Call for Papers: New Approaches to Ancient Greco-Roman Mediterranean

NEW APPROACHES TO THE ANCIENT GRECO-ROMAN MEDITERRANEAN

A GRADUATE SYMPOSIUM

September 28 – 30, 2018

The Program in Classical and Medieval Studies at Bates College invites papers on any topic related to new approaches to the cultures of the ancient Greco-Roman Mediterranean, for a day-long graduate symposium showcasing the work of emerging scholars (recent PhD or ABD) from historically underrepresented groups.

The symposium will showcase new work by individuals from underrepresented groups in the professoriate, specifically defined as including African Americans, Alaska Natives, Arab Americans, Asian Americans, Latinx, Native Americans, Native Hawaiians, and other Pacific Islanders.

We seek papers that examine how people (ancient through modern) have maintained or deployed the power and prestige of Greek and/or Roman culture through texts, objects, rituals, or other means. In the ancient world, Greeks and Romans interacted with each other, and with many other populations, and in these layered interactions they negotiated identities, cultural hierarchies, and relationships including to their own past. We will consider papers on such layered interactions as well as historical or contemporary adaptations of classicism. We are interested also in papers that expand the theoretical lens through which such cultural and linguistic interactions—ancient or modern—are studied. Fields may include literature, history, medicine, philosophy, religion, art, linguistics, or politics, among others.

Invited speakers will have their travel expenses covered and will be guests of the College from the evening of 9/28 through breakfast on 9/30, with all paper presentations to occur on 9/29. Twenty-minute papers will be grouped into thematic panels, with additional roundtable and Q&A formats running throughout the day. We aim to create an intellectually enriching experience for all interlocutors, including the selected speakers and the faculty and students of Bates College.

What to Submit:

  • A 300-word abstract describing the paper’s argument, critical context, and significance
  • A current cv
  • A brief statement confirming self-identification as a member of a historically underrepresented group

Where to Submit:

Abstract, cv, and statement should be submitted in PDF format by email to lmaurizi@bates.edu by April 1. Speakers will be notified of acceptance by the end of May.

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(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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The American Academy in Berlin invites applications for its residential fellowships for the academic year 2019/2020.

The Academy seeks to enrich transatlantic dialogue in the arts, humanities, and public policy through the development and communication of projects of the highest scholarly merit. For 2019/2020, the Academy is also interested in considering projects that address the themes of migration and social integration, questions of race in comparative perspective, and the interplay of exile and return.

For all projects, the Academy asks that candidates explain the relevance of a stay in Berlin to the development of their work.

Approximately 20 Berlin Prizes are conferred annually. Past recipients have included art historians, anthropologists, historians, musicologists, journalists, writers, filmmakers, sociologists, legal scholars, economists, and public policy experts, among others. Fellowships are typically awarded for an academic semester, but shorter stays of six to eight weeks are also possible. Benefits include round-trip airfare, partial board, a $5,000 monthly stipend, and accommodations at the Academy’s lakeside Hans Arnhold Center in the Berlin-Wannsee district.

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Wed, 07/11/2018 - 11:33am by Erik Shell.
Ancient Greek football player balancing the ball. Part of a marble grave stele, found in Piraeus, 400-375 BC. Item (NAMA) 873 of the National Archaeological Museum, Athens. Image via Wikimedia under Public Domain.

“For as long as he lives, a man has no greater glory
than that which he wins with his own hands and feet”

οὐ μὲν γὰρ μεῖζον κλέος ἀνέρος, ὄφρα κεν ᾖσιν,
ἢ ὅ τι ποσσίν τε ῥέξῃ καὶ χερσὶν ἑῇσιν.
Homer, Odyssey 8.147-148

Salve, My ancient Roman friend—I know that much of this world of ours confuses you. Not if I had ten thousand mouths and as many years could I cover the histories of the centuries between your world and ours, nor could I catalog and explain airplanes, televisions, cell phones, and the droning chorus of wonders and horrors you see around you.

But maybe I can start with something which will help bridge the gulf between your world and ours—sport. Even though the younger Pliny mocked his contemporaries for their passion for horse races, passion for sport is an ancient inheritance.

View full article. | Posted in on Tue, 07/10/2018 - 1:22pm by Joel Perry Christensen.

CFP: “Virgil and the Feminine” Vergilian Society’s Symposium Cumanum 2019

June 20-22, Villa Vergiliana, Cuma

Co-Directors: Elena Giusti (Warwick) and Victoria Rimell (Warwick)

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 07/09/2018 - 1:25pm by Erik Shell.

The Circus Maximus, the Colosseum, and the Roman Fora. What could be more Roman? These sites typically exemplify the power of the ancient Roman Empire and its lasting impact on the modern world. These are some of the definitive sites to visit on any trip to the eternal city, but how did these sites contribute to imperial propaganda and memory?

Lauren Donovan Ginsberg, Assistant Professor of Classics at the University of Cincinnati and Fellow in Ancient Studies at the American Academy in Rome and I recently organized and led a tour in Rome, entitled “Sites of Memory and Memories of Conflict: Imperial Rome, Jerusalem, and Nero,” asking just this question with the trustees of the American Academy in Rome. The Flavian dynasty, after the fall of Nero and the disastrous Year of the Four Emperors, built or added to many of modern day Rome’s most iconic buildings: the Colosseum, the Arch of Titus, the Circus Maximus (adding a triumphal arch at the eastern end), and the Templum Pacis (Temple of Peace).

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 07/05/2018 - 3:53pm by Catherine Bonesho.

Call for Papers

Classics and Global Humanities

Extended Deadline: 8th July, 2018

University of Ghana, Legon, Ghana

 11-12 October, 2018

Keynote Speaker

      Prof. Barbara Goff, University of Reading, Reading, UK

Studies have explored the cross-cultural engagement between Western civilisation and other cultures (Stephens and Vasunia 2010) as well as the legacy and reception of the Classics in the Arab world (Pormann 2015), India (Vasunia 2013), West Africa (Goff 2013; Goff and Simpson 2007) and recently, South Africa (Parker 2017). Classical reception studies thus continue to play a key role in bringing different parts of the world into greater dialogue with each other.

We invite abstracts for papers not only from Classics but also from other disciplines and sub-disciplines which explore ways in which reception studies is giving a new voice to classical research in West Africa, consider ways in which Classics in West Africa engages with the legacies of Egypt, Greece, and Rome or examine cross-cultural themes in both ancient and modern traditions. We also welcome papers which draw lessons from other parts of Africa and the world.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 07/03/2018 - 2:35pm by Helen Cullyer.

In spring 2018, students enrolled in the upper-level seminar “Antiquity Through a Lens” at Miami University engaged in critical study of the ways the classical world and, more specifically, ancient war narratives have been used in modern film and television to reflect on contemporary society and its conflicts.  Alongside study of ancient primary sources, students thus explored a range of concepts such as gender, class, race, religion, and even the meaning of victory itself in Troy (2004), 300 (2007), 300:  Rise of an Empire (2014), Spartacus (1960), Masada (1981), and Dragon Blade (2015).  It was the latter film, however, that provoked the most intriguing reactions from students in the course, since it forced them to view classical history for the first time through a distinctly non-Western lens. Please note that quotations in italics are taken with permission from comments students wrote when asked to reflect on what their encounter with Dragon Blade contributed to the course, CLS 361. 

View full article. | Posted in on Wed, 06/27/2018 - 4:46pm by Denise Eileen McCoskey.

XVII International ARYS Colloquium

"DRESSING DIVINELY: clothed or naked deities and devotees"

V Centenario Residence (UNEX)
Jarandilla de la Vera, 13-14 December 2018

The development of a theoretical framework for the understanding of the links between religious identity and clothing depends both on a careful terminological selection and on a broad and holistic definition of the social aspects of wear. Through the use of trappings as an effective means of communication in social interaction, it is possible to activate identities based on and assigned by social structures, especially those built on kinship, economic, religious and political activities. At the same time, clothing represents for the individual an inexhaustible source of expressive creativity that can even break the “iconographic vocabulary” of a particular social group. Moreover, the specific types and properties of clothing that convey identity may change over time in response to economic, demographic, aesthetic and technological changes. A comprehensive definition of clothing includes both body modifications and complements, the properties of which have to be analyzed together with the sensory stimuli they may evoke.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 06/27/2018 - 11:02am by Erik Shell.

The departments of Classics, Music, and Comparative Literature at King’s College London are delighted to announce a call for papers for an upcoming conference:

‘Amplifying Antiquity: Music as Classical Reception’
Strand Campus, King’s College London, December 12th-13th 2018

The focus of the conference is deliberately wide, and we welcome proposals to speak on any aspect of how the culture, history, and myth of the Greek and Roman worlds have influenced the music of the 17th-21st centuries. We hope that papers will demonstrate the scope for fresh work and new collaborations in this area.

Musical works addressed need not be conventionally viewed as part of the classical tradition. Papers might touch on topics such as: the use of antiquity in the invention of new musical genres and development of aesthetic priorities; the relationship between performative speech and song, past and present; the gendering of ancient voices in modern productions; the social contexts of musical commissioning and performance; the conservative and radical political potential in music inspired by the classical world.

Speakers already confirmed include Sina Dell’Anno (Basel), Edith Hall (KCL), Wendy Heller (Princeton), Sarah Hibberd (Bristol), and Stephanie Oade (Oxford).

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 06/26/2018 - 3:42pm by Erik Shell.

Inscriptions in Historiography and Historiography in Inscriptions. Two Sides of the Same Coin: History

King’s College London, 28th September 2018

Organisers: Steven Cosnett, Dr Giulia Donelli, Federica Scicolone

How reliable are literary quotations of inscribed texts? Why are they included in, or excluded from, historiographical narratives? Conversely, how reliable are inscriptional accounts of historical events? The issue of the relationship between epigraphic and literary texts has recently been brought into sharp relief by the publication of an inscribed dedication from the sanctuary of Apollo Ismenios at Thebes (Papazarkadas 2014: 233-48) and ensuing debate over the light it casts on Herodotus’ use of inscriptional sources (see e.g. Thonemann 2016).

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 06/26/2018 - 11:42am by Erik Shell.
Olivia Sutherland stars in MacMillan Films staging of Medea. James MacMillan (Image via Wikimedia under a CC-BY-SA 4.0 License).

In our third ‘Letters from CAMP’ blogpost, Prof. Emily Jusino discusses the trials and tribulations of picking a translation of an ancient drama for live performance.

“People expect Greek tragedy to sound a little stilted and awkward.” This is a paraphrase of a comment made to me recently by a director planning on staging the Medea. It was his defense of the translation he had chosen when I said that I disliked his choice. What made this translation appeal to him was precisely what made it seem terrible to me: the stiltedness and awkward English that comes across both as “translation-ese” and as a refusal to update any references in the text for a modern audience. But, of course, he could get the rights to use this translation for free.

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 06/21/2018 - 3:23pm by Emily Jusino.

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