CFP: Ancient Greek and Roman Painting and the Digital Humanities at Tufts University

Ancient Greek and Roman Painting and the Digital Humanities

6th-8th August, 2018 at Tufts University

It is widely known that ancient Greek painting was mostly passed down to us through textual sources. These texts of ancient Greek or Latin authors, mostly dated from the 1st to the 2nd centuries CE, such as Pliny the Elder, Pausanias or Philostratus, offer a valuable testimony which enables us to establish the (partial) history of ancient Greek painting since its beginnings. Of course, these texts do not teach us everything we would like to know about ancient painting, because in the absence of the paintings themselves it is very difficult to write a history of painting that is devoid of suppositions or educated guesses. Yet, archeology has provided and still provides us with valuable information, on the one hand in terms of iconography (in particular through vase painting, but also from wall paintings and floor mosaics) and on the other hand on the techniques used for the treatment of color, thanks to the recent discoveries of Macedonian burial painting. This material can be compared to the texts and confirm or invalidate what ancient authors tell us about painting: names of painters, techniques, title and subject of the works, location of these works, under which circumstances these works were commissioned etc. Much more than trying to reconstruct paintings that are lost forever, the texts, compared to the iconographic and archaeological material we possess, make it possible to place these paintings in their historical and cultural context. This is the challenge of the Digital Milliet: to go back, once again, through the Greek and Latin texts on painting assembled in early twentieth-century collections, following the example of the Recueil Milliet, published by Salomon Reinach in 1921, as well as to compare them with the most recent archaeological findings and historiographical research in order to offer a fresh approach and a new reading of these texts, often known only to specialists.

Creating a corpus of texts devoted to a particular subject is in itself not completely new; however, a corpus supported by digital technology is such indeed, offering an undeniable working flexibility, especially since it is possible to update the data often in a digital collection. The Digital Milliet is the result of two years of work and currently offers some fifty texts devoted to ancient painting, to which images and "keywords" have been added, allowing for the creation of thematic collections.

The conference we are proposing will have as its starting point the Digital Milliet seen as a working tool, and will connect Digital Humanities with Art History. Therefore, this conference has two parts, each of which has a distinct focal point. The first part will be devoted to methodology and digital tools, aiming to provide an overview of the means and methods of research in Ancient Art History. In other words, how do we make Art History in the digital era, when the abundance of data dominates? What tools and methods should we consider? What kind of applications should we envision for digital resources? What are the inputs from a database such as the Digital Milliet?

The second part will be devoted to questions raised by the creation of the Digital Millet, and more broadly to the place texts occupy in Ancient Art History when they are confronted with material sources: what do these texts teach us and what do they not teach us? This section will also be devoted to historiographical questions, and particularly to the choices made by Adolphe Reinach in the process of interpreting the texts (readings of the ancient text, notes, translations) in his original edition of the Recueil Milliet. Therefore, it will be necessary to put the Recueil Milliet in its own historical context in order to get a better understanding of it that goes beyond the mere re-representation of the texts that are gathered in this corpus.

Abstracts should be 350-500 words in length, including a short bibliography (1 page maximum). We welcome research papers on the below mentioned themes but not limited to:

- digital tools in Art History and/or Classical Studies

- methodologies in the digital era

- education, pedagogy

- a case study of a work, a text, or a group of texts.

- new archaeological data, iconographic interpretation, comparison with texts.

-new readings of texts, fresh understanding of their vocabulary in connection to archaeological data.

The deadline for proposals is Friday 16 February 2018. The proposed papers should be sent by e-mail to the following address: digmilconference@gmail.com. Decisions will be made in April 2018.

(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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Alan Cameron

Institute of Classical Studies (University of London)

24 March 2018 at 2.30pm
Room 349, Senate House

Everyone is invited to celebrate the life and work of Professor Alan Cameron FBA (1938-2017) with friends, former colleagues and family on 24th March in room 348 of Senate House from 14.30 until 18.00 with a reception following.

Alan Cameron read Classics at New College, Oxford and then went on to teach Latin at the University of Glasgow before coming to London in 1964, where he was first a Lecturer and then a Reader at Bedford College and then from 1972 as Professor of Latin at Kings. In 1977 he moved to Columbia University of New York where he was Anthon Professor of Latin Literature and Language until his retirement in 2008. His books included studies of Hellenistic poetry, of circus factions in Byzantium, of Greek mythography and the magisterial Last Pagans of Rome that appeared in 2011.

A number of friends and colleagues will offer reminiscences of Alan and appreciations of his work. Among the confirmed speakers are Arianna Gullo, Gavin Kelly, Oswyn Murray, John North, Peter Wiseman and members of his family.

The event is free and all are welcome.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Thu, 01/18/2018 - 11:12am by Erik Shell.

January 15, 2018

Dear Members,

Looking back on the recently concluded Annual Meeting, I’m of two minds. For those who took part, I think it was a big success. Newer-format events, like Career Networking and Ancient Maker Spaces, were really lively and well attended, especially by younger members. Georgia Nugent’s presidential panel on the PhD as a launching pad for careers other than college teaching was really inspiring. And the Program Committee’s special session on “Rhetoric: Then and Now” brought our professional responsibility to be political into the spotlight in a way that I feel was both fruitful and long overdue.

The success of these events is all the more impressive because every one of them underwent major changes at the last minute when key participants simply could not make it to Boston because of the weather. Amazingly few sessions were actually cancelled. But if you couldn’t get to Boston, it wasn’t a good convention for you. I’m very sorry for those whose travel plans were thwarted, and I’m extremely grateful to all those got there in spite of the extra effort, expense, and delay that it cost. Frankly, your success in doing so probably saved the convention from being a total disaster.

(Speaking of expense, Helen Cullyer and her staff are working with those who couldn’t get in to mitigate their financial exposure. Everyone affected has now received instructions on requesting refunds.)

View full article. | Posted in Presidential Letters on Mon, 01/15/2018 - 8:37am by Helen Cullyer.

ROMAN DAILY LIFE IN PETRONIUS AND POMPEII

an NEH Summer Seminar for Pre-Collegiate Teachers (July 16-August 3, 2018

In the summer of 2018 (July 16-August 3), there will be an NEH Summer Seminar for pre-collegiate teachers on the topic of Roman Daily Life. This seminar is an opportunity to read Petronius and some graffiti in Latin and look at Pompeian archaeology for various topics of Roman daily life. The Petronius reading forms a central core of the seminar, and thus an intermediate level of Latin proficiency (1 year of college level Latin) is required. The seminar will be held in St. Peter, Minnesota (1 hour from Minneapolis) on the campus of Gustavus Adolphus College. The NEH pays each person $2700 to participate, which will more than cover the living and food expenses (approximately $1500) – note that each participant is responsible for their own travel expenses. The seminar has been organized by Matthew Panciera (Gustavus Adolphus College) and will be co-taught by him, Beth Severy-Hoven (Macalester), Jeremy Hartnett (Wabash), and Rebecca Benefiel (Washington and Lee).

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Thu, 01/11/2018 - 9:36am by Erik Shell.

Inscribing Death: Memorial and the Transmission of Text in the Ancient World
Yale University, February 23, 2017

Cross-culturally, spaces of the dead have been productive places for considering the inherent difficulty of transmitting traditions and texts. This nexus between text, tradition, and death is seen across a range of genres including law, treaties, and wisdom sayings. Within these genres, the efficacious and correct reception of texts and traditions as lived by actual individuals is paramount. "Inscribing Death" brings scholars together to explore the dynamic connections between textual anxiety and anxiety about death in the ancient world, including ancient Mesopotamia and the Levant, Greco-Roman Egypt, and late antique Judaism and Christianity. It will also seek to integrate ongoing interdisciplinary work with ritual theory, sociolinguistic approaches to ancient textuality, linguistic anthropology, and, more broadly, the material turn in the study of the ancient world in order to further our understanding of ancient attitudes toward the nature of transmission and the reception of traditions and texts in the spaces of the dead.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Thu, 01/11/2018 - 9:34am by Erik Shell.

Sing, Muse: Literary, Theoretical, and Historical Approaches to Music in Classical Antiquity

Eleventh Annual Graduate Conference in Classics

Friday, April 13, 2018

The Graduate Center, City University of New York

Keynote Speaker: Timothy Power, Rutgers University

Musical Performance: “Old Songs”

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 01/11/2018 - 9:05am by Erik Shell.

3rd INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PHARMACY AND MEDICINE IN ANCIENT EGYPT

The organizing committee cordially invites you to attend the 3rd INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PHARMACY AND MEDICINE IN ANCIENT EGYPT, to be held in Barcelona (Spain) on 25 - 26 October 2018.

The program includes the following speaker’s notes:

Prof. Rosalie David:

“Epidemics and their aftermath in ancient Egypt”

Emeritus Professor of Egyptology at The University of Manchester (UK).

Prof. Salima Ikram:

"Images  and analyses: recent Advances in Mummy Studies”

Distinguished Professor of Egyptology at the American University in Cairo (Egypt) and Invited Professor at Yale University (USA)

Prof. Eva-Maria Geigl:

“An Egyptian cat tale told by ancient DNA?”

Co-director of the Epigenome and paleogenome lab of the Institut Jacques Monod, University Paris-Diderot (Paris 7)/CNRS in Paris (France).

*In recent studies, Prof. Geigl and her team have demonstrated that the Ancient Egyptians were first to domesticate the cats.

Prof. Sahar Saleem:

"Ancient Egyptian medicine and health in the eyes of modern science"

Professor of Radiology at Kasr Al-Ainy Faculty of Medicine of the Cairo University (Egypt). Leading member of Egyptian Mummy Project - Egypt.

Dr. Jesús Herrerín López:

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Thu, 01/11/2018 - 8:41am by Erik Shell.

Ex uno nihil fit nisi unum: Greek, Latin, Arabic, and Hebrew Perspectives. (Abstracts due Jan. 22 to Eric Perl <Eric.Perl@lmu.edu>)

Michael Chase <goya@vjf.cnrs.fr>

At the beginning of his Commentary on the Liber De Causis (lib. 1, tract. 1, cap. 16, p. 13, 69-71 Fauser), Albert the Great writes: “This proposition, that from what is one and simple, only what is one can result (ab uno simplici non est nisi unum) is written by Aristotle in a letter which is on the Principle of the Being of the Universe (qui est de principio universi esse), and it is taken up and explained by Al-Farabi, Avicenna and Averroes”.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 01/11/2018 - 8:37am by Erik Shell.

This is the first of several communications addressing the aftermath of the winter storm that coincided with the start of the Boston meeting.  Please be alert for communications later this week about registration refunds. However, this message concerns annual meeting travel stipends.

If you received a stipend and attended the meeting or expended your stipend trying to get to the meeting, then there is nothing that you need to do.  Thank you for attending or for trying to get to Boston under very difficult circumstances!

If you received a stipend and did not use the funds to travel (or attempt to travel) to Boston, you have two options:

(a) You may hold you stipend until next year and use it for the 2019 San Diego meeting. If you elect this option, you must inform the Executive Director (helen.cullyer@nyu.edu).  You will not be eligible for a new stipend for 2019 if you retain your funding. 

(b) If you do not anticipate attending in 2019, or do not want to hold onto the funds, please return the funding by check to the SCS office. Checks should be made payable to the Society for Classical Studies and sent to Society for Classical Studies, 20 Cooper Sq. 2nd Fl., New York, NY 10003

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View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 01/09/2018 - 8:07pm by Helen Cullyer.

Please see winter and spring deadlines for SCS awards and fellowships:

Nominations for graduate student participants in summer Material Culture seminar at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign: January 15, 2018

Coffin Fellowship, for secondary school teachers traveling abroad: February 28, 2018

Zeph Stewart Award, supporting teacher training: March 2, 2018

Pedagogy Award, open to K-12 teachers and college and university faculty: March 2, 2018

Ludwig Koenen Fellowship for summer training in papyrology: March 28, 2018

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View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Tue, 01/09/2018 - 10:40am by Helen Cullyer.
Poster for Arsonists
Arsonists are systematically torching the town!  First, they wheedle their way into your home and then burn it to the ground.  As the play opens, a mysterious wrestler from a recently incinerated circus arrives at Gottlieb Biedermann’s front door seeking some “kindness and humanity” - perhaps even a little "bread and wine" to go with it.   Will Biedermann let him in? Of course he does.  Will Biedermann then believe the wrestler and his charming companion when it becomes evident to him that they are, in fact, arsonists?  What will he do once he sees how far it has all gone?   
 
View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 01/04/2018 - 5:28am by Helen Cullyer.

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