CFP: Annual Meeting for Postgraduates in the Reception of the Ancient World (AMPRAW

AMPRAW is an annual conference that is designed to bring together early-career researchers in the field of classical reception studies, and will be held for the tenth year. It aims to contribute to the growth of an international network of PhDs working on classical reception(s), as well as to strengthen relationships between early career researchers and established academics.
AMPRAW 2021 will be held at Columbia University in the City of New York (USA) from Thursday, November 11 to Saturday, November 13, 2021, in collaboration with the Department of Classics at Columbia University, the Institute for Comparative Literature and Society (ICLS), the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, and Columbia University Libraries Journals.
Due to the unpredictability caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, we are not yet able to confirm that the conference will take place in person. We hope that this will be possible; however, we are also making plans to accommodate a hybrid or online-only event. We will keep you updated as the situation evolves. Please be aware that, if the conference will be in person, we are unable to guarantee travel reimbursements to speakers, but we might be able to offer support on a need basis.
 

Confirmed keynote speaker:
Dr. Patrice Rankine (University of Richmond, Virginia)
 

This year's theme will be Center & Periphery in the Classics: Theory, Practice and Turning Points. The liminal features of the US (and of New York City in particular) inspired us to focus on this topic. Reception Studies in Classics are still treated as “peripheral” in many places, including this country, in spite of their increasing importance. In particular, they have been sidelined both by those who advocate the study of Classics as an unquestionable discipline, and those who wish to do away with the classical heritage completely. Framing the discussion in terms of center and periphery has the effect of illuminating the ways in which this dichotomy has historically inhabited – and haunted – academia. Conversations about how the Classics contributed to create the myth of a pure and privileged Western culture against which all attempts at intervention have been delegitimized are becoming more and more frequent within North American universities. Hosting AMPRAW at Columbia will facilitate a most important and timely dialogue around how we define what gets treated as a center and why, and who is left out. Moreover, the concepts of center and periphery need not be understood strictly as geographical or sociopolitical ideas; central to the discussion about the discipline of Classics and its future is the question of its methodologies. Peripheral receptions would also encompass works realized through innovative methodological approaches, both at the research and at the pedagogical level. The theme we propose will open up some areas within the discipline as it is traditionally conceived of: in particular, it could call into question the primacy attributed to the Classical canon, allowing for voices generally disregarded to regain a central place within the scholarly world. Not least, Columbia is stimulated and inspired by its own location – New York City being a historical crossroad of cultures, it makes such a renegotiation even more compelling than elsewhere. The city would provide a perfect setting for this meeting, insofar as it showcases the attractiveness of the center, while also revealing how the periphery exists within and is in tension with it.
 

We invite papers of 20-25 minutes dealing with any aspect of Classical Reception(s). Possible topics might be related, but are not limited to, the following areas:

• Classics Inside and Outside the Canon; Classics Inside and Outside Academia
• Decolonizing the Classics
• Classics & Activism
• New Pedagogical Strategies in Classics
• Translation Studies
• Classics and Gender, Sexuality and Queer Studies
• Classics as Public Humanities
 

We encourage proposals in the fields of, but not limited to, archaeology, literary studies, linguistics, (art) history, media studies, religious studies, cultural studies, history of law and political science, dealing with all time periods. The conference will be held in English, for the sake of convenience and accessibility. We acknowledge that this choice is in itself political and problematic, as it betrays a certain history of cultural hegemony and power. We will also encourage our speakers to think explicitly about their own relationship with this issue.
Moreover, we are working with the Columbia University Libraries to create a digital publication containing the proceedings of the conference. We hope that this will make participating to AMPRAW an even more productive and exciting opportunity for graduate students and early researchers in the field.
 

If you would like to present a paper at AMPRAW 2021, please send an abstract of around 200 words to ampraw2021@gmail.com by June 15th 2021, together with a short biography stating your name, affiliation, and contact address. Please indicate in your submission whether you would like to apply for a travel reimbursement. Applicants will be selected and notified by the first week of July.

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The Ph.D./ M.A. Program in Classics at the Graduate Center, CUNY is pleased to announce our upcoming virtual conference, 'Honor and Shame in Classical Antiquity', to be held on Friday, October 23 from 9:30 AM- 7 PM (EST) via Zoom webinar. This conference includes three graduate student panels (Embodiment and Performance, Greek Poetics, and Rhetorical Deployment). Our keynote speaker is Professor Margaret Graver (Dartmouth College); her presentation will be "The Eyes of the Other: Honor and Epistemology in Plato and the Early Stoics." A full schedule and further information are available online at https://opencuny.org/classicsconference2020/

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Tue, 10/06/2020 - 1:51pm by Erik Shell.

CALL FOR CHAPTERS

Pseudo-Oppian’s Cynegetica ­­– On the Hunt for Ethics and Poetics

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 10/06/2020 - 8:41am by Erik Shell.

Netflix’s new Paralympic documentary, Rising Phoenix (written and directed by Ian Bonhôte and Peter Ettedgui), was released in August 2020. As with many Netflix docu-films, Phoenix uses interviews with various athletes and members of the Paralympic Committee to follow the history of the Paralympics. These interviews are intermixed with old footage from the sport events themselves as well as the the use of statues in the style of those granted to ancient Olympians and athletes. Focusing mainly on the games in Beijing, London, and Rio, Rising Phoenix tells the story not only of prominent athletes - Matt  Stutzman, Tatyana McFadden, Ellie Cole, Bebe Vio, Jonnie Peacock, Jean-Baptiste Alaize, Cui Zhe, Ryley Batt, and Ntando Mahlangu to name just a few - but also narrates the history of their disability along with their discovery of sport. In order to do so, Rising Phoenix draws on the imagery of classical statues in order to create a new perspective on disability in the modern world.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 10/05/2020 - 8:01am by .

10/4/2020

The SCS board of directors has endorsed a statement issued by the Middle East Studies Association on a proposed rule by DHS that would limit the duration of student visas. The proposed rule, if adopted, would mark the most sweeping change to student visa rules in decades. You can read the statement here:

https://mesana.org/advocacy/task-force-on-civil-and-human-rights/2020/09...

View full article. | Posted in Public Statements on Sun, 10/04/2020 - 8:52pm by Helen Cullyer.

Modern’ Women of the Past? Unearthing Gender and Antiquity

Online conference, March 2021.

Call for Papers

The AAIA, CCANESA, AWAWS, CCWM and the University of Sydney Departments of Archaeology and Classics & Ancient History warmly invite abstracts for our forthcoming conference on the reception of ancient women, to be held over 5-6 March 2021, ahead of International Women's Day, 8 March 2021.

Despite restrictions on their autonomy from the (mostly) patriarchal societies in which they lived, women of the past were astronomers, chemists, warriors, politicians, philosophers, and medical practitioners (to mention just a few examples). Women strove to understand the world around them, and through their observations and innovations, they demonstrated that gender provides no barrier to participating and excelling in a full range of human endeavours.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 10/02/2020 - 10:43am by Erik Shell.

LETRA Seminario di traduzione letteraria (LaborLETT, CeASUm)

https://r1.unitn.it/laborlet/letra/

International conference

Translations of Aristotle’s Poetics ever since the XVI Century and the Forging of European Poetics

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 09/28/2020 - 1:19pm by Erik Shell.

Resident Fellowship - Center for Ballet and the Arts

The Resident Fellowship is our core offering for scholars and artists of all disciplines to develop projects that expand the way we think about the history, practice, and performance of dance. Past fellows have come from wide-ranging disciplines such as history, design, philosophy, visual arts, and more. Fellows are not required to be experts in ballet or dance, but must have an interest in engaging with the art.

The fellowship provides space, a stipend, and the time to pursue rigorous work. Fellows also gain new colleagues and a broad community of scholars and artists, two communities that do not often meet.

Fellowship timing and duration depend on individual fellow needs and project scopes. Prior residencies have run between four and sixteen weeks. The residency must occur during NYU’s academic year (September 2021 – May 2022).

Application Materials

Applications will be open from September 15, 2020 at 9:00am EST – November 2, 2020 at 9:00am EST

Click here for the application questions as they will appear on the platform.

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Mon, 09/28/2020 - 1:17pm by Erik Shell.

The Classics Everywhere initiative, launched by the SCS in 2019, supports projects that seek to engage communities worldwide with the study of Greek and Roman antiquity in new and meaningful ways.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 09/28/2020 - 8:20am by .

Now and Then: (In)equity and Marginalization in Ancient Mediterranean Studies

March 12th and 13th, 2021 (via Zoom)

The First Biennial Bryn Mawr College SPEAC Conference for Undergraduate and Graduate Research

Deadline for submission: December 1st, 2020

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 09/24/2020 - 12:24pm by Erik Shell.

The gods and goddesses worshipped by ancient Greeks and Romans belonged to particular cultural, social, and political contexts. Your task is to imagine at least one new Olympian deity who exists in the context of the modern world. How would contemporary norms affect the god’s attributes and the ways they would be worshipped? Your entry could take the form of a myth in the style of Ovid’s Metamorphoses, a poem in the style of a Homeric Hymn, a portion of a play, or any number of other genres or formats.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 09/24/2020 - 12:23pm by Erik Shell.

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