Call for Papers: Transdisciplinary Conference on Distributed Authorship

"author.net"

a transdisciplinary conference on distributed authorship

UCLA, October 5-7 2018.
Co-Organizers, Francesca Martelli and Sean Gurd

DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACTS: January 15, 2018

Long associated with pre-modern cultures, the notion of “distributed authorship” still serves as a mainstay for the study of Classical antiquity, which takes 'Homer' as its foundational point of orientation, and which, like many other disciplines in the humanities, has extended its insights into the open-endedness of oral and performance traditions into its study of textual dynamics as well. The rise of genetic criticism within textual studies bears witness to this urge to fray perceptions of the hermetic closure of the written, and to expose the multiple strands of collaboration and revision that a text may contain. And the increasingly widespread use of the multitext in literary editions of authors from Homer to Joyce offers a material manifestation of this impulse to display the multiple different levels and modes of distribution at work in the authorial process. In many areas of the humanities that rely on traditional textual media, then, the distributed author is alive and well, and remains a current object of study.

In recent years, however, the dynamic possibilities of distributed authorship have accelerated most rapidly in media associated with the virtual domain, where modes of communication have rendered artistic creation increasingly collaborative, multi-local and open-ended. These developments have prompted important questions on the part of scholars who study these new media about the ontological status of the artistic, musical and literary objects that such modes of distribution (re)create. In musicology, for example, musical modes such as jazz improvisation and digital experimentation are shown to exploit the complex relay of creativity within and between the ever-expanding networks of artists and audiences involved in their production and reception, and construct themselves in ways that invite others to continue the process of their ongoing distribution. The impact of such artistic developments on the identity of 'the author' may be measured by developments in copyright law, such as the emergence of the Creative Commons, an organization that enables artists and authors to waive copyright restrictions on co-creators in order to facilitate their collaborative participation. And this mode of distribution has in turn prompted important questions about the orientation of knowledge and power in the collectives and publics that it creates.

This conference seeks to deepen and expand the theorising of authorial distribution in all areas of human culture. Ultimately, our aim is to develop and refine a set of conceptual tools that will bring distributed authorship into a wider remit of familiarity, and to explore whether these tools are, in fact, unique to the new media that have inspired their most recent discursive formulation, or whether they have a range of application that extends beyond the virtual domain.

We invite contributions from those who are engaged directly with the processes and media that are pushing and complicating ideas of distributed authorship in the world today, and also from those who are actively drawing on insights derived from these contemporary developments in their interpretation of the textual and artistic processes of the past, on the following topics (among others):

·       The distinctive features of the new artistic genres and objects generated by modes of authorial distribution, from musical mashups to literary centones.
·       The impact that authorial distribution has on the temporality of its objects, as the multiple agents that form part of the distribution of those objects spread the processes of their decomposition/re-composition over time.
·       The re-orienting of power relations that arises from the distribution of authorship among networks of senders and receivers, as also from the collapsing of 'sender' and 'receiver' functions into one another.
·       The modes of 'self'-regulation that authorial collectives develop in order to sustain their identity.
·       Fandom and participatory culture, in both virtual and traditional textual media.
·       The operational dynamics of 'multitexts' and 'text networks', and their influence by/on virtual networks.

Paper proposals will be selected for their potential to open up questions that transcend the idiom of any single medium and/or discipline.

Please send a proposal of approximately 500 words to gurds@missouri.edu by January 15, 2018.

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(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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A Mid-Republican House at Gabii is an ambitious project. It extends the born-digital movement in archaeology, in that the final publication of an excavation is a website with an ISBN and long-term hosting by the University of Michigan. In addition to a traditional presentation of the finds, the publication includes the full excavation database disseminated through the Archaeological Recording Kit (ARK). The resource also presents the architectural remains and contexts in an interactive 3-D environment, coded using the gaming platform Unity. The latter two components of this forward-looking publication especially merit review as a digital project. Does the Gabii publication represent a competitive alternative to the traditional format of the excavation monograph?

Text

The Tincu house—named after a donor who provided funding and volunteered during the excavations—was built ca. 280–260 BCE within a plot left open for more than a century following the establishment of Gabii’s street network around 400 BCE. Domestic activity continued until roughly 100 BCE, after which the structure was substantially reconfigured, apparently to serve as an annex for a public building nearby. By the middle of the 1st century CE the annex was abandoned.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 09/25/2017 - 12:00am by Philip Sapirstein.

(From Philip Soergel, Chair of the Department of History, University of Maryland, College Park)

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Fri, 09/22/2017 - 8:02am by Erik Shell.

The deadline to receive nominations for the SCS Award for Exellence in Precollegiate Teaching has been extended to October 2, 2017.

Teachers, full- or part-time, of grades K-12 in schools in the United States and Canada who at the time of the application teach at least one class of Latin, Greek, or classics at the K-12 level are eligible.

Nominees do not have to be SCS members.

To learn more about the nomination process, visit the award's webpage.

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(Photo: "library" by Viva Vivanista, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Wed, 09/20/2017 - 9:08am by Erik Shell.

The Committee on Diversity in the Profession of the Society for Classical Studies (SCS) invites applications from minority undergraduate students from across North America for scholarships to be awarded for Summer 2018. The purpose of the scholarship is to further students’ study of classics or classical archaeology with opportunities not available during the school year. Eligible proposals might include (but are not limited to) participation in classical summer programs or field schools in the Mediterranean or language training at institutions in the U.S., Canada, or Europe. The maximum amount of each award will be $4,500.

The receipt deadline for applications is 5:00 p.m. Eastern Time, December 8, 2017; results will be announced by the end of January 2018.  All application materials should be sent as e-mail attachments to the Executive Director of the SCS, Dr. Helen Cullyer, at helen.cullyer@nyu.edu.

To learn more about the scholarship and how to apply, visit the scholarship's webpage.

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View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Wed, 09/20/2017 - 9:02am by Erik Shell.

The Latin and Linguistics Workshop (LLW) combines the field of Linguistics and the teaching of Latin. The goals of the LLW include:

  • The discussion of current issues surrounding Latin instruction and the tools of Linguistics to revitalize the teaching of Latin
  • The discussion of current issues surrounding the teaching of Linguistics at the high school level and the creation of a new Advanced Placement (AP) course and exam in Linguistics

Keynote speaker: Prof. Renato Oniga Università di Udine (Italy) Author of Latin: A Linguistic Introduction

Dates: October 13-14, 2017
Location: Stony Brook University
Contact: llw@stonybrook.edu

Registration is free.

Conference Website: www.stonybrook.edu/llw

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View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Tue, 09/19/2017 - 10:33am by Erik Shell.

(From our colleagues at Wadham College)

It is with great sadness that we announce the sudden death of Emeritus Fellow and Classicist James Morwood, at the age of 73, while on holiday in Greece. Details of a memorial service will be published in due course.

Below is a list of his accomplishments, adapted from his biography at Wadham College:

James Morwood was elected to a Fellowship at Wadham College in 1996, where he taught and served as Dean of Degrees, Steward of Common Room, and Dean (the last post from 2000 to 2006). He became an Emeritus Fellow in 2006 and was the Editor of the Wadham Gazette.

James was educated at Peterhouse, Cambridge, where he sat Part I of the Classical Tripos and Part II of the English Tripos. After a year at Merton College, Oxford on the course for the Diploma of Education, he went to Harrow School in September 1966 to teach Classics and English. He spent 30 years at Harrow, the last seventeen of them as Head of Classics. He was deeply involved in school journalism and drama, working with Richard Curtis and Ben Cumberbatch among many others. He was librarian for more than eleven years, and sat on and later chaired the school’s Treasures Committee, a body which brought into existence the Old Speech Room Gallery.

In 1996 he moved to Oxford University and took up the post of Grocyn Lecturer in the Classics Faculty and served for a year as President of the Oxford Philological Society.

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Mon, 09/18/2017 - 1:50pm by Erik Shell.
Aeneas Departs from Carthage (Aeneid, Book IV)

Intermediate Latin students typically encounter Latin poetry for the first time with Vergil’s Aeneid. After a brief tutorial on the rules and patterns of dactylic hexameter, they plunge in with arma virumque cano. They learn scansion not only for the sake of tradition and proper understanding of the poem, but also so that they can appreciate its rhythms and artistry—the same reasons English teachers have for teaching their students iambic pentameter for Shakespeare. The symphony of “longs and shorts” can seem forbidding to students at first, and the remedy for this is most often simply practice. Today, given the convenience of phone and tablet apps, and their potential to transform idle moments of otium into more productive ones, the Pericles Group, LLC has created the Latin Scansion App to help Latin AP students practice scanning Vergil. Aulus Gellius, who scraped together his Attic Nights from omnia subsiciva et subsecundaria tempora (“all my spare and third rate time” praef. 23), would no doubt approve.

The title screen has three main buttons: Marathon, Timed, and Achievements. “Marathon” allows the user to select a range of lines from the AP syllabus and to scan them in an untimed session.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 09/18/2017 - 12:00am by Patrick Paul Hogan.

Classical Representations in Popular Culture

The Southwest Popular / American Culture Association (SWPACA) will once again be sponsoring sessions on CLASSICAL REPRESENTATIONS IN POPULAR CULTURE at their 39th annual conference, February 7-10, 2018 at Hyatt Regency Hotel and Conference Center in beautiful Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Papers on any aspect of Greek and Roman antiquity in contemporary culture are eligible for consideration.

Potential topics include:

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 09/15/2017 - 3:23pm by Erik Shell.

Tacitus’ Wonders
Conference at Victoria University of Wellington, 27-29 August 2018
First call for papers

Readers have been attracted to the remarkable and wondrous, the admirable and the uncanny in Tacitus. But in order to appreciate what is mirum or novum, we also need to understand the apparently mundane material between the monstra. Tacitus famously derides the praises of new public buildings as a topic more worthy of the daily gazette than illustres annales (A. 13.31.1); his own criteria for selection, however, and his own judgments on what is worthy of note, have often differed in interesting ways from the preoccupations of his readers.

Abstracts (250 words) are invited on the topic of Tacitus’ wonders.
Submissions on comparative material are very much welcome.

Reflection is invited on the consequences of different methods of dividing or reconciling historical events and historiographical representation, e.g. Woodman (1993), O’Gorman (2001), Haynes (2003), and Sailor (2008). In preparing abstracts, it will be helpful to consider the challenge extended by Dench (in Feldherr, 2009), the ‘awkward question’ of whether the much admired Tacitean text ‘represents anything other than itself’. Papers treating the Classical tradition, reception and history of scholarship are welcome.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 09/15/2017 - 1:38pm by Erik Shell.

Human | Nature: Environmental Humanities in Historical Perspective

March 23-24, 2018

The Ohio State University
Columbus, Ohio

Keynote Speaker: Timothy Saunders, Volda University College

Opening Remarks: Chris Otter, The Ohio State University

The Ohio State University Department of Classics, in collaboration with OSU’s Discovery Theme for Environmental Humanities and the Humanities Institute, is proud to announce its 15th annual graduate student colloquium.

A sense of urgency characterizes contemporary discussions about ecological welfare and anthropogenic effects on the non-human environment. At the core of this discourse lie questions with a long history of artistic, philosophical, political and religious expression. The proper management of space and resources, the negotiation of shifting boundaries between the “human” and “natural” worlds (however one chooses to define these categories), as well as the contemplation of humanity’s place among the living and nonliving co-inhabitants of Earth are all pursuits basic to human survival and livelihood. Moreover, the ways earlier generations found to represent the natural world they experienced and their human community's place within it have shaped the way we think and talk about such matters today.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 09/15/2017 - 1:06pm by Erik Shell.

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