Call for Papers: Transdisciplinary Conference on Distributed Authorship

"author.net"

a transdisciplinary conference on distributed authorship

UCLA, October 5-7 2018.
Co-Organizers, Francesca Martelli and Sean Gurd

DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACTS: January 15, 2018

Long associated with pre-modern cultures, the notion of “distributed authorship” still serves as a mainstay for the study of Classical antiquity, which takes 'Homer' as its foundational point of orientation, and which, like many other disciplines in the humanities, has extended its insights into the open-endedness of oral and performance traditions into its study of textual dynamics as well. The rise of genetic criticism within textual studies bears witness to this urge to fray perceptions of the hermetic closure of the written, and to expose the multiple strands of collaboration and revision that a text may contain. And the increasingly widespread use of the multitext in literary editions of authors from Homer to Joyce offers a material manifestation of this impulse to display the multiple different levels and modes of distribution at work in the authorial process. In many areas of the humanities that rely on traditional textual media, then, the distributed author is alive and well, and remains a current object of study.

In recent years, however, the dynamic possibilities of distributed authorship have accelerated most rapidly in media associated with the virtual domain, where modes of communication have rendered artistic creation increasingly collaborative, multi-local and open-ended. These developments have prompted important questions on the part of scholars who study these new media about the ontological status of the artistic, musical and literary objects that such modes of distribution (re)create. In musicology, for example, musical modes such as jazz improvisation and digital experimentation are shown to exploit the complex relay of creativity within and between the ever-expanding networks of artists and audiences involved in their production and reception, and construct themselves in ways that invite others to continue the process of their ongoing distribution. The impact of such artistic developments on the identity of 'the author' may be measured by developments in copyright law, such as the emergence of the Creative Commons, an organization that enables artists and authors to waive copyright restrictions on co-creators in order to facilitate their collaborative participation. And this mode of distribution has in turn prompted important questions about the orientation of knowledge and power in the collectives and publics that it creates.

This conference seeks to deepen and expand the theorising of authorial distribution in all areas of human culture. Ultimately, our aim is to develop and refine a set of conceptual tools that will bring distributed authorship into a wider remit of familiarity, and to explore whether these tools are, in fact, unique to the new media that have inspired their most recent discursive formulation, or whether they have a range of application that extends beyond the virtual domain.

We invite contributions from those who are engaged directly with the processes and media that are pushing and complicating ideas of distributed authorship in the world today, and also from those who are actively drawing on insights derived from these contemporary developments in their interpretation of the textual and artistic processes of the past, on the following topics (among others):

·       The distinctive features of the new artistic genres and objects generated by modes of authorial distribution, from musical mashups to literary centones.
·       The impact that authorial distribution has on the temporality of its objects, as the multiple agents that form part of the distribution of those objects spread the processes of their decomposition/re-composition over time.
·       The re-orienting of power relations that arises from the distribution of authorship among networks of senders and receivers, as also from the collapsing of 'sender' and 'receiver' functions into one another.
·       The modes of 'self'-regulation that authorial collectives develop in order to sustain their identity.
·       Fandom and participatory culture, in both virtual and traditional textual media.
·       The operational dynamics of 'multitexts' and 'text networks', and their influence by/on virtual networks.

Paper proposals will be selected for their potential to open up questions that transcend the idiom of any single medium and/or discipline.

Please send a proposal of approximately 500 words to gurds@missouri.edu by January 15, 2018.

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(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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Members can click here to access our online program system for 2019 Annual Meeting submissions, affiliated group charters, and proposals for organizer-refereed panels for 2020.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 02/19/2018 - 6:56am by Helen Cullyer.

by  Erich Gruen

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View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 02/15/2018 - 10:10pm by Wells Hansen.
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(From the Cornell Alumni Magazine)

A former translator of the Pope's messages into Latin has joined the Cornell faculty to spread the practice of spoken Latin in the classroom.

"He took students on forays around campus to translate the Latin incorporated in maps and artwork; had them haggle with each other in ersatz marketplaces; studied the Latin mottos on state seals; cast them in a mock trial for shoplifting; and more."

You can read the full article here.

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(Photo: "Piazza San Pietro Fountain" by Dennis Jarvis, licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Thu, 02/15/2018 - 11:04am by Erik Shell.
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View full article. | Posted in on Wed, 02/14/2018 - 5:21pm by Sara L. Hales.

The Classical Association of the Atlantic States (CAAS) is seeking applications for two key positions: Treasurer and Annual Meeting Program Coordinator. Job description(s) and application information is on the main page of the CAAS website: http://caas-cw.org/wp/.

The deadline has been extended to March 2, 2018.

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 02/14/2018 - 8:47am by Erik Shell.

The SCS is a member of the National Humanities Alliance (NHA), a national advocacy organization for the humanities.  The NHA has issued the following information regarding the administration’s budget proposal for fiscal year 19:

“President Trump released his Presidential Budget Request for FY 2019, which again calls for the elimination of the National Endowment for the Humanities along with the National Endowment for the Arts, the Department of Education’s International Education Programs, the National Historical Publications and Records Commission, and the Institute for Museums and Library Services. The request also calls for the elimination of federal funding for the Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars.

This is an assault on humanities research, education, and programming - all of which are essential to the cultivation of our national heritage and civic culture.

Congress will ultimately be responsible for writing the bills that fund the federal government.

Last year, we sent a forceful message to Congress that we oppose the administration’s efforts to eliminate humanities funding. While the appropriations process for FY 2018 has not yet been completed, Congress has rejected Trump’s proposals at every turn.”

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 02/13/2018 - 9:53am by Helen Cullyer.

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View full article. | Posted in Public Statements on Tue, 02/13/2018 - 9:19am by Helen Cullyer.

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The Congress will take place at the Institute of Education (University College London) in Bloomsbury, close to the British Museum, British Library, and the University of London’s Senate House. 

The FIEC AGM and Bureau Meetings will take place on Thursday 4 July. The Congress will begin on Friday 5 July and end on Monday 8 July. There will be three different types of paper: plenary papers delivered by invited speakers; panels consisting of four papers; and posters. A call for panels, papers and posters will be issued in May, with a deadline for submission of 1 July. There will be a drinks reception, a flying buffet, excursions, workshops and various cultural activities taking place throughout the Congress. 

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Tue, 02/13/2018 - 7:37am by Erik Shell.

Call for Papers: Sapiens Ubique Civis VI – Szeged 2018
(PhD Student Conference on Classics, Szeged, Hungary, August 29–31. 2018)

The Department of Classical Philology and Neo-Latin Studies, Faculty of Arts, University of Szeged, Hungary is pleased to announce its International PhD Student Conference Sapiens Ubique Civis VI – Szeged 2018. The aim of the conference is to bring together an international group of young scholars working in a variety of periods, places, languages, and fields. Papers on a wide range of classical subjects, including but not limited to the literature, history, philology, philosophy, linguistics and archaeology of Greece and Rome, Byzantinology, Neo-Latin studies, and reception of the classics, as well as papers dealing with theatre studies, comparative literature, contemporary literature, and fine arts related to the Antiquity are welcome.

Lectures: The language of the conference is primarily English but German papers are welcome as well. Thematic sessions and plenary lectures will be scheduled. The time limit for each lecture is 20 minutes, followed by 5 minutes of discussion.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 02/09/2018 - 2:53pm by Erik Shell.

CALL FOR PAPERS: Manipulation of discourse in antiquity
Stellenbosch Winelands Classics
12-14 November 2018

This is an open invitation to scholars of antiquity to submit proposals for papers on the topic as set out below.

The conference aims to explore the phenomenon of discourse manipulation for the purpose of establishing and/or maintaining hegemony over views generally held by the public on a particular issue or event.  The aim is to focus on calculated control over public opinion in the political, religious, social, or similar spheres. This would include narratives that invent, reshape or guard over a particular point of view or version and purposeful selective memory on the one hand, and narratives that contest, marginalize and suppress alternative views by ignoring, labelling and smearing opposing voices on the other. The conference organizers will consider papers in the fields of ancient history, literature and material culture concerned with any form of public discourse management and ‘limiting the spectrum of acceptable opinion’ (Chomsky).

Please submit titles and abstracts of approximately 300 words to Philip Bosman (bosmapr@sun.ac.za) or Annemaré Kotze (ak5@sun.ac.za) by 31 May 2018. Further details on the conference will be communicated shortly after the deadline.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 02/09/2018 - 2:01pm by Erik Shell.

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