CFP: Anchoring Technology in Greco-Roman Antiquity

ANCHORING TECHNOLOGY IN GRECO-ROMAN ANTIQUITY

An interdisciplinary conference
Soeterbeeck (Radboud University), 10-13 December 2020

‘Anchoring Innovation’ is a Dutch research program in Classics that studies how people deal with ‘the new’ (http://www.ru.nl/oikos/anchoring-innovation/). We want to understand the multifarious ways in which relevant social groups connect what they perceive as new to what they feel is already familiar (‘anchoring’). In this conference, our focus will be on technological innovations in classical antiquity, and the ways in which these became acceptable, were adopted, and spread – or died an unceremonious death.

Technology is here understood in the widest sense of the word: it includes building materials and techniques, technical procedures and products, but also information technologies such as writing and calculating, coinage, medicine and military technology. Greco-Roman antiquity offers an ideal testing ground for understanding technological change in a complex, yet non-modern society: it is richly documented (both in the written record and in material remains), and the ‘sources’ are complex but also well-disclosed, which enables us to tackle complex research questions.

Our conference on ‘anchoring technology in Greco-Roman Antiquity’ will bring together students of the ancient societies of Greece and Rome and specialists in the various disciplines that address the spread and adoption of technological innovation in the modern world: economists, sociologists, anthropologists, marketing specialists, psychologists, and philosophers studying the implications of technological innovation. It is the express aim of the conference to facilitate a mutually beneficial dialogue between all these disciplines. On the one hand, we will explore how insights and results from the social sciences and ‘technology and society’ studies may be made productive for the study of an early historical period. On the other hand, we will explore how the data and methodologies that are specific to classical studies may make contributions to the social sciences, both conceptually and in terms of a diversification of empirical data and research strategies.

We invite abstracts for papers of 30 minutes from classicists, ancient historians, ancient philosophers and archaeologists of the Greco-Roman world. We welcome papers dealing with methodological and conceptual issues as well as papers presenting specific case studies. A team of social scientists, such as described above, will be invited to provide introductions on the state of the art in their respective disciplines and to respond to the classics papers. The conference is organized by Prof. André Lardinois and Dr. Stephan Mols, both of Radboud University, Nijmegen. They are supported by an advisory board, consisting of Prof. Wiebe Bijker (Maastricht), Dr. Miko Flohr (Leiden), Prof. Ineke Sluiter (Leiden), Prof. Liba Taub (Cambridge) and Prof. Teun Tieleman (Utrecht).

Those interested in presenting a paper are requested to submit an abstract of c. 300-500 words with a select bibliography, as an email attachment (Word or PDF)  to the coordinator of the Anchoring Innovation project, Aniek van den Eersten (anchoring@let.ru.nl) no later than 31 January 2020. Further information about the conference can be obtained from the two organizers, André Lardinois (a.lardinois@let.ru.nl) and Stephan Mols (s.mols@let.ru.nl). Selected papers will be considered for publication.

‘Anchoring Innovation’ is supported by a 2017 Gravitation Grant (Ministry of Education and the Dutch Research Council NWO); please see our website for further information and bibliographical references.

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(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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Our first interview in the Women in Classics series is with Sarah B. Pomeroy, Distinguished Professor of Classics and History, Emerita, at Hunter College and the Graduate School of the City University of New York. She was born in New York City and earned her B.A. from Barnard College in 1957. She received her M.A. in 1959 and her Ph.D. in 1961, both from Columbia University. Pomeroy has been recognized as a leading authority on ancient Greek and Roman women since her book Goddesses, Whores, Wives, and Slaves: Women in Classical Antiquity was first published in 1975. Her other publications include Xenophon, Oeconomicus: A Social and Historical Commentary (1994), Families in Classical and Hellenistic Greece: Representations and Realities (1998), Spartan Women (2002), and, with Stanley M.

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View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 12/05/2019 - 11:42pm by .

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View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 12/04/2019 - 10:19am by Erik Shell.

(Text provided by Tony Woodman, Basil L. Gildersleeve Professor of Classics Emertius at the University of Virginia, and Sara Myers, Professor and Chair of Classics, UVA)

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Many thanks to our Local Arrangements Committee for creating a fantastic guide to the DC area for our January 2020 meeting. The guide features plenty of family-friendly activities and also includes walking tours of classical DC. 

Read and download the Local Arrangements Guide for 2020.

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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Precollegiate Teaching Award

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View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Sat, 11/30/2019 - 7:08am by Helen Cullyer.

The deadline for the Undergraduate Minority Scholarships is December 13.

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Sat, 11/30/2019 - 7:04am by Helen Cullyer.

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