CFP: CAAS 2020 Annual Meeting

The Classical Association of the Atlantic States
Call for Papers: 2020 Annual Meeting, October 8-10, 2020

Hotel DuPont, Wilmington, DE

We invite individual and group proposals on all aspects of the classical world and classical reception, and on new strategies and resources for improved teaching.  Especially welcome are presentations that aim at maximum audience participation and integrate the concerns of K-12 and college faculty, that consider ways of communicating about ancient Greece and Rome beyond our discipline and profession, and that reflect on the past, present, and future of classical studies in the CAAS region.

The 2020 Clack Lecture will be delivered by Dr. Jinyu Liu, Professor of Classical Studies at DePauw University and Principal Investigator of “Translating the Complete Corpus of Ovid’s Poetry into Chinese with Commentaries“, a multi-year project sponsored by a National Social Science Fund of China (2015-2020).  Dr. Liu’s lecture title is “From Rome to China: Translation, (Western) Classics, and Comparative Antiquity.”  She describes her topic as follows:  “In this lecture, I will foreground translation (i.e. the act itself) of Classical texts as inherently a comparative project as well as the foundational importance of translation to comparative studies. In a joint manifesto, Fritz-Heiner Mutschler and Walter Scheidel have emphasized the “disruptive” potential of comparative history as one of the major benefits of comparative studies [Fritz-Heiner Mutschler and Walter Scheidel, “The Benefits of Comparison: A Call for the Comparative Study of Ancient Civilizations,” Journal of Ancient Civilizations 32 (2017), 113]. In the same vein, I underscore translation as a mechanism to engineer, facilitate, and complicate comparative antiquity.”

We will offer an undergraduate research session of presentations developed from outstanding term papers, senior theses or other scholarly projects, to be organized in conjunction with Eta Sigma Phi, the national honor society for classical studies.

All submitters of proposals for the meeting must be current members of CAAS. Participants in the 2020 Annual Meeting must be members when they submit proposals and must renew their memberships for 2020-2021 (the membership year is September 1-August 31).  All submitters of proposals that are accepted by the Program Committee for presentation at the 2020 meeting are expected to attend and deliver their presentations.  They are required to send a full draft of their presentations to their presider(s) by the end of September.  Submitters of accepted proposals who are unable to attend should arrange to have their presentations delivered by another CAAS member.

All proposals must be submitted electronically here.

Panel and Workshop Proposals may be 1 ½ or 2 hours in length, depending on the number of speakers. Submissions must be uploaded as a single PDF (.pdf) or Word 97-2010 (.doc/docx) file of no more than 700 words and must include:

  • a description of the proposed panel or workshop and brief abstracts of the individual presentations. Each abstract of an individual presentation must be accompanied by a bibliography or a list of resources consulted of up to five items (not included in the word limit). The proposal must clearly indicate the thesis and original contribution made by the panel or workshop and situate this contribution in a larger scholarly context (see Writing an Abstract for Professional Presentation). The proposal must be anonymous. The names of the organizer and presenters must not appear anywhere in this file except when citing a publication by the organizer or presenters.Those abstracts which include the names and/or institutional affiliations of their organizers and presenters will not be considered.
  • title of the session and titles of each individual presentation.
  • specific audio-visual needs for the session. CAAS is able to supply only a screen and a digital light projector (those bringing MACs will need to bring their special adapter plug to connect to the projector).  DVDs can be played only from your laptop.  Be advised that sound played from a laptop without special speakers may not be audible in the room.

Deadline for panel and workshop proposals is March 9, 2020.

Individual Proposals must be no more than 15 minutes in length. Each author must not submit more than one abstract.  Submissions must be uploaded as a single PDF (.pdf) OR Word 97-2010 (.doc/docx) file of no more than 300 words and must include:

  • clearly indicated thesis and original contribution(s) made by your presentation, situating it in a larger scholarly context (see Writing an Abstract for Professional Presentation). Submissions must be accompanied by a bibliography or a list of resources consulted of up to five items (not included in the word limit). The proposal must be anonymous. The author’s name should not appear anywhere in this file except when citing a publication by the author. Those abstracts which include the names and/or institutional affiliations of their authors will not be considered.  
  • specific audio-visual needs for your presentation. CAAS is able to supply only a screen and a digital light projector (those bringing MACs will need to bring their special adapter plug to connect to the projector).  DVDs can be played only from your laptop.  Be advised that sound played from a laptop without special speakers may not be audible in the room.
  • If you are an undergraduate, please indicate this by selecting “undergraduate paper” as the submission type, so that undergraduate submissions can be read separately, and in relation to one another.

Deadline for individual proposals is March 9, 2020.

For further information, please contact CAAS Program Coordinator Maria S. Marsilio (marsilio@sju.edu). Please contact Webmaster Jennifer Ranck (jennifer.ranck@gmail.com) if you experience difficulties with the online forms.

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(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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“Causes and Causality in Aristotle and the Aristotelian Tradition”

22-24 June 2020
 

This Conference is intended to provide a formal occasion and central location for philosophers and scholars of the Midwest region (and elsewhere) to present and discuss their current work on Aristotle and his interpreters in ancient and medieval philosophy.

Presented by the Midwest Seminar in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy with the support of the Department of Philosophy at Marquette University

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 10/21/2019 - 9:26am by Erik Shell.

14th London Ancient Science Conference 2019

The 14th London Ancient Science conference will be held at the Institute of Classical Studies, Senate House, University of London from Monday, February 17th to Friday, February 21st  2020.

Abstracts of around 200 words should be sent to Prof. Andrew Gregory (andrew.gregory@ucl.ac.uk) by 10th November. Decisions by mid November.

Papers are welcomed from established academics, postdocs and postgraduate students. Papers are welcomed on science in any ancient culture treated historically, philosophically, sociologically or technically. Science is construed quite broadly and may include epistemology, metaphysics and ontology relating to the natural world.

Papers generally will be 20 minutes with 10 minutes for discussion though some papers may be invited to give longer presentations.

This year the keynote speaker will be Prof. Dan Graham

There will also be two panel sessions this year. On the Material Basis for Early Philosophy organised by Prof. Robert Hahn and Prof. William Wians, and on The Antikythera Mechanism organised by Dr. Tony Freeth. Paper proposals are also welcomed for these areas.

Paper proposals are welcomed for these sessions as well as any other ancient science topic.

There is a website for this conference at:

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 10/18/2019 - 12:36pm by Erik Shell.

Res Difficiles: A Conference On Challenges and Pathways for Addressing Inequity In the Ancient Greek and Roman World

Organizers:  Hannah Çulik-Baird (Boston University) and Joseph Romero (University of Mary Washington)

Date: May 15, 2020

Place: Campus of the University of Mary Washington (Fredericksburg, Virginia), HCC 136

One of the great benefits of the shift from a pedagogue-centered to a student-aware or student-centered classroom is that we listen more attentively to how our students experience the content of what we read.  A decided strength of Classical Studies is the simultaneous proximity and distance—temporally, geographically, ideologically—of the ancient Greek and Roman world.  That distance is felt more keenly when potentially difficult subjects (res difficiles) in our readings—domination, inequity, violence both sexual and otherwise—present themselves for inspection.  Often the underlying source of the dissonance or disconnect is the distance in our perceptions of social justice.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 10/18/2019 - 12:29pm by Erik Shell.

The 50th Annual Meeting of the Classical Association of the Pacific Northwest (CAPN) will take place at The University of Oregon in Eugene, OR, on March 20-21, 2020. The keynote speaker will be Andrew Stewart, Emeritus Professor in the Department of the History of Art (UC Berkeley). This keynote lecture will be open to the general public as well as to conference attendees.

Call for Papers: We invite papers on any aspect of the ancient Mediterranean world, including Greece, Rome, Egypt, and the Ancient Near East. We seek those that are likely to be of broad interest and to make connections among different elements of the ancient world. Such connections may cross traditional disciplinary boundaries (such as archaeology, drama, history, literature, and philosophy) or geographical boundaries (e.g., looking at intersections between Greek society and Roman society) or even temporal boundaries (including receptions of Mediterranean antiquity in later places and times). It should be noted, however, that papers on narrower topics are also invited. Furthermore, we welcome pedagogical papers, especially those that address the instruction of Latin and Greek at the primary, secondary, and university levels. Teachers and students of Classics at any level of instruction (K-12, college, or university) are encouraged to submit abstracts.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 10/18/2019 - 12:18pm by Erik Shell.

As part of its commitment to diversifying the graduate student body and the field more generally, the Department of Classics at the University of Virginia seeks to support students from groups that are underrepresented in our discipline and who have not yet received sufficient training and research experience to prepare them for admission to doctoral programs. The Graduate School of Arts & Sciences at the University of Virginia is accepting applications to join the first cohort of Bridge to the Doctorate Fellows for enrollment in Fall 2020. The Bridge Fellowship is a fully funded two-year program assisting gifted and hard-working students in Classics to acquire research and language skills needed to pursue a Ph.D. in Classics. The Fellowship is geared exclusively to assist the professional and personal development of the Fellow, and as such it comes without teaching responsibilities. Fellows will receive $24,000 per year in living support and full payment of their tuition, and fees, and single-person coverage in the University’s student health insurance plan for a period of two years.

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Fri, 10/18/2019 - 12:09pm by Erik Shell.

43rd ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY WORKSHOP

MARCH 6-7, 2020
UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN

KEYNOTE: MARISKA LEUNISSEN, UNC CHAPEL HILL

The Joint Program in Ancient Philosophy at the University of Texas is pleased to announce that the 43rd annual Ancient Philosophy Workshop will be held this year in Austin.  In keeping with workshop tradition, we invite proposals on any problem, figure, or issue in ancient Greek and Roman philosophy.  Workshop sessions will begin on Friday morning, March 6, and conclude Saturday evening, March 7.  Each paper will be allotted forty minutes for oral presentation in order to allow for both a prepared response and open discussion.

To propose a paper, send both a 1-page abstract of 300-500 words and a cover sheet with contact information to this box as two distinct attachments, preferably as PDFs. The cover sheet should contain contact information and enable its reader to identify your abstract. The abstract should contain no identifying information. The box will not receive emails, only attachments, so place all identifying information in the cover sheet.

Proposals are due no later than Friday, December 20, 2019.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 10/18/2019 - 11:56am by Erik Shell.

Romans across the city this week remembered the anniversary of the rastrellamento within the Jewish ghetto in Rome on October 16, 1943 carried out by 365 Nazi officers at the order of SS Captain Theodor Dannecker. Italians often refer to it as 'la spietata caccia agli ebrei' (“the ruthless hunting down of the Jews”). During the raid, 1,022 Jewish Romans were gathered and sent to the Collegio Militare in Palazzo Salviati in Trastevere, just a few hundred meters from Vatican city and the papal residence. Most of these Romans were sent to Auschwitz on sealed trains that left from Tiburtina station. Most would die in the gas chambers there. Only 15 men and 1 woman survived the camps and returned back to Italy alive.




Figure 1: Archival photo of the deportation of Jews from the city of Rome on October 16, 1943 near the Porticus Octaviae. (Photo in the Public Domain).

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 10/18/2019 - 6:34am by Sarah E. Bond.

ANCHORING TECHNOLOGY IN GRECO-ROMAN ANTIQUITY

An interdisciplinary conference
Soeterbeeck (Radboud University), 10-13 December 2020

‘Anchoring Innovation’ is a Dutch research program in Classics that studies how people deal with ‘the new’ (http://www.ru.nl/oikos/anchoring-innovation/). We want to understand the multifarious ways in which relevant social groups connect what they perceive as new to what they feel is already familiar (‘anchoring’). In this conference, our focus will be on technological innovations in classical antiquity, and the ways in which these became acceptable, were adopted, and spread – or died an unceremonious death.

Technology is here understood in the widest sense of the word: it includes building materials and techniques, technical procedures and products, but also information technologies such as writing and calculating, coinage, medicine and military technology. Greco-Roman antiquity offers an ideal testing ground for understanding technological change in a complex, yet non-modern society: it is richly documented (both in the written record and in material remains), and the ‘sources’ are complex but also well-disclosed, which enables us to tackle complex research questions.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 10/17/2019 - 8:31am by Erik Shell.

On October 13, 2019, the SCS Board of Directors approved the following letter addressed to the Board of Directors of the Paideia Institute for Humanistic Study, Inc.

"The Society for Classical Studies joins the American Classical League in expressing deep concern in response to recent public statements regarding the Paideia Institute. Some of those statements are authored by individuals who have been closely associated with Paideia in various capacities and who have now resigned from the Institute.  Some of the published allegations are more generally about the Institute’s cultural climate, while others concern specific incidents. All the allegations are serious.

Accordingly, the SCS board of directors has approved a temporary hiatus on new funding for Paideia programs, including but not limited to support via the SCS Minority Scholarships, Coffin Fellowships, and Classics Everywhere micro-grants.

View full article. | Posted in Public Statements on Mon, 10/14/2019 - 12:59pm by Helen Cullyer.

Years of restoration work on the Palatine Hill and in the Roman Forum which—together with the Colosseum—now make up the Parco Archeologico del Colosseo has been coming to fruition over the last few years. After decades of sporadic work, rusting scaffolding, and locked gates, a fabulous flurry of activity has yielded an ever greater number of visitable sites.

Many of these are accessible as part of the SUPER ticket, which provides access to the Palatine Hill and the Roman Forum (but not the Colosseum), and includes access to eight excellent “bonus” sites: Santa Maria Antiqua, Temple of Romulus, Palatine Museum, the Neronian Cryptoporticus, the Aula Isiaca and Loggia Mattei, the Houses of Augustus and Livia, and—most recently—the Domus Transitoria.

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 10/11/2019 - 12:13am by Agnes Crawford.

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