mellon professor, Margaret M. Miles.

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 07/12/2018 - 6:52pm by Adrienne K.H. Rose.

The American Academy in Berlin invites applications for its residential fellowships for the academic year 2019/2020.

The Academy seeks to enrich transatlantic dialogue in the arts, humanities, and public policy through the development and communication of projects of the highest scholarly merit. For 2019/2020, the Academy is also interested in considering projects that address the themes of migration and social integration, questions of race in comparative perspective, and the interplay of exile and return.

For all projects, the Academy asks that candidates explain the relevance of a stay in Berlin to the development of their work.

Approximately 20 Berlin Prizes are conferred annually. Past recipients have included art historians, anthropologists, historians, musicologists, journalists, writers, filmmakers, sociologists, legal scholars, economists, and public policy experts, among others. Fellowships are typically awarded for an academic semester, but shorter stays of six to eight weeks are also possible. Benefits include round-trip airfare, partial board, a $5,000 monthly stipend, and accommodations at the Academy’s lakeside Hans Arnhold Center in the Berlin-Wannsee district.

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Wed, 07/11/2018 - 11:33am by Erik Shell.
Ancient Greek football player balancing the ball. Part of a marble grave stele, found in Piraeus, 400-375 BC. Item (NAMA) 873 of the National Archaeological Museum, Athens. Image via Wikimedia under Public Domain.

“For as long as he lives, a man has no greater glory
than that which he wins with his own hands and feet”

οὐ μὲν γὰρ μεῖζον κλέος ἀνέρος, ὄφρα κεν ᾖσιν,
ἢ ὅ τι ποσσίν τε ῥέξῃ καὶ χερσὶν ἑῇσιν.
Homer, Odyssey 8.147-148

Salve, My ancient Roman friend—I know that much of this world of ours confuses you. Not if I had ten thousand mouths and as many years could I cover the histories of the centuries between your world and ours, nor could I catalog and explain airplanes, televisions, cell phones, and the droning chorus of wonders and horrors you see around you.

But maybe I can start with something which will help bridge the gulf between your world and ours—sport. Even though the younger Pliny mocked his contemporaries for their passion for horse races, passion for sport is an ancient inheritance.

View full article. | Posted in on Tue, 07/10/2018 - 1:22pm by Joel Perry Christensen.

CFP: “Virgil and the Feminine” Vergilian Society’s Symposium Cumanum 2019

June 20-22, Villa Vergiliana, Cuma

Co-Directors: Elena Giusti (Warwick) and Victoria Rimell (Warwick)

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 07/09/2018 - 1:25pm by Erik Shell.

The Circus Maximus, the Colosseum, and the Roman Fora. What could be more Roman? These sites typically exemplify the power of the ancient Roman Empire and its lasting impact on the modern world. These are some of the definitive sites to visit on any trip to the eternal city, but how did these sites contribute to imperial propaganda and memory?

Lauren Donovan Ginsberg, Assistant Professor of Classics at the University of Cincinnati and Fellow in Ancient Studies at the American Academy in Rome and I recently organized and led a tour in Rome, entitled “Sites of Memory and Memories of Conflict: Imperial Rome, Jerusalem, and Nero,” asking just this question with the trustees of the American Academy in Rome. The Flavian dynasty, after the fall of Nero and the disastrous Year of the Four Emperors, built or added to many of modern day Rome’s most iconic buildings: the Colosseum, the Arch of Titus, the Circus Maximus (adding a triumphal arch at the eastern end), and the Templum Pacis (Temple of Peace).

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 07/05/2018 - 3:53pm by Catherine Bonesho.

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