Call for Papers: "Screening the 'Political Animals' of the Ancient Mediterranean"

CALL FOR PAPERS

Classical Antiquity: Screening the “political animals” of the Ancient Mediterranean world

An area of multiple panels for the 2018 Film & History Conference:

Citizenship and Sociopathy in Film, Television, and New Media

November 7-12, 2018

Madison Concourse Hotel and Governor’s Club, Madison, WI (USA)

Full details at: www.filmandhistory.org/conference

DEADLINE for abstracts: 1 June 2018 

Aristotle famously defined humans as “political animals”: organizing themselves within the social structure of the polis and its codes of conduct, defining members from outsiders and different types of member in relation to each other and to the whole. From the time of the city’s foundation, Romans were no less concerned with the civitas and citizen status — increasingly so as Roman imperium expanded to encompass ethnic “Others.” The narratives generated and consumed by these societies both acknowledged and questioned the clarity of these theoretical concepts: the Odyssey marks Penelope’s aristocratic suitors as morally base and condemns them to divinely-authorized death worthy of enemies; Herodotus and Thucydides observe the increasingly despotic behavior of democratic Athens, as compared to both “barbarian” and other Greek adversaries; Livy emphasizes how abducted Sabine women stopped a war by asserting their own status and moral authority as Roman wives. Perhaps Julius Caesar would have been reviled as a traitor for his march on Rome, like the failed insurrectionary Catiline, had Caesar’s heir Octavian not gained control over the state, proclaiming the assassinated dictator in perpetuo divine and himself princeps.

All depictions of socio-political relations within the frameworks of kingdom, ethnospoliscivitas, and empire in the ancient Mediterranean world have been shaped and reshaped through the lens of subsequent interest—both in antiquity and in modernity. The Classical Antiquity area solicits abstracts for papers that discuss how film, television, video games, and other screen media represent these relations and frameworks, on topics including but not limited to:

--how representations help modern audiences to imagine those social relations through dramatization — or promise to, despite reshaping ancient accounts to modern tastes

--how representations radically re-envision ancient accounts of political actors and communities to suit contemporary purposes (e.g. the noble rebel Spartacus in Kubrick’s 1960 film or the vengeful survivor Artemisia in 2013’s300: Rise of an Empire)

--how modern social constructs (e.g. race, sexuality, gender) have been retrojected into depictions of ancient communities and individuals’ relations to each other and that whole

--how depictions of epochal shifts (e.g. constitutional, epistemological) redefine enfranchised/disenfranchised, subversive/revolutionary, patriot/traitor, barbarian/civilized

--how a “bad ruler/system” is critiqued by focus on a good/conscientious community member, or a “good ruler/system” is destroyed by criminality/sociopathy

--“rise and/or fall” narratives that turn on revolution, civil war, tyrannical coup, restoration

--use of ancient Mediterranean societies to stage modern romance with e.g. democracy, republicanism, fascism, imperialism

Proposals for complete panels of three related presentations are also welcome, but should include an abstract and contact information (including email) for each presenter.

Please e-mail your 200-400-word proposal to the area chair:

Meredith Safran

Trinity College

classicsonscreen@gmail.com

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(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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In a photo essay, Roman tour guide and classicist Agnes Crawford spoke to the SCS Blog about the newly reopened House of Augustus on the Palatine, which was uncovered by archaeologists in the early 1960s. Although it underwent extensive renovations for the events surrounding the  2000th anniversary of Augustus' death in 2014, other portions have now been reopened to the public in time for the summer crowds. Crawford also comments on the myriad restoration projects going on in Rome, Pompeii, and elsewhere in Italy. Together, these initiatives are bringing the color and grandeur of the ancient world back to life within Italy. 





"Coffered" painted ceiling in the newly reopened House of Augustus on the Palatine in Rome. Image by Agnes Crawford and used by permission.

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The deadline for nominations for the SCS Awards for Excellence in the Teaching of Classics at the College Level is June 1, 2018.

You can find more information about the award and nomination process here.

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(Photo: "library" by Viva Vivanista, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Thu, 05/17/2018 - 10:41am by Erik Shell.
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The SCS has learned from Anatole Mori that the Department of Ancient Mediterranean Studies Graduate Program at the University of Missouri will not be discontinued.

Here is her full statement:

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Thu, 05/17/2018 - 8:23am by Erik Shell.

(Written by Robert Gurval and David Blank)

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View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Wed, 05/16/2018 - 3:18pm by Erik Shell.

Call For Abstracts: 2nd Meeting of the North American Workshop in Platonic Philosophy

Hamline University, Aug 14-15, 2018

Special theme:
The Timaeus and its Reception

Abstracts of 400-500 words on Plato and the Platonic tradition will be accepted until June 15, 2018. Proposals on the theme of the Timaeus and its reception will be given special consideration, as well as papers on related topics like natural philosophy and cosmology in the Phaedo, Statesman, Laws, and other dialogues; in other contemporaneous Socratic authors such as Xenophon and Aeschines; or in the writings of Platonists from antiquity to the modern period. Papers on any aspect of the philosophy of Plato or the Platonic tradition are however encouraged and welcome.

A limited number of low-cost, on campus accommodations are available on a first-come, first-serve basis. Hamline University is located in the vibrant twin cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul. Workshop registration is $30 and an optional closing banquet is $35.

Please submit abstracts to Conference organizers:

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 05/16/2018 - 9:09am by Erik Shell.
Sousse Mosaic, CC BY-SA 3.0, Ad Meskens

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View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 05/14/2018 - 4:38pm by Christopher Bungard.
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Microphone

Multiple proponents of Spoken Latin in the classroom - Edward Zarrow, Tom Morris, and Jason Pedicone - were recently featured on the "America the Bilingual" podcast.

"How has a presumably dead language become such a disruptor? Because Latin certainly seems to be just that. It’s one of the most frequently taught languages in American schools."

You can listen to the podcast in-browser here: http://www.americathebilingual.com/in-case-you-thought-latin-was-dead/

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(Photo: "Audio Bokeh" by Alan Levine, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Tue, 05/08/2018 - 2:06pm by Erik Shell.

This is a reminder for upcoming deadlines for SCS Awards and Prizes. Follow the linked URLs for more information on the nomination materials and the prizes themselves.

Excellence in the Teaching of Classics at the College Level: June 1, 2018

SCS Outreach Prize: September 14, 2018

Excellence in Teaching at the Precollegiate Level: October 2, 2018

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(Photo: "library" by Viva Vivanista, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Mon, 05/07/2018 - 12:31pm by Erik Shell.
Composite RGB image of manuscript E3, Escorialensis 291 (Υ.i.1): overview of folio 32 recto Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

The Homer Multitext (HMT) has something in common with the poetry it documents: They are both monumental and impressive works whose gradual evolution over many years by many hands has left traces of its past; it exists in several forms that present the same information in slightly different ways, and its development through changing technologies has left occasional redundancies. Like the Iliad, it lives up to its title, but perhaps not in the way one expects. And like its poetic source text, it richly rewards those who plumb its depths.

View full article. | Posted in on Sun, 05/06/2018 - 1:02pm by Bill Beck.

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