Call for Student Nominations: Emory Summer Seminar in Material Culture

The Use of Art and Material Culture in Scholarship and Teaching:
Greek and Roman Art: an Introduction
A Seminar in Material Culture for Graduate Students in Classics and Ancient History
Directed by Dr Jasper Gaunt, Curator of Greek and Roman Art, Michael C. Carlos Museum,
Emory University
22 May – 30 June 2017
Emory University, Atlanta GA
Supported by generous grants from the Samuel H. Kress and Henry Luce Foundations, and Emory University
 
The Society for Classical Studies (SCS) invites doctoral programs in Classics or Ancient History to nominate a student to participate in a 6-week seminar that will introduce ten graduate students to the use of material culture in their scholarship and teaching. The aim of this seminar is to familiarize students with archaeological material that goes hand in hand with the historical and literary records, and how to incorporate such evidence into historical or philological research. This seminar will be the second of three with the same purpose but with different foci and at different institutions. The first took place at the J. Paul Getty Museum in 2016; the third will be held in 2018. Background. Despite new awareness of the scope of material evidence, and the ready availability of excellent images, all too often literary scholars treat images as decoration or illustration, while historians exploit the material record only gingerly. Probably more important than “literature” was the oral tradition, and the essential web of images that arose from it. Conversely, it has been wisely said of archaeology that it is a branch of ancient history.
 
This seminar offers students an opportunity to engage with the material record on a daily basis. Over the six weeks, every effort will be made to introduce the widest range of possibilities encountered in the archaeological record. Not only pottery and sculpture in bronze and marble will be considered, but also works in precious or exotic materials like ivory, gold, silver, amber, gems, glass, faience, and colored stones. Questions of facture and circulation will predominate: how these objects were made, by whom, for whom, why, and how to recognize them in the literary, historical and epigraphic record.
 
Resources and Faculty.
Participants will have access to the Museum’s collections of Egyptian, Nubian, Near Eastern, Greek, Etruscan and Roman antiquities, both those on view in the galleries and those in storage. The latter, which will be used daily for teaching, include notably rich holdings of fine pottery and gems. The Karen Mariea Madsen Parsons Conservation Laboratory, the Thalia N. Carlos Education Center and its staff are also participants, as are Emory faculty members. An extensive collection of plaster casts of ancient sculpture, and models of the sanctuaries at Delphi, Olympia and the Athenian Acropolis on long-term loan from the Metropolitan Museum of Art are sprinkled among several buildings on campus. Further resources include the two principal campus libraries, the Robert W. Woodruff together with the Stuart A. Rose Manuscripts and Rare Books Library; and The Pitts Theology Library. Besides resources at Emory, the course will include the participation of Prof. Patricia Butz, Savannah College of Art and Design, on treasuries and their inscriptions; Prof. Mark Abbe, University of Georgia at Athens, on polychromy and color on ancient sculpture; and Prof. Peter Bing, University of Toronto, on the new Posidippos papyrus and hellenistic gems.
 
The course is co-ordinated by Jasper Gaunt, Curator of Greek and Roman Art at the Michael C. Carlos Museum. He is the joint editor with A.J. Clark of Essays in Honor of Dietrich von Bothmer (Amsterdam 2002), and has published widely on Greek vase-painting (including a volume of the Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum: Great Britain 21: Harrow School, 2005), vessels in bronze and marble, metrical inscriptions on pottery, and reception studies.
 
Schedule.
The seminar is structured in broadly chronological terms. The importance of time allocated for students to absorb material in the galleries in their own ways cannot be overstated. Three two-hour classes are planned each week around an over-arching theme, outlined in the synopsis. Provision is also made each afternoon for further opportunities to handle original objects. Excursions to local artists’ workshops – such as glass-blowing, gold working and a bronze foundry – are planned on Friday afternoons, as is a day trip to see the Nashville Parthenon and its life-size reproduction of the chryselephantine cult statue.
 
Expectations of Students.
It is proposed that students will undertake small assignments on an on-going basis, intended primarily to foster familiarity with the world of objects. These will include informal mini-presentations on objects in the Carlos Museum’s collections, gallery talks, and some sketching. Over the course of the seminar, participants will work on a paper to be presented in the last week. The subject will be of the student’s choice, rising out of their research interests, but in conjunction with the course co-ordinator, who will allocate generous weekly time to meet with students individually.
 
Logistics and Funding.
Students selected for the seminar will be offered free accommodation at the Clairmont Campus of Emory University. A shuttle service operates between this campus and the main one where the seminar will be held. Both on campus and within walking distance of campus can be found a variety of shops, grocery stores and places to eat. Some public transportation, and taxi services like Uber, work well. In other words, the use of a car is not essential. The cost of car rental is greatly reduced if the airport is avoided. In addition, thanks to the generosity of the Samuel H. Kress and Henry Luce Foundations, the SCS will provide a stipend of up to $2,000 to cover the cost of travel to and from Atlanta, and modest out of pocket expenses. The SCS believes that these arrangements will offset many but by no means all of the costs of attendance at the seminar.
 
Nomination Process.
Each doctoral program may nominate only one student for the seminar. The focus of the student’s academic work should be classical languages, literatures, and/or history and not archaeology or other areas of material culture. Preference will be given to graduate students who are still taking coursework or in the early stages of writing their dissertation. Nominators should elicit from potential applicants a CV and a statement of the value that the student expects to derive from attending the seminar, choose one applicant to nominate, and forward the CV and statement to the SCS Executive Director (xd@classicalstudies.org), along with a brief endorsement. The student’s statement should be 500 to 700 words in length and should describe how the seminar would advance the applicant’s education and scholarly interests. The student him or herself should also email the Executive Director (xd@classicalstudies.org) with full name, mailing address, phone number.
A committee consisting of Dr Gaunt as chair and Professors Mary English (SCS Vice President for Education) and Donald Mastronarde (SCS VP for Publications and Research) will select participants from ten different academic institutions and a variety of countries of origin. Although many applicants from North America are expected, students from all countries are equally welcome. Reasonable fluency in English is the only requirement. Nominations by departments and emails from student nominees including their full contact information should be submitted electronically to xd@classicalstudies.org no later than 1 January 2017. The SCS will announce the decisions of the selection committee in early February 2017. Questions about the seminar program may be directed to Dr Gaunt at jgaunt@emory.edu or by telephone at 404 727 1146.
 
Synopsis of Curriculum
 
Each week has an over-arching (chronological) theme that is explored in a two-hour class on Monday, Wednesday and Friday 9.30–11.30. On Mondays through Thursdays, an afternoon session 2.30–4:00 is offered during which original works of art that are relevant to the topics discussed during the week are handled, and questions of manufacture discussed. On Friday afternoons, excursions are planned to studios of artists working in different media.
 
Week One: Monday May 22 – Friday May 26: Homer between Bronze Age and Geometric Greece
The Heroon at Lefkandi - Nestor’s Cup from Pithekoussai – Early artistic responses to the Epic Cycle
 
Week Two: Monday May 29 – Friday June 2: Archaic Greece: The symposium: how to throw a party in archaic Greece
Myths on vases, myths in “literature” - History and heroes - Herodotus and the Vix krater
 
Week Three: Monday June 5 – Friday June 9: Classical Greece
Inscriptions and the Parthenon Inventories – Polychromy on Greek sculpture - Textiles
Guest speakers: Dr Patricia Butz, Savannah College of Art and Design (inscriptions); Dr Mark Abbe, University of Georgia at Athens (polychromy)
 
Week Four: Monday June 12 – Friday June 16: Alexander the Great and the Hellenistic World
Macedonian Tombs - The Posidippos Papyrus and gems – Ptolemaic Egypt
Guest speaker: Dr Peter Bing, University of Toronto (Posidippos)
 
Week Five: Monday June 19 – Friday June 23: The Roman World
Trimalchio’s dinner party - Portraiture - Glass
 
Week Six: Monday June 26 – Friday June 30: Pulling Things Together
Student reports
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(Photo: Michael C. Carlos Museum. Carlos Collection of Ancient Art, Atlanta, used with permission)

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The University of Edinburgh, in collaboration with the University of St Andrews and the University of Glasgow, will host the Seventh Annual Meeting of Postgraduates in the Reception of the Ancient World (AMPRAW) from 23-24 November 2017. This conference is generously supported by the School of History, Classics and Archaeology (University of Edinburgh), the School of Classics (University of St Andrews), the Scottish Graduate School for Arts and Humanities (SGSAH), the Society for the Promotion of Hellenic Studies (SPHS), the Classical Association (CA) and the Classical Association of Scotland (CAS).

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 06/28/2017 - 3:06pm by Erik Shell.

The Penn-Leiden Colloquia on Ancient Values were established as a biennial venue in which scholars could investigate the diverse aspects of Greek and Roman values. Each colloquium focuses on a single theme, which participants explore from various perspectives and disciplines. A collection of papers from the first colloquium, held at Leiden in 2000, was published in 2003 under the title ‘Andreia’— Manliness and Courage in Classical Antiquity. This was followed by Free Speech in Classical Antiquity, (2005), City, Countryside, and the Spatial Organization of Value in Classical Antiquity (2006), KAKOS: Badness and Anti-Values in Classical Antiquity (2008), Valuing Others in Classical Antiquity (2010), Aesthetic Value in Classical Antiquity (2012, all edd. Ralph Rosen and Ineke Sluiter), Valuing the Past in the Greco-Roman World (2014, edd. James Ker and Christoph Pieper), Valuing Landscapes in Classical Antiquity (edd. Jeremy McInerney and Ineke Sluiter), and Eris vs. Aemulatio: Competition in Classical Antiquity (in preparation, edd. Cynthia Damon and Christoph Pieper). All volumes have been published by Brill Publishers.

The topic of the tenth colloquium, to be held at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA, June 14-16, 2018, will be:

BETWEEN DUSK AND DAWN
Valuing Night in Classical Antiquity

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 06/28/2017 - 2:51pm by Erik Shell.
Dublin

The Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies (ICCS) has started a GoFundMe page in order to establish a scholarship in honor of Garrett Fagan, who passed away earlier this year.

"Garrett will always be remembered as an influential mentor, an inspiring teacher, a supportive colleague, a loving father, and a fierce friend, and for this reason, we've decided to establish a scholarship in Garrett's name for the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome."

You can visit the GoFundMe page to read the rest of the information about the proposed scholarship or to donate.

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(Photo: "Dublin, Ireland" by Giuseppe Milo, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Wed, 06/28/2017 - 2:24pm by Erik Shell.

Position Title: Managing Editor, Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library (DOML)

Supervisor: Director of Dumbarton Oaks

Department: Director’s Office

Hours: Full-time, 35 hours per week

Duties and Responsibilities

The Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library (DOML), published by Harvard University Press, launched in 2010 with the mission to offer major literary texts of medieval and Byzantine culture in literature, history, philosophy, and other realms of learning. The series has three aims: to make texts readily accessible in both content and price to a broad readership of English speakers, while also meeting the standards of experts; to equip non-specialist readers with the basic information needed to understand and appreciate the text; and to keep volumes in print for a long time. Each volume is bilingual, presenting a source text with an English translation on the facing page.  General readers, undergraduate and graduate students, and professional scholars from within and without medieval and Byzantine studies are the target audience. DOML began with a focus on three languages: Byzantine Greek, Medieval Latin, and Old English. The series now numbers 49 volumes, and is poised to incorporate additional vernacular languages with a new subseries, Medieval Iberia.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 06/28/2017 - 11:41am by Erik Shell.

Election materials are now online.  These materials include all candidate statements and the text of the new Working Conditions statement, which, if approved by the membership, will become part of the Society's Professional Ethics statement.  Voting will begin on August 1, 2017.

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 06/28/2017 - 10:42am by Helen Cullyer.

The SCS Placement Service has finished its 2016-2017 Placement season. Institutional reporting information on who was hired or the results of those searches - as required by our Placement Service Guidelines - can be found on this page.

If there are any results that have been finalized but do not appear on that page please have the hiring department contact the Placement Service coordinator Erik Shell at erik.shell@nyu.edu.

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 06/27/2017 - 10:07am by Erik Shell.
Compositing Bench

Traditional presses play a vital role in classical studies. Nevertheless, many scholars have written a book that may be better served by other means. For some, this book is a monograph, a collection of essays, or a revised edition that a publisher did not consider financially viable. For others, it is a much-needed commentary or translation. For still others, it is a collaborative research project created with engaged students. There will always be high-quality books that traditional publishers consider too costly to produce. Self-publishing and print-on-demand offer classicists a suitable alternative.

As the author of a self-published book in classical studies, I exercise almost complete control over my work. I have the power to sell my book at the price I choose; if I wish to change the price from $20 to $15, I can do so with a single click. If a reader notices a typo, I can make the correction at my kitchen table and guarantee that a revised paperback will be available within twenty-four hours. If I decide to rewrite several paragraphs, or update the book to reflect the most recent secondary literature, those changes will appear within a day. As author and self-publisher, I am not worried that a book to which I devoted several years of my life will go out of print. I alone make that decision, and it costs nothing to keep a book available. If I want to publish a second edition, that too is my call.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 06/26/2017 - 12:00am by Geoffrey Steadman.

What’s So Funny?

Discovering and Interpreting Humor in the Ancient World

20-21 April 2018

The Ohio State University

Columbus, Ohio 

Keynote Speakers:

•    Jack Sasson (Emeritus Professor, Vanderbilt University)

•    Ian Ruffell (Classics, University of Glasgow)

•    Amy Richlin (Classics, University of California at Los Angeles)

•    Christine Hayes (Religious Studies, Yale University)

Humor is a ubiquitous human phenomenon with a wide range of applications. Yet, what is deemed humorous is often culturally determined. This poses a significant challenge for scholars of ancient cultures. How do we identify what an ancient culture found funny? How did they use humor, and what drove their usage?

The purpose of this conference is to provide a forum for scholars across disciplines to discuss and debate humor and its functions in both textual and material sources across the ancient Mediterranean, from the early Near East through late antiquity. We invite papers that address the above questions, or any others, on the topic of humor in an ancient Mediterranean context.  

Possible topics include:

•       Theoretical models for identifying and understanding humor and comedy in ancient cultures

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 06/23/2017 - 7:48am by Erik Shell.

The inaugural conference of the Canadian Aristotle Society conference will be May 9, 10, and 11, 2018, at the Dominican University College, Ottawa, ON.  The theme of this conference is the following:  Aristotle: A Critic of Plato. Please submit a one-page abstract to Dr. Mark Nyvlt at mark.nyvlt@dominicanu.ca.  The deadline is January 31st, 2018.  Our first Keynote speaker will be Dr. Thomas De Koninck.

The purpose of the bilingual Canadian Aristotle Society is to establish a Centre wherein the themes of Aristotle, along with the Aristotelian tradition, are kept alive by way of either conferences or eventually publications.  The spirit of this Society will be speculative and classical in nature, though this does not exclude the analytical and continental traditions.  That the Faculty of Philosophy at the Dominican University will house this Society can only enrich its mission to sustain the Aristotelian spirit by both the Anglophone and Francophone communities in Canada and beyond.  Their intention is to make this Society into a dynamic Centre that will attract primarily Aristotelian scholars, but also scholars and interested parties from various other disciplines, such as the classics, theology, politics, art, etc.

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Bonjour,

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 06/21/2017 - 3:13pm by Erik Shell.

THEORIZING CONTACTS IN THE ROMAN EMPIRE
UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH, 8-9 December 2017

We live in a multicultural world, in which every community develops in constant interaction with others. A series of theoretical models have been developed to explain these contacts, which in recent years have been utilized to understand the ancient world. In the context of the Roman empire, these theories are typically used to examine the interactions of various indigenous populations with their rulers. These kinds of studies were once grouped under the heading “Romanization”, though the increased questioning of the term’s validity has given rise to a diverse range of alternatives. These are often drawn from modern theoretical backgrounds: multiculturalism and multilingualism are two recent concepts employed in this realm.

The aim of this conference is to assess the validity and scope of a variety of some of these models, with a particular focus on multilingualism and multiculturalism. By promoting and facilitating dialogue between disciplines, we shall aim to provide effective tools for different fields’ approaches in parallel (e.g. historical and linguistic). This has already been done very successfully in a few cases (e.g. ‘code-switching’), though greater interaction remains a desideratum. It is hoped that the participants will thereby open the discussion for a ‘theory of contact’ in the Roman world.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Wed, 06/21/2017 - 8:40am by Erik Shell.

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