CFP: 7th Biennial International Association for Presocratic Studies

International Association for Presocratic Studies

Seventh Biennial Conference: 15-19 July 2020
Belo Horizonte, Brazil: Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais

Chair of Organizing Committee: Miriam Peixoto

The International Association for Presocratic Studies announces its Seventh Biennial Conference. The meeting will take place at the Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil 15-19 June 2020 (http://www.ufmg.br). 

IAPS understands “Presocratics” to be the figures for whom either fragments of their work or relevant testimonia are collected in Hermann Diels’ Die Fragmente der Vorsokratiker(6th edn. 1951, edited by Walther Kranz). IAPS welcomes presentations on philosophical, philological, textual, doxographical, scientific, historical, literary and religious topics having to do with the Presocratics, on connections between Presocratic thought and other figures (e.g., the Sophists) and other areas of intellectual activity (e.g., mathematics, medicine or music), and on the reception of Presocratic thought in antiquity and later times. 

IAPS welcomes participation from scholars at all stages of their careers, from graduate students to senior figures in the field.

To receive further information about the conference, please send a message with the title “IAPS 7” to Prof. Miriam Peixoto:

presocraticstudies@gmail.com

Information about the venue can be found at our site:

http://www.presocraticstudies.org

Call for abstracts

Two-page proposals for papers, in the form of abstracts (maximum 300 words) should be sent in PDF format to: 

presocraticstudies@gmail.com

The title line of the message should be “IAPS 7 Proposal”

The first page of the proposal should be a cover page containing the following information:

Author’s name (as you would like it to appear in the program)

Author’s institution

Author’s title or position (e.g., Graduate Student, Independent Scholar, Associate Professor)

Author’s City/Country

Title of Paper

Author’s e-mail address

Modalities of session: 

(   ) Longer Plenary (30' for presentation; 15' for discussion)

(   ) Short Plenary (20' for presentation; 10' for discussion)             

(   ) Discussion session (45' for discussion)

The second page should contain the abstract and the title of paper, in any of these languages: English, French, Germany, Italian, Portuguese or Spanish.

To ensure anonymity in the refereeing process, do not put your name on this page.

Authors of proposals are asked to observe two deadlines:

(i)   Submission of abstracts: December 15, 2019.

(ii)  Submission of full copy of paper (after acceptance of proposal), May 15, 2020

Submitted abstracts will be reviewed by a program committee appointed by the Council of IAPS. The decision of the program committee will be communicated via e-mail to authors of abstracts not later than 31 January 2020. Authors whose proposals have been accepted will receive an official invitation to present a paper at the conference. 

• Papers may be written in English, French, German, Italian, Portuguese or Spanish. 

• For papers written in languages other than English, it is recommended that a full English version be prepared by the author in time for distribution to the audience at the conference. 

• If the paper contains untransliterated Greek, a Unicode font should be used. 

• Maximum length of the full copy of the paper is 3,000 words, exclusive of footnotes and bibliography.

Conference Fee

Payment of a fee will be required for those who attend the conference. The exact amount will be determined instead of defined.

Presentation of Papers

In accordance with the established practice of IAPS, there will be two kinds of sessions: plenary sessions and discussion sessions

Plenary sessionswill conform to the usual practice for conferences: authors will read their papers, and there will be a brief period for questions and answers:  

Shortest plenary session: 20 minutes to the reading of each paper and 10 minutes to discussion;

Longer plenary session: 30 minutes to the reading of each paper and 15 minutes to discussion.

The discussion sessions will take place in open areas at the conference center. At each session each of the presenters will sit in an assigned place, where his/her abstract has been posted, and discuss his/her paper with whoever comes to talk about it. The audience will be free to come and go as they wish, to discuss with as many or as few of the presenters as they wish, and to spend as much time as they wish with each presenter. The discussion sessions are intended for authors who prefer more extensive discussion of their work and/or for topics that would be most fruitfully discussed in such a setting. Proposals for collaborative presentations are welcome. Discussion sessions will be the duration of one or two hours.

At the time of submission of abstracts, authors will be given the opportunity to express their preference for presenting at either a plenary session or a discussion session. While taking such preference into account, the IAPS program committee will have the final say on assignment of the accepted presentation to either type of venue.

---

(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

Categories

Follow SCS News for information about the SCS and all things classical.

Use this field to search SCS News
Select a category from this list to limit the content on this page.

Read Mary Beard's review of two new books on Hannibal at The Times Literary Supplement.

View full article. | Posted in Book Reviews on Thu, 05/12/2011 - 1:09pm by Information Architect.

"Eric Dugdale, associate professor of classics at Gustavus Adolphus College, received the 2011 Faculty Scholarly Achievement Award on May 7 at the College’s Honors Day Convocation." Read more at the Gustavus Adolphus Blog.

View full article. | Posted in Member News on Wed, 05/11/2011 - 12:57am by .

The complete financial statement for fiscal year 2009 - 2010 is now available. Click here to download it as a pdf, or go to the Financial Statements page to view current and previous statements.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Sun, 05/08/2011 - 4:07pm by .

Audiences are invited to get intimate with the action in the second instalment of a fresh take on Camus' 'Caligula.'

"As many countries in the world struggle to depose tyrants, a timely play is taking to a Bangkok stage, transporting audiences to ancient Rome to unseat an emperor who has just elected his horse as prime minister. Fancy a stab?" Read more in The Bangkok Post …

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Sun, 05/08/2011 - 12:25am by Information Architect.

"'Heracles to Alexander the Great: Treasures from the Royal Capital of Macedon, a Hellenic Kingdom in the Age of Democracy' is as crowded with objects as its title is with ideas. The Ashmolean manages to cram in about 500 objects, discovered in the royal tombs and palaces of Aegae (modern-day Vergina in the north of Greece), most of which are being displayed for the very first time." Read more at The Wall Street Journal.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Fri, 05/06/2011 - 2:11am by Information Architect.

"The transformation of humans into monsters or animals is a standard feature of two great genres: classical Greek and Roman myth and American comic books. As those of us know who spent our childhoods and teenaged years greedily hoarding the latter, such transformations are only occasionally effected by a mere change of costume. Batman, for instance (introduced in 1939), is an ordinary Homo sapiens who simply dons his bat-like hood and cape when he wants to battle evildoers; his extraordinary powers are the fruit of disciplined intellectual and physical training. More often—and more excitingly—the metamorphoses occur at the genetic level. The Incredible Hulk, who debuted in 1962, is a hypertrophied Hercules-like giant, the Mr. Hyde aspect of an otherwise mild-mannered scientist named Bruce Banner, created during a laboratory accident involving gamma rays. Wolverine, one of the X-men, who sports lupine traits following his transformations, belongs to a despised race of “mutants” with remarkable powers. (The comic book series, now reincarnated as a hugely popular film franchise, debuted in 1963.)" Read more at The New York Review of Books.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Wed, 05/04/2011 - 12:25am by Information Architect.

"Jeffrey Henderson, the University’s William Goodwin Aurelio Professor of Greek Language and Literature and a world-renowned classics scholar, has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (AAAS)." Read the article at BU Today.

View full article. | Posted in Member News on Wed, 05/04/2011 - 12:21am by .

"Keeping the tradition of oral recitation alive in the age of technological storytelling, the University Classics Club hosted Homerathon, a 15-hour long recital of Homer’s The Odyssey." Read more…

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Mon, 05/02/2011 - 3:35am by Information Architect.

"The University of Florida College of Fine Arts and Digital Worlds Institute has been awarded $50,000 by the National Endowment for the Humanities Office of Digital Humanities." Read more…

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Mon, 05/02/2011 - 3:30am by Information Architect.

The phrase “Temenid dynasty” doesn’t exactly trip off the tongue. But this august lineage, which produced Philip II and Alexander the Great, was key to the development of the Western world. And in the Ashmolean’s dazzling display of archaeological finds the history of early Greece comes alive. Read more at The Telegraph.com…

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Mon, 05/02/2011 - 3:28am by Information Architect.

Pages

Latest Stories

Awards and Fellowships
SCS is pleased to announce that the 2021 Outreach Prize Winner is Mallory Mon
Awards and Fellowships
NEH Public Scholars Grant (December 15, 2021 Deadline)
Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings
(Re)Ordering the Gods. The Mythographic Web through Times

© 2020, Society for Classical Studies Privacy Policy