CFP: AAH 2020

Call for Papers: AAH 2020

Due December 2, 2019 to the Online Submission Form.

Please join us in Iowa City, Iowa for the 2020 AAH Annual Meeting, to be held April 23-25, 2020. The theme this year is “A Global Antiquity.” Registration ($95) includes a reception on Thursday evening as well as banquet to conclude the conference on Saturday night.

All of our sessions will be held on campus at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, IA. A block of rooms has been reserved for AAH participants, panel presiders, and attendees at The Graduate Hotel in Iowa City, a short walk from campus along the pedestrian mall. To make reservations call 319 337 4058. The AAH rate is $109 per night plus taxes and fees. This rate is guaranteed through Feb. 23, 2020. Plan to travel to Iowa City by car or fly into Cedar Rapids Airport (CID) if planning flights.

The deadline for the receipt of paper proposals for the AAH Annual Meeting on April 23-25, 2020 at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, IA is December 2, 2019. Please submit a 300-word abstract and short bibliography of 3-5 sources reflecting the state of the question to the conference submission form [HERE]

Papers are welcome on the following topics: 

Long Distance Trade in Antiquity 

Panel Presider: Jinyu Liu (DePauw University)

Ancient Food

Panel Presider: Jordan Rosenblum (UW-Madison)

Athenian Life and History

Panel Presider: Thomas C. Rose (Randolph-Macon College)

Alexander and his Generals on the Frontiers

Panel Presider: Rosemary Moore (University of Iowa)

A Global Late Antiquity

Panel Presider: Sarah Bond (University of Iowa)

Disease, Disaster, and Environmental Histories 

Panel Presider: Brenda Longfellow (University of Iowa)

Geographies of Conflict and Warfare

Panel Presider: Lee Brice (Western Illinois University)

New Documentation Panel: Epigraphy, Numismatics, and Papyri

Panel Presider: Georgia Tsouvala (Illinois State University)

Race, Ethnicity, and Outreach in Ancient History

Panel Presider: Nandini Pandey (UW-Madison)

Ancient History and Pedagogy

Panel Presider: Angela Ziskowski (Coe College)

Digital Humanities and Ancient History (DH Panel)

Panel Presider: Hannah Scates Kettler (Iowa State University)

Contact: Sarah Bond (sarah-bond@uiowa.edu) and Rosemary Moore (rosemary-moore@uiowa.edu) with any questions. Registration will open in December of 2019 and applicants will be notified by January 2020.

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(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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"The Limits of Exactitude"

Università degli Studi di Bari “Aldo Moro”
19th-20th December 2019

Keynote speaker: Prof. Therese Fuhrer (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München)

Exactitude is the third of the Six Memos for the Next Millennium by Italo Calvino (Cambridge MA, 1988). According to Calvino ‘exactitude’ is a «well-defined and well-calculated plan for the work in question; an evocation of clear, incisive, memorable images [...]; a language as precise as possible both in the choice of words and in the expression of the subtleties of thought and imagination». The aim of Prolepsis’ 4th International Conference is to reflect on Calvino’s definition applying it to the Classical, Late-Antique and Medieval Worlds. This year the conference will be particularly keen on – but not limited to – the following topics:

- Accuratio vel ambiguitas in speech, argumentation and narration.

- Ambiguous, inaccurate and disconcerting communication from the author, and potential reader response.

- Metrical and musical exactitude and its limits.

- Exactitude in treatises (scientific, rhetorical, grammatical).

- Quoting, misquoting and misplacing.

- Accurate and inaccurate titles, and their transmission.

- Limits in the material evidence (manuscripts, papyri, inscriptions, formation of corpora, mise en page, stichometry).

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 05/01/2019 - 1:39pm by Erik Shell.

Destructions, Survival, and Recovery in Ancient Greece

May 16-18 American School of Classical Studies at Athens

Organizers: Sylvian Fachard and Edward M. Harris

From the Trojan War to the sack of Rome by Alaric, from the fall of Constantinople to the bombing of European cities in World War II and now the devastation of Syrian towns lmed by drones, the destruction of cities and the slaughter of civilian populations are among the most dramatic events in world history.

Sources documenting destruction and slaughter in the Greek World are plentiful. The fear of being attacked, ruined or annihilated was so real that almost all poleis increasingly built city-walls to protect their populations and economic assets. In spite of the deterrent potential of forti cations and their real force, however, the ancient historians report that ancient Greek cities continued to be besieged, stormed, “looted,” “destroyed,” “annihilated” and “razed to the ground.” For instance, Herodotus (6.101.3) states that the Persians burned down the sanctuaries of Eretria in 490 BC and took away all its citizens as slaves. According to Livy (45.34.1-6) in 167 BC, the Romans destroyed 70 towns and enslaved 150,000 people in Epeiros, an act of destruction with few parallels in the ancient world.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Wed, 05/01/2019 - 12:01pm by Erik Shell.

(From the Cornell Chronicle)

Classics scholar David Mankin, beloved by Cornell students for his inspiring and idiosyncratic teaching style, compassionate mentorship and the signature black sunglasses he wore to class, died April 24 after a brief illness. He was 61.

Mankin, associate professor emeritus of classics, was the longtime instructor of Greek Mythology, a perennially oversubscribed course with an enthusiastic following. Many students described it as one of the most memorable and meaningful courses of their Cornell careers.

He was a scholar of Latin prose and poetry, with publications including commentaries on the “Epodes of Horace” (Cambridge University Press, 1995) and on the concluding book of Cicero’s “On the Orator” (Cambridge University Press, 2011).

“Dave Mankin’s knowledge of Latin authors and scholarship was superb, and he was strongly committed to undergraduate teaching; students took his classes in droves, and recommended them to their friends,” said Hunter R. Rawlings III, Cornell president emeritus and professor emeritus of classics. “In this era of declining enrollments in humanities courses, Dave Mankin countered the trend with remarkable success.”

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Tue, 04/30/2019 - 3:11pm by Erik Shell.

"The Landscape of Rome's Literature"
Seminar at the annual conference of the Association of Literary, Scholars, Critics, and Writers (ALSCW) 
Oct. 3-6, 2019 

The College of the Holy Cross, Worcester, MA
http://alscw.org/events/annual-conference/alscw-2019-conference/

This call for papers is for the seminar "The Landscape of Rome's Literature," one of many seminars that will occur during the ALSCW 2019 annual conference.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 04/30/2019 - 10:25am by Erik Shell.
"The Roman Republic in the Long Fourth Century"
May 16–18, 2019
Princeton University
111 East Pyne
Princeton, New Jersey (USA)
 
 

"The Roman Republic in the Long Fourth Century" investigates the transformation of the Roman Republic from the sack of Rome in 387 BCE to the war against Carthage in 264 BCE. As has long been recognized, this crucial moment saw the formation of the Republican state's political structures. Less acknowledged is that this political transformation accompanied radical changes in Rome’s society and economy, as well as in the very character of its cultural production. The aim of this conference is to offer a timely reassessment of state formation in this period and to relate this dynamic process to a wider context of change. The result will be a more holistic view, highlighting the period’s significance for our understanding of the Roman Republican history and providing a basis for future study.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Tue, 04/30/2019 - 9:52am by Erik Shell.
Lived Ancient Religion in North Africa
 
University Carlos III of Madrid
19-21 February 2020
 
Organised by
Valentino Gasparini & María Fernández Portaencasa
(Universidad Carlos III de Madrid)

Call For Papers (ENGLISH)

The LARNA project (Lived Ancient Religion in North Africa), based at the Institute of Historiography ‘Julio Caro Baroja’ (University Carlos III of Madrid) and funded the Autonomous Community of Madrid, invites researchers of ancient history, history of religion, archaeology, anthropology, classical studies, and further related fields to discuss the topic of Lived Ancient Religion in North Africa.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 04/29/2019 - 2:51pm by Erik Shell.

Multi-Society Statement on Proposed Cuts at the University of Tulsa

The undersigned associations urge the University of Tulsa to reconsider and rescind its recent recommendations calling for the elimination of undergraduate majors in philosophy, religion, theater, musical theater, music, languages, law, and of several graduate and doctoral programs, including those in anthropology, fine arts, history, and women’s and gender studies and to eliminate undergraduate minors in ancient languages and classical studies.

View full article. | Posted in Public Statements on Mon, 04/29/2019 - 9:09am by Erik Shell.

The new Classics Everywhere initiative, recently launched by the SCS, supports projects that seek to introduce and engage communities all over the US with the worlds of Greek and Roman antiquity in new and meaningful ways. During the first round of applications, the SCS funded 13 projects, ranging from performances and a cinema series to educational programs and inter-institutional collaborations. In this blog post, we aim to highlight three programs in which Classicists are sharing the joy of studying Greece and Rome with their communities..

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 04/25/2019 - 9:12pm by Mallory Monaco Caterine.
We would like to alert classicists to a recently-identified website (classicalbulletin.org) that presents itself as that of The Classical Bulletin (a now-defunct periodical) and offers open-access publication for a fee. The site fraudulently uses logos and trademarks, and the names of institutions and individuals, including the names of alleged editors.  Institutions named include The Canadian Classical Bulletin, two Xavier Universities, the Institute of Classical Studies in London, and Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers. None of the institutions or persons mentioned have any connection to the website.  Thanks to @rogueclassicist for uncovering the details.
 
The official site of the Canadian Classical Bulletin is: http://www.cac-scec.website/canadian-classical-bulletin-ccb/
 
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View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 04/25/2019 - 12:38pm by Erik Shell.

12th Annnual West Coast Plato Workshop

San Diego State University, 24-26 May

Friday (May 24)

3-4:30pm: Drinks and Refreshments

5-6:30pm: Keynote Public Lecture: Deborah Modrak (University of Rochester)

7-9pm: Dinner for Speakers, Commentators, and Chairs


Saturday (May 25)

9-9:30am: Coffee and Refreshments

9:30-10:45: Invited Speaker: Adam Beresford (University of Massachusetts at Boston)

Commentator: Jan Szaif (University of California at Davis)

11-12:10pm: Oksana Maksymchuk (University of Arkansas): An Anthropological Defense of the Measure Doctrine in the Protagoras

Commentator: Grant Dowling (Stanford University)

12:15-1:30pm: Lunch and Business Meeting

1:45-2:55: Marta Jimenez (Emory University): Protagoras and Socrates on Courage and Knowledge

Commentator: Ryan Drake (Fairfield University)

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 04/22/2019 - 9:35am by Erik Shell.

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