Call for Papers: Orality and Literacy in the Ancient World

Orality and Literacy in the Ancient World XIII

“Orality and Literacy:  Repetition”

The Department of Classics at the University of Texas at Austin invites all classicists, historians, religious studies and biblical scholars, and scholars with an interest in oral cultures to participate in the Thirteenth Conference on Orality and Literacy in the Ancient World, to take place in Austin (TX) from Wednesday 27 March 2019 to Sunday 31 March 2019.

The conference will follow the same format as the previous conferences, held in Hobart (1994), Durban (1996), Wellington (1998), Columbia, Missouri (2000), Melbourne (2002), Winnipeg (2004), Auckland (2006), Nijmegen (2008), Canberra (2010), Ann Arbor (2012), Atlanta (2014), and Lausanne (2016). It is planned that the refereed proceedings once again be published by E.J. Brill as Volume 13 in the “Orality and Literacy in the Ancient World” series.

Location:       The University of Texas at Austin

Dates:            Wednesday 27 March (registration that evening) to Sunday 31 March 2019

Theme:          Repetition

Keynote:        Professor Ruth Scodel (Classics, University of Michigan)

The theme for the conference is “Repetition”, and papers in response to this theme are invited on topics related to the ancient Mediterranean world or, for comparative purposes, other times, places, and cultures. Also welcome are papers that engage with the transition from an oral to a literate society, or which consider the topic of reception.

Further details about accommodations and other conference-related activities will be circulated later.

Papers should be 30 minutes in length.  Any graduate student who would prefer a 20-minute paper slot is invited to express their preference in the cover email accompanying their abstract.  Anonymous abstracts of up to 350 words (not including bibliography) should be submitted as Word files by June 30, 2018.  Please send abstracts to:  OralityLiteracyxiii@austin.utexas.edu

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(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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