Call for Papers: Transdisciplinary Conference on Distributed Authorship

"author.net"

a transdisciplinary conference on distributed authorship

UCLA, October 5-7 2018.
Co-Organizers, Francesca Martelli and Sean Gurd

DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACTS: January 15, 2018

Long associated with pre-modern cultures, the notion of “distributed authorship” still serves as a mainstay for the study of Classical antiquity, which takes 'Homer' as its foundational point of orientation, and which, like many other disciplines in the humanities, has extended its insights into the open-endedness of oral and performance traditions into its study of textual dynamics as well. The rise of genetic criticism within textual studies bears witness to this urge to fray perceptions of the hermetic closure of the written, and to expose the multiple strands of collaboration and revision that a text may contain. And the increasingly widespread use of the multitext in literary editions of authors from Homer to Joyce offers a material manifestation of this impulse to display the multiple different levels and modes of distribution at work in the authorial process. In many areas of the humanities that rely on traditional textual media, then, the distributed author is alive and well, and remains a current object of study.

In recent years, however, the dynamic possibilities of distributed authorship have accelerated most rapidly in media associated with the virtual domain, where modes of communication have rendered artistic creation increasingly collaborative, multi-local and open-ended. These developments have prompted important questions on the part of scholars who study these new media about the ontological status of the artistic, musical and literary objects that such modes of distribution (re)create. In musicology, for example, musical modes such as jazz improvisation and digital experimentation are shown to exploit the complex relay of creativity within and between the ever-expanding networks of artists and audiences involved in their production and reception, and construct themselves in ways that invite others to continue the process of their ongoing distribution. The impact of such artistic developments on the identity of 'the author' may be measured by developments in copyright law, such as the emergence of the Creative Commons, an organization that enables artists and authors to waive copyright restrictions on co-creators in order to facilitate their collaborative participation. And this mode of distribution has in turn prompted important questions about the orientation of knowledge and power in the collectives and publics that it creates.

This conference seeks to deepen and expand the theorising of authorial distribution in all areas of human culture. Ultimately, our aim is to develop and refine a set of conceptual tools that will bring distributed authorship into a wider remit of familiarity, and to explore whether these tools are, in fact, unique to the new media that have inspired their most recent discursive formulation, or whether they have a range of application that extends beyond the virtual domain.

We invite contributions from those who are engaged directly with the processes and media that are pushing and complicating ideas of distributed authorship in the world today, and also from those who are actively drawing on insights derived from these contemporary developments in their interpretation of the textual and artistic processes of the past, on the following topics (among others):

·       The distinctive features of the new artistic genres and objects generated by modes of authorial distribution, from musical mashups to literary centones.
·       The impact that authorial distribution has on the temporality of its objects, as the multiple agents that form part of the distribution of those objects spread the processes of their decomposition/re-composition over time.
·       The re-orienting of power relations that arises from the distribution of authorship among networks of senders and receivers, as also from the collapsing of 'sender' and 'receiver' functions into one another.
·       The modes of 'self'-regulation that authorial collectives develop in order to sustain their identity.
·       Fandom and participatory culture, in both virtual and traditional textual media.
·       The operational dynamics of 'multitexts' and 'text networks', and their influence by/on virtual networks.

Paper proposals will be selected for their potential to open up questions that transcend the idiom of any single medium and/or discipline.

Please send a proposal of approximately 500 words to gurds@missouri.edu by January 15, 2018.

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(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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Marble left hand holding a scroll

Co-authored with Richard J. Tarrant.

Editor’s note: The guidelines under review here, while publicly available for comment, represent a pre-release version.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 12/04/2017 - 12:00am by Donald J. Mastronarde.

Update, December 31, 2017:  Mark Thompson is unable to attend the Rhetoric panel due to unforseen circumstances.  In his place, Professor James Engell, Harvard University, will be speaking.

Dear Attendees:

The 2018 SCS-AIA Meeting in Boston is just a month away! The Program Committee has worked hard to put together a rewarding and stimulating meeting and, as Vice President for Programs, I am particularly pleased by the growing number of panels – some 18 were accepted for the Boston meeting, an increase by three over last year. I want now to call your attention to a few of the exciting events that are planned.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Tue, 11/28/2017 - 11:31am by Erik Shell.
The Society for Classical Studies has signed on to a statement urging Congress to reject the proposed tax on graduate student tuition waivers.
 
You can read the full statement and list of signatories here:
 
 
 

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 11/28/2017 - 8:52am by Erik Shell.
Mosaic depicting theatrical masks of Tragedy and Comedy

Co-authored with T.H.M Gellar-Goad.

Ancient comedy was a thoroughly performative genre, meant to be seen and heard, not read. This point should be obvious, but it can easily get lost in a traditional college or university course on comedy in translation, given the textual nature of the transmission of comedies, their distance in time and culture, the difficulties presented by translated material, and the demands and traditions of teaching Greek and Roman literature generally. In this post I describe a comedy-in-performance assignment that T.H.M Gellar-Goad and I created and have used in teaching general-education courses at two different American universities. One of us employed it in lieu of the usual final exam and term paper; the other was bound by writing seminar standards to include a term paper in addition to the performance project. The basic idea is flexible enough to fit drama of any period or genre, and could be used in various levels and types of courses (not, admittedly, massive lecture courses), for teaching in the original languages, and for inclusion as a smaller unit within a larger course. Neither of us had prior experience acting or directing.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 11/27/2017 - 12:43pm by Serena S Witzke.
Duke

Gabrielle C. Stewart, a senior Classical Languages major at Duke University, has been named a Rhodes Scholar for 2018.

"In her time at Duke, she has demonstrated great leadership both on campus and off through her social justice work and her research on ancient Greece."

To read the full write-up, check out the article featured on Duke's website here.

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(Photo: "Duke University" by Ilyse Whitney, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Wed, 11/22/2017 - 10:47am by Erik Shell.

We've put together a list of the special events that will take place at the 2018 Annual Meeting.

Note that, while paper sessions will take place in the Marriott, a large portion of the evening events will be housed in the Westin.

The upcoming December Newsletter from the SCS office will have more information about these and other events at the Annual Meeting.

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 11/22/2017 - 10:39am by Erik Shell.
Advanced Seminar in the Humanities 2018– 2019
Literature and Culture in the Ancient Mediterranean: Greece, Rome, and the Near East

From March 12 to March 23, 2018 Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, in cooperation with Venice International University, will offer an advanced seminar on “Literature and Culture in the Ancient Mediterranean: Greece, Rome and the Near East”.

The Program

The program is conceived as a two year commitment over two successive years (2018 and 2019). The first session (March 12-23, 2018) will consist of lectures by scholars with a seminar approach on the origins and development of literary genres and literacy in Ancient Greece, Rome and the Near East. Some of the lectures will run simultaneously and will be devoted respectively to the interpretation of specific classical and near Eastern texts, with more focus on textual analysis. An evening lecture by an invited speaker special is also under consideration.

The lectures will alternate with a series of site visits, for example, to the Marciana Library, the Library of San Lazzaro degli Armeni, and the Basilica of San Marco.

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Tue, 11/21/2017 - 12:35pm by Erik Shell.

CLASSICAL ASSOCIATION OF THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST (CAPN)
ANNUAL MEETING, MARCH 9-10, 2018
CALL FOR PAPERS

The 48th Annual Meeting of the Classical Association of the Pacific Northwest (CAPN) will take place at the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma, WA, on March 9-10, 2018. The keynote speaker will be Professor Joy Connolly, Provost of the Graduate Center, CUNY.

Call for Papers: We invite papers on any aspect of the ancient Mediterranean world, including Greece, Rome, Egypt, and the Ancient Near East. We especially seek those that are likely to be of broad interest and seek to make connections among different elements of the ancient world. Such connections may cross traditional disciplinary boundaries (such as archaeology, drama, history, literature, and philosophy) or geographical boundaries (e.g., looking at intersections between Greek society and Roman society) or even temporal boundaries (including receptions of Mediterranean antiquity in later places and times). We also welcome pedagogical papers, especially those that address the instruction of Latin and Greek at the primary, secondary, and university levels. Teachers and students of Classics at any level of instruction (K-12, college, or university) are encouraged to submit abstracts.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 11/21/2017 - 12:00pm by Erik Shell.
30th International Conference of Philosophy
"POLIS, COSMOPOLIS AND GLOBALISATION"
July 20-26, 2018
Samos, Greece

Call for Abstracts

This conference will bring together philosophers, classicists, researchers and scholars from all areas whose work concerns important issues involving various aspects of globalization, the notion of globalization itself and/or Greek philosophy. The conference aims at providing a platform for in-depth analysis and discussion of the above mentioned themes.

We welcome submissions from a wide range of disciplines, including economy, ontology, metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, politic, as well as other relevant disciplines and fields. Each paper session will have 20 minutes for presentation followed by Q/A session.

Papers presented at the conference will be eligible for inclusion in a proceedings Volume. We are looking to publish works that explore ideas, concepts, theories and their implications across multiple disciplines and professions that grapple with the relevant problems of our age.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 11/21/2017 - 10:39am by Erik Shell.

Mark Masterson, Senior Lecturer of Classics at Victoria University of Wellington (New Zealand) and member of the SCS for over 20 years, has been awarded a grant $476,000 from the Marsden Fund administered by Royal Society for his research project, "Revealing Desire between Men in the Byzantine Empire". He will be holder of this grant for three years starting in 2018.  Here is a link to the awards the Royal Society made this year:

https://royalsociety.org.nz/what-we-do/funds-and-opportunities/marsden/awarded-grants/marsden-awards-2017/

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View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Tue, 11/21/2017 - 8:39am by Erik Shell.

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