Call for Papers: Sapiens Ubique Civis VI

Call for Papers: Sapiens Ubique Civis VI – Szeged 2018
(PhD Student Conference on Classics, Szeged, Hungary, August 29–31. 2018)

The Department of Classical Philology and Neo-Latin Studies, Faculty of Arts, University of Szeged, Hungary is pleased to announce its International PhD Student Conference Sapiens Ubique Civis VI – Szeged 2018. The aim of the conference is to bring together an international group of young scholars working in a variety of periods, places, languages, and fields. Papers on a wide range of classical subjects, including but not limited to the literature, history, philology, philosophy, linguistics and archaeology of Greece and Rome, Byzantinology, Neo-Latin studies, and reception of the classics, as well as papers dealing with theatre studies, comparative literature, contemporary literature, and fine arts related to the Antiquity are welcome.

Lectures: The language of the conference is primarily English but German papers are welcome as well. Thematic sessions and plenary lectures will be scheduled. The time limit for each lecture is 20 minutes, followed by 5 minutes of discussion.

Abstracts: Abstracts of maximum 300 words should be sent by email as a Word attachment to sapiensuc@gmail.com strictly before June 4, 2018. The document should also contain personal information of the author, including name, affiliation and contact email address, and the title of the presentation. Acceptance notification will be sent to you until June 11, 2018.

Registration: The registration fee for the conference is 70 Euros, however for those who apply before May 20, 2018, we provide a €20 discount. The participation fee includes conference pack, reception meal, closing event, extra programs, and refreshments during coffee breaks. The participation fee does not include accommodation, but the conference coordinators will assist the conference participants in finding accommodation in the city centre. Those who intend to bring a guest are obligated to pay 20 Euros in addition to the registration fee.

Publication: All papers will be considered for publication in a peer-reviewed international journal on Classics.

Getting here: Szeged, the largest city of Southern Hungary, can be easily reached by rail from Budapest and the Budapest Ferenc Liszt International Airport (formerly known as Ferihegy Airport). The trains depart every hour between 5 AM and 9 PM. Those who prefer travelling by car can choose the European route E75, and then should take the Hungarian M5 motorway, a section of E75, passing by the city.

We look forward to your participation in this conference.

Kind regards,

Dr. János Nagyillés PhD
Head of Department, Chairman of the Conference Committee

Dr. Mariann Czerovszki PhD
Dr. Endre Ádám Hamvas PhD
Dr. Imre Áron Illés PhD
Dr. habil. Péter Kasza PhD
Dr. habil. István Lázár PhD
Dr. habil. Péter Mayer PhD
Dr. László Odrobina PhD
Dr. Ferenc Krisztián Szabó PhD
Prof. László Szörényi DSc
Dr. habil. Ibolya Tar CSc
Members of the Conference Committee

Klaudia Harcz (claulotta@gmail.com)
Attila Hajdú (attila.hajdu85@gmail.com)
Dr. Tamás Jászay PhD (jaszaytamas@gmail.com)
Dr. Gergő Gellérfi PhD (gellerfigergo@gmail.com)
Conference coordinators

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(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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Classical Charleston 2019: Diversifying Classics

The Department of Classics at the College of Charleston is pleased to announce the eighth annual colloquium of the Theodore B. Guérard Lecture Series, Classical Charleston: “Diversifying Classics.”

This colloquium focuses upon the ways in which Classics opens a window into a diverse and multicultural world, and how this diversity allows for a variety of methodological approaches and applications for cross-comparative cultural study. Discussion also turns to the structural elements that historically have constrained these approaches, and a wider discussion on how to move the discipline (and the perception of the discipline) forward into a redefinition of Classics for the 21st century.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 02/04/2019 - 9:11am by Erik Shell.
The Classical Association of New England Summer Institute
July 8-13, 2019 / Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island

E Pluribus Unum

The organizers of the 2019 CANE Summer Institute invite you to join us for a weeklong examination of peoples and cultures that comprised the Classical Greek and Roman worlds.  We will not only look at the various components of the ancient world, but we will also consider what it meant for those components to be unum.  The institute’s events and discussions will also consider modern and contemporary reflections of nationhood. 

Whether you are a high school or college teacher of Latin and/or Greek, History, English, the Arts, or other related disciplines, an undergraduate or graduate student, or a devoted lifelong learner, you will enjoy a thoughtful and enriching experience that includes a wide variety of mini-courses, lectures, workshops, reading groups, and special events while also offering many opportunities for conversation and collegial interaction among participants. CE credits available.

For more information www.caneweb.org

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View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Fri, 02/01/2019 - 8:08am by Erik Shell.
Pieter Coecke van Aelst, the elder (Flemish, 1502-1550). 'Saint Jerome in His Study,' ca. 1530. oil on panel. Walters Art Museum (37.256): Acquired by Henry Walters. Image via Wikimedia under Public Domain.

Literary translation is a scholarly and a creative act in which a reader of the Greek or Latin becomes the writer for new readers. Like all readers, translators interpret the text, and in the field of classics, apply their scholarship and their poetic abilities to put the text into a modern language. Since many readers of our translations cannot read the original, they depend on us to transmit the voice of the original writer and to be transparent in our choices. By that I mean that the translator should proclaim whether the translation is aiming for accuracy (and what that means in particular), whether it adds or subtracts from the source text (such as Richmond Lattimore inserting his own lines into Sappho’s fragments), whether the work is an adaptation rather than a translation (clearly proclaimed in Luis Alfaro’s “Mojada: A Medea in Los Angelos”).

Diane Arnson Svarlien and I co-organized “A Century of Translating Poetry” (the first panel sponsored by the Committee on the Translation of Classical Authors). The panel had a good mix of scholars, including active translators (both organizers, Gonçalves, Hadas, and Wilson), two non-translators (graduate student Lee and professor Vandiver), a poet (Hadas) and a performer of Latin poetry (Gonçalves). We had a lively discussion after the five talks with about forty audience members in a packed small room.

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 01/31/2019 - 8:37pm by Diane Rayor.

The Department of Spanish Studies and the Department of Classical Philology of the University in Lodz would like to invite you to the second interdisciplinary academic conference:

Rome and Iberia.
Diversity of Relations from Antiquity to Modernity.

April 25-26, 2019

While the Roman conquest was not the beginning of the Iberian Peninsula history, Roman presence in the region profoundly affected the lives of its inhabitants. Those relations left a permanent mark on the Peninsula and the vestiges of Ancient Roman culture still abound not only there, but also in other countries which came under Iberian influence. This issue is still avidly researched and debated by scholars of different fields.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 01/29/2019 - 8:13am by Erik Shell.

The Politics of Empire in the Roman Republic: The Forum Unbounded (280 BCE – 20 CE)

Keynote Speaker: Professor Arthur Eckstein, University of Maryland

Georgetown University’s Villa Le Balze, Fiesole, Italy
29 April – 2 May 2020

The growth of Roman power across the Mediterranean, as well as the shape it took, was dictated by debates, elections, and spectacles in the city of Rome.  But interactions in ever-shifting borderlands – among local populations and their leaders, Roman generals and armies, senatorial envoys, subcontractors, traders, translators, and more – were equally important.  “Imperial politics,” historian Charles Maier has written, “…originates from the outside in as well as proceeding from the center out” (Among Empires, p. 78).

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 01/25/2019 - 10:54am by Erik Shell.
31st INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE OF PHILOSOPHY
VOULIAGMENI (ATHENS RIVIERA)-GREECE:12-15 JULY 2019

on the topic:

"THE POSSIBILITY OF EUDAIMONIA (HAPPINESS AND HUMAN FLOURISING) IN THE WORLD TODAY"

The Conference  will be held at the seaside town of Vouliagmeni (Athens Riviera, Greece), at the Hotel Amarilia (Saint Nicholas Street 13, 16671 VOULIAGMENI, tel.+302108990391, Fax+302108955790, info@amarilia.grwww.amarilia.gr).

The IAGP calls upon philosophers and thinkers throughout the world to participate in the 31st International Conference of Philosophy.

We have selected this topic based primarily on two factors:

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Fri, 01/25/2019 - 9:28am by Erik Shell.

I love Classics, but it isn’t my first love; that was art, specifically Pre-Raphaelite art. A visit to my local museum with school introduced me to them, and my eight-year-old self thought it was fate when I found a painting with my name that I thought was by Edward Burne-Jones (Amy by Arthur Hughes; it wasn’t spelt right but it wasn’t often anyway, and still isn’t). A postcard sent shortly after the museum visit by a relative, featuring A Mermaid by John William Waterhouse (but wrongly attributed on said postcard to Burne-Jones) cemented my love of the Pre-Raphaelites, and Burne-Jones in particular.

Fast forward four years. I’m introduced to my second love – and the reason I’m writing this – Classics. Classics wasn’t my goal: I chose Latin over German as a foreign language at secondary school, with a view to becoming a veterinarian. Being a vet didn’t sound as glamorous as being an artist, so I eventually plumped for art. But Classics stayed very close to me, trumped as a subject for study at university only by my great ambition to get paid to paint pictures like Edward Burne-Jones.

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 01/24/2019 - 2:48pm by Aimee Hinds.

(Updated January 25, 2019; sent by Dimos Spatharas)

Crete/Patras Ancient Emotions Conference

Memory and Emotions in Antiquity

Dear colleagues,

We are delighted to announce the Crete/Patras Ancient Emotions III Conference on Memory and Emotions in Antiquity. The event will take place on 6-8 December 2019 at Rethymno, Crete.

We are now inviting proposals for papers of 25 minutes. Submissions should include titled abstracts (max 350 words) and a short bio (max 50 words). Please submit your proposals jointly to George Kazantzidis (gkazantzidis@upatras.gr) and Dimos Spatharas (spatharasd@gmail.com) no later than 23 February 2019.

Revised versions of papers presented at the Ancient Emotions conferences are considered for publication in the series Trends in Classics-Ancient Emotions (De Gruyter) edited by the organizers.

https://www.degruyter.com/view/product/502932

http://philology.upatras.gr/medical-understandings-emotions-antiquity/

Confirmed speakers:

Keynote speaker: Angelos Chaniotis (IAS, Princeton)

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 01/24/2019 - 8:53am by Erik Shell.

Call for Abstracts: Eleatic Ontology and Aristotle

Deadline: February 15, 2019

Eleatic Ontology and Aristotle is Volume 1d of Eleatic Ontology: Origin and Reception, a multi-volume work on the development and influence of Eleatic ontology. This project is supported by the UNESCO Chair inArchai: The Plural Origins of Western Thought at the Universidade de Brasilia. The project’s aim is to gather in one place an account of Eleatic ontology, its first developments, and its lasting influence by soliciting scholarly articles from the international academic community.The resulting publications will be digital, open-access, and free of charge. The site will be hosted by the publisher of Universidade de Coimbra, Portugal: Imprensa da Universidade de Coimbra IUC. 

Eleatic Ontology and Aristotle is edited by David Bronstein (Georgetown) and Fabián Mié (UNL Argentina). Confirmed contributors include: Lucas Angioni, Marcelo Boeri, Elisabetta Cattanei, Michel Crubellier, Rin Siirkel, Thomas Johansen, and Barbara Sattler. 

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 01/24/2019 - 8:46am by Erik Shell.
This post has been revised to include a letter from members and a response to that letter:
 
The SCS Board of Directors has approved the following statement (January 22, 2019):
 
The SCS Board of Directors condemns the practice of writing and circulating anonymous ad hominem attacks. Frank exchange among its members, including openly expressed criticism, are ideals of a scholarly community.  Anonymous attacks contradict the principle of frank exchange.
 

Letter to President Mary T. Boatwright, President-Elect Sheila Murnaghan, Immediate Past President Joseph Farrell

25 January 2019

Dear colleagues:

We write in response to the SCS Board of Directors’ statement on anonymous online attacks, published on the SCS website on January 22nd, 2019, which reads as follows:

The SCS Board of Directors condemns the practice of writing and circulating anonymous ad hominem attacks. Frank exchange among its members, including openly expressed criticism, are ideals of a scholarly community.  Anonymous attacks contradict the principle of frank exchange.

View full article. | Posted in Public Statements on Tue, 01/22/2019 - 1:44pm by Helen Cullyer.

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