CFP: AAH 2020

Call for Papers: AAH 2020

Due December 2, 2019 to the Online Submission Form.

Please join us in Iowa City, Iowa for the 2020 AAH Annual Meeting, to be held April 23-25, 2020. The theme this year is “A Global Antiquity.” Registration ($95) includes a reception on Thursday evening as well as banquet to conclude the conference on Saturday night.

All of our sessions will be held on campus at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, IA. A block of rooms has been reserved for AAH participants, panel presiders, and attendees at The Graduate Hotel in Iowa City, a short walk from campus along the pedestrian mall. To make reservations call 319 337 4058. The AAH rate is $109 per night plus taxes and fees. This rate is guaranteed through Feb. 23, 2020. Plan to travel to Iowa City by car or fly into Cedar Rapids Airport (CID) if planning flights.

The deadline for the receipt of paper proposals for the AAH Annual Meeting on April 23-25, 2020 at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, IA is December 2, 2019. Please submit a 300-word abstract and short bibliography of 3-5 sources reflecting the state of the question to the conference submission form [HERE]

Papers are welcome on the following topics: 

Long Distance Trade in Antiquity 

Panel Presider: Jinyu Liu (DePauw University)

Ancient Food

Panel Presider: Jordan Rosenblum (UW-Madison)

Athenian Life and History

Panel Presider: Thomas C. Rose (Randolph-Macon College)

Alexander and his Generals on the Frontiers

Panel Presider: Rosemary Moore (University of Iowa)

A Global Late Antiquity

Panel Presider: Sarah Bond (University of Iowa)

Disease, Disaster, and Environmental Histories 

Panel Presider: Brenda Longfellow (University of Iowa)

Geographies of Conflict and Warfare

Panel Presider: Lee Brice (Western Illinois University)

New Documentation Panel: Epigraphy, Numismatics, and Papyri

Panel Presider: Georgia Tsouvala (Illinois State University)

Race, Ethnicity, and Outreach in Ancient History

Panel Presider: Nandini Pandey (UW-Madison)

Ancient History and Pedagogy

Panel Presider: Angela Ziskowski (Coe College)

Digital Humanities and Ancient History (DH Panel)

Panel Presider: Hannah Scates Kettler (Iowa State University)

Contact: Sarah Bond (sarah-bond@uiowa.edu) and Rosemary Moore (rosemary-moore@uiowa.edu) with any questions. Registration will open in December of 2019 and applicants will be notified by January 2020.

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(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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Please find a list of award and fellowship deadlines for this Fall:

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 09/09/2019 - 9:09am by Erik Shell.

ORBIS: The Stanford Geospatial Network Model of the Roman World (from now on: Orbis) is an interactive scholarly web application that provides a simulation model of travel and transport cost in the Roman Empire around 200 CE. Walter Scheidel and his team at Stanford University designed and launched the site in 2011–12, and the project saw a significant upgrade in 2014 (the old version is still available). The project is currently concluded.

The aim of Orbis is to allow investigation of the concrete conditions of travel in the ancient world, with a particular focus on the 3rd-century Roman route and transportation network. Orbis is a response to the long-standing scholarly debate about visual representations and study of “spatial practice” in the premodern world: traditional mapping approaches fail to convey the complexity of the variables involved in travel practices and provide a flat view of phenomena that are strongly connected with space and movement, such as trade, economic control, and imperialism. Orbis was conceived to respond to the specific question of how travel and transport constraints affected the expansion of the Roman Empire.

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 09/05/2019 - 10:02pm by Chiara Palladino.
The Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation is now accepting applications for the Career Enhancement Fellowship for Junior Faculty program and the Career Enhancement Adjunct Faculty Fellowship. The Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation administers these fellowships through a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, along with the Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellows Dissertation Grants, which opens in mid-September.
 
View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Thu, 09/05/2019 - 10:55am by Erik Shell.
"Empty Theatre (almost)"by Kevin Jaako, licensed under CC BY 2.0

The Braggart Soldier

The Shackouls Honors College at Mississippi State University presents a performance of the Braggart Soldier, a Roman comedy by Plautus.

The play, directed by Dr. Donna L. Clevinger, will be performed at 6:00 p.m. on Tuesday, September 24th and Wednesday, September 25th, 2019 in Griffis Hall Courtyard, Zacharias Village. Both performances will go up rain or shine and be free to the public.

This production is part of the Honors College Classical Week 2019. For additional information, call 662-325-2522.

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(Photo: "Empty Theatre (almost)" by Kevin Jaako, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in Performances on Thu, 09/05/2019 - 10:17am by Erik Shell.

Registration for the Joint AIA/SCS Annual Meeting is now open!

Reservations at the conference hotel are now open. You can reserve your room at the Marriott Marquis, Washington D.C. here. We have also booked an overflow hotel for the conference, located a 3 minute walk from the Marriott. You can reserve your room at the Renaissance Washington D.C., Downtown here.

To register for the meeting itself, click here.

For other important information, such as the preliminary program, see the "Essential Links" section on our Annual Meeting page here.

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View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 09/05/2019 - 9:50am by Erik Shell.

(Written by Donald Lateiner, acknowledging gratefully the help, research, and energy of the following people in compiling this SCS memorial: Natalie Wirshbo, Greg Bucher, Brad Cook, Kerri Hame, Nick Genovese, Robert Eisner, Page duBois, and June Allison. Rosaria Munson and Joe Patwell also offered observations. E. Marianne Gabel captured the photograph below on the left at Le Trou Normand during the 2016 SCS meetings in San Francisco. Natalie Wirshbo provided the photograph on the right)

ELIOT WIRSHBO. 24 January 1948--19 July 2019.

Parents: Nathan and Peggy Wirshbo.

Education: Hunter College BA 1968, University of Pennsylvania PhD 1976.

Positions: San Diego State University 1977-1979, Ohio State University 1979-82, lecturer (eventually tenured) at University of California San Diego, Department of Literature 1982-2019.

Dissertation: "Attitudes toward the past in Homer and Hesiod," 1976, directed by Martin Ostwald.

Publications: “On mistranslating Vergil Aen. 1.203,” CW 73.3 (1979) 177-178.

“Lesbia, a mock hypocorism?” CPh 75.1 (1980) 70-71.

“Can emotions be determined from words?” American Behavioral Scientist 33.3 (1990) 287-96.

"On Critically Looking into Snell's Homer," in Nomodeiktes: Greek Studies in Honor of Martin Ostwald, ed. R. Rosen and J. Farrell (Ann Arbor 1993) 467-77.

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Tue, 09/03/2019 - 9:32am by Erik Shell.

(Written and provided by Ward Briggs)

Lee, Mark Owen (1930-2019)

Fr. M. Owen Lee (as he preferred to be called) was a beloved fixture at the University of Toronto, where he spent nearly 30 years of his life, and a perceptive critic of Latin poetry. He is, however, best remembered by the sophisticated public as a longtime panelist on the Texaco Opera Quiz, where he answered questions with remarkable alacrity (he was often the first to raise his hand to answer) and with a seemingly fathomless depth of knowledge about opera.

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Tue, 09/03/2019 - 8:48am by Erik Shell.

AIA and SCS are pleased to announce the first-ever joint harassment policy for the AIA-SCS Annual Meeting. A joint AIA and SCS working group, including staff and officers of both organizations, developed the policy in response to events at the 2019 annual meeting and at other academic conferences, including the meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. The working group took into account feedback that AIA and SCS received via email, social media, and the annual meeting survey from members and attendees after the San Diego meeting. The group also considered policies and best practices in place at other scholarly societies. The policy has been reviewed by legal counsel representing AIA and SCS, and approved by the AIA Executive Committee and SCS Board of Directors.

The policy applies to all annual meeting attendees. Registrants will be asked on the registration form to check a box on that form indicating that they have read and will abide by the terms of the policy. We will also share the policy with our annual meeting hotels as part of ongoing collaborations designed to foster mutual respect among all involved in any capacity with the annual meeting.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 09/03/2019 - 8:39am by Erik Shell.

In March of 2019, Jordan Peele's Us was released in theaters. Much like his previous project, Get Out (2017), Us took the horror world by storm. Unlike Get Out, whose direct references to U.S. racism were the foundation of the plot, Peele left Us intentionally vague; allowing for a flurry of online theories to be born as to what his intended meaning may have been. To those with a knowledge of ancient philosophy, however, Us appeared to be a modern horror version of Plato's allegory of the cave.

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 08/29/2019 - 5:28pm by Justin Lorenzo Biggi.

As the new term approaches and gets underway, the SCS Blog is bringing you fresh perspectives and actionable ideas on teaching the languages, history, and material culture of the ancient Mediterranean.  Try something small — or something big — to kickstart your course!

τίς δ’ οὐχὶ χαίρει νηπίοις ἀθύρμασιν;

Who does not find delight in childish amusements?

Euripides, Auge fr. 272 TrGF

Anyone who has taught an introductory language class is familiar with the age-old challenge of keeping students active and engaged, especially when these courses tend to meet four to five times a week in the morning. This challenge becomes particularly acute for morphology-heavy beginning courses in ancient Greek and Latin, where “drilling” declensions and conjugations has long been a staple. In short: I don’t think I’m saying anything controversial in suggesting that it is easy for drudgery to reign in our beginning language courses.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 08/26/2019 - 7:06am by Amy Lather.

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