Call for Papers: Sapiens Ubique Civis VI

Call for Papers: Sapiens Ubique Civis VI – Szeged 2018
(PhD Student Conference on Classics, Szeged, Hungary, August 29–31. 2018)

The Department of Classical Philology and Neo-Latin Studies, Faculty of Arts, University of Szeged, Hungary is pleased to announce its International PhD Student Conference Sapiens Ubique Civis VI – Szeged 2018. The aim of the conference is to bring together an international group of young scholars working in a variety of periods, places, languages, and fields. Papers on a wide range of classical subjects, including but not limited to the literature, history, philology, philosophy, linguistics and archaeology of Greece and Rome, Byzantinology, Neo-Latin studies, and reception of the classics, as well as papers dealing with theatre studies, comparative literature, contemporary literature, and fine arts related to the Antiquity are welcome.

Lectures: The language of the conference is primarily English but German papers are welcome as well. Thematic sessions and plenary lectures will be scheduled. The time limit for each lecture is 20 minutes, followed by 5 minutes of discussion.

Abstracts: Abstracts of maximum 300 words should be sent by email as a Word attachment to sapiensuc@gmail.com strictly before June 4, 2018. The document should also contain personal information of the author, including name, affiliation and contact email address, and the title of the presentation. Acceptance notification will be sent to you until June 11, 2018.

Registration: The registration fee for the conference is 70 Euros, however for those who apply before May 20, 2018, we provide a €20 discount. The participation fee includes conference pack, reception meal, closing event, extra programs, and refreshments during coffee breaks. The participation fee does not include accommodation, but the conference coordinators will assist the conference participants in finding accommodation in the city centre. Those who intend to bring a guest are obligated to pay 20 Euros in addition to the registration fee.

Publication: All papers will be considered for publication in a peer-reviewed international journal on Classics.

Getting here: Szeged, the largest city of Southern Hungary, can be easily reached by rail from Budapest and the Budapest Ferenc Liszt International Airport (formerly known as Ferihegy Airport). The trains depart every hour between 5 AM and 9 PM. Those who prefer travelling by car can choose the European route E75, and then should take the Hungarian M5 motorway, a section of E75, passing by the city.

We look forward to your participation in this conference.

Kind regards,

Dr. János Nagyillés PhD
Head of Department, Chairman of the Conference Committee

Dr. Mariann Czerovszki PhD
Dr. Endre Ádám Hamvas PhD
Dr. Imre Áron Illés PhD
Dr. habil. Péter Kasza PhD
Dr. habil. István Lázár PhD
Dr. habil. Péter Mayer PhD
Dr. László Odrobina PhD
Dr. Ferenc Krisztián Szabó PhD
Prof. László Szörényi DSc
Dr. habil. Ibolya Tar CSc
Members of the Conference Committee

Klaudia Harcz (claulotta@gmail.com)
Attila Hajdú (attila.hajdu85@gmail.com)
Dr. Tamás Jászay PhD (jaszaytamas@gmail.com)
Dr. Gergő Gellérfi PhD (gellerfigergo@gmail.com)
Conference coordinators

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(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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Fairfield University's Classical Studies Program is proud to invite you to a colloquium presenting original research in memory of our departed colleague, Professor Vincent J. Rosivach.
 
When: Saturday, October 13, 2018, 9 AM to 5 PM.
Where: Diffley Board Room, Bellarmine Hall, Fairfield University.
What: Guest speakers, a light breakfast, lunch, and a wine reception.
 
Confirmed Speakers:
 
Sean Gleason (If only Romans could write like Greeks: Some linguistic humor in Sallust's Catilina 8)
Judith Hallett  (Vilicus and Vilica in De Agri Cultura: the elder Cato's script for a farming couple)
David Konstan (Jesus’ Sense of Sin) 
R. James Long  (Why Fishacre? an apologia for a critical edition)
Mary Jean McNamara  (Achilles: The Internal Vision and Isolation of the Greek Hero in the Iliad)
Ann Raia (In Memoriam: Women Transcending Death in Ancient Rome)
Jennifer Roberts (Vincent Rosivach and Citizenship)
Marice Rose (From Polychrome to Monochrome: The Reception of Ancient Art by Contemporary Artists)
Katherine Schwab (Polychromy and the Parthenon Metopes)
Becky Sinos (Greek Mothers and Daughters and the Blessed Afterlife)
View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Tue, 07/31/2018 - 8:09am by Erik Shell.

(Written by Ward Briggs)

Eleanor Jane Goltz Huzar (Granger) was born on June 15, 1922, in St. Paul, Minnesota to a physician, Dr. Edward Victor Goltz, and his wife, Claire O’Neill Goltz. Raised in a family of doctors, Eleanor had every intention of becoming a doctor herself, but found “I had no talent for it,” and instead pursued her love of Roman history at the University of Minnesota (A.B., 1943) and later at Cornell (M.A. 1945; Ph.D., 1948). Her dissertation focused on the political, economic, and religious relations between the Roman Republic and Ptolemaic Egypt and she pursued the subject in a series of articles in CJ and later in a well-received biography of Marc Antony (1978), which Erich Gruen called “the best biography of Antony available in English.” She received the Prix de Rome of the AAR for 1978-80 and continued to travel in Europe during the summers. She contributed a number of deeply researched and authoritative articles on early emperors and, of course, Egypt for the encyclopedic Festschrift, Aufstieg und Niedergang der Römischen Welt.

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Fri, 07/27/2018 - 9:42am by Erik Shell.

National Humanities Fellowship

The National Humanities Center will offer up to 40 residential fellowships for advanced study in the humanities for the period September 2019 through May 2020. Applicants must have a doctorate or equivalent scholarly credentials. Mid-career and senior scholars are encouraged to apply. Emerging scholars with a strong record of peer-reviewed work may also apply. The Center does not support the revision of doctoral dissertations.

For full application information and information on the NHC visit their Fellowships page: https://nationalhumanitiescenter.org/become-a-fellow/

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(Photo: "library" by Viva Vivanista, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Fri, 07/27/2018 - 9:17am by Erik Shell.

Plato’s Parmenides

Paris, July 15th-20th 2019

The International Plato Society organizes a symposium on a single Platonic dialogue every three years. We are pleased to announce the Call for Papers for the XII Symposium Platonicum: Plato’s Parmenides.

The Symposium will take place July 15–20, 2019, in Paris. Although the dialogue has been the object of intense scholarly scrutiny, many issues remain to be explored. Submissions on any aspect of the dialogue, including its presocratic sources as well as later reception, will be considered. We also would like to encourage papers that address issues in the dialogue’s second half since it has received relatively less attention.

We welcome abstracts from all IPS members, full and associate. If you are not yet a member of the International Plato Society, criteria for membership and information about joining are available at: https://platosociety.org/membership/.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 07/20/2018 - 10:56am by Erik Shell.

In my most recent letter, I outlined the reasons why there are so few cities that can accommodate the SCS-AIA Joint Annual Meeting. That constraint has mainly to do with facilities, and it will likely remain even if we decide to meet at another time of year. In fact, it could get worse, because at another time we might face more competition from the corporate sector, and thus higher costs. But there are good reasons to consider meeting at another time of year, anyway.

View full article. | Posted in Presidential Letters on Fri, 07/20/2018 - 9:13am by Erik Shell.
"Knockin' on Heaven's Door"
Sacred Spaces in Transition: Late AntiquityEarly Middle Ages in Iberian Peninsula
October 29-31, Madrid

Holy sites, churches, monasteries, shrines, domestic chapels, oratories, synagogues and mosques, philosophical and religious schools, populated the landscape in Late Antiquity and Early Middle Ages in the Iberian Peninsula, providing the contemporaries with the access to divine.

The nature and meaning of sacred spaces was considered by Mircea Eliade over fifty years ago in his book The sacred and the profane: the Nature of Religion (1959), when he constructed his paradigm based on Durkheim’s work, The Elementary Forms of Religious Life (London, 1915). Both scholars based their analysis on the Ancient Roman distinction between sacer and profanus using words, which originally had a spatial meaning.

This conference will try to define a theoretical approach for the transition of sacred spaces in the Iberian Peninsula between the 4th and 10th century, complemented by illustrative case studies in this area.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 07/19/2018 - 12:11pm by Erik Shell.
Timothy Perry

A Day in the Life of a Classicist is a monthly column on the SCS blog written by Prof. Ayelet Haimson Lushkov celebrating the working lives of classicists. If you’d like to share your day, let us know here. This month’s column focuses on Timothy Perry, a Special Collections Librarian at the University of Missouri.

One of the best things about working in a library is the great variety of things that I get to do. As a result, I wouldn’t say that I have too many average days, though there are several tasks that I perform pretty regularly. Most days I spend a couple of hours on the reference desk in the Special Collections & Rare Books Department, answering questions about anything from 15th-century printing techniques to how to use a microfilm reader. I am also responsible for most of the online reference questions that we receive. The majority of these come from the US, but we have had questions about our collections from researchers across Europe and Asia too.

View full article. | Posted in on Wed, 07/18/2018 - 4:16pm by Ayelet Haimson Lushkov.

(From the National Humanities Alliance)

This afternoon, the House of Representatives will consider an amendment to the FY 2019 Interior Appropriations bill that would cut the proposed FY 2019 budget of the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) by 15% or nearly $23 million. This would be a setback to the increased funding that appropriations committees in the House and the Senate have supported to date.

The House will consider this amendment TODAY.

Please click here to urge your Member of Congress to oppose the amendment and encourage others to contact their Members of Congress as well!

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 07/17/2018 - 10:00am by Erik Shell.
Battle

(From the Dartmouth News blog)

SCS Outreach Prize winner Roberta Stewart, founder of book discussion groups for veterans, held a workshop recently with Classicists from other states hoping to start similar programs.

"The workshop represents a pilot to test the ability to develop a national network of co-facilitators who work pro bono to run groups nationwide."

You can read the full article here: https://news.dartmouth.edu/news/2018/07/classics-professors-book-group-v...

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(Photo: "Painted slab of tomb with 'Duel'" by Carlo Raso, public domain)

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Mon, 07/16/2018 - 9:54am by Erik Shell.

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