CFP: Cathartic History

Conference: Cathartic History

University of West Georgia, Carrollton, GA
February 25-27, 2021

The aim of this conference and the edited collection that will result is to propose Aristotelian catharsis as a new lens for historical inquiry. The project aims to do so, specifically, through the study of cathartic history as a phenomenon in the Greco-Roman Mediterranean and in the field of Classical history today. In the process, the project will serve as an example of the productive application of catharsis to the study of the past, and thus a model for other fields of historical research.

While the study of the past as a healing experience is not entirely new, no uniform vocabulary exists at this time for talking about cathartic history. Rather, scholars who have written to elicit an emotional response from their audiences about the past, or who have chosen to consider their own emotional response to the past, have largely done so in passing or in popularly oriented publications, rather than using that emotional response as a bona fide category of historical analysis in and of itself. And yet, the historian’s selection of topics of research, both in the ancient world and in the historical profession today, is often motivated by personal experiences, broadly defined. This project aims to show that thinking about the past as a cathartic experience whether for us as historians, and/or for the ancient historians we study, and/or for our modern audiences, provides a new bridge for a productive academic dialogue of the past with the present.

Proposals are invited for 20-minute papers that consider (but are not limited to) the following questions:

  • How might we apply the Aristotelian theory of catharsis to Greek and Roman historians?
  • In what ways might the lens of catharsis enrich our reading of narratives of trauma (whether personal or literary or national) in the ancient sources?
  • Are we pursuing catharsis in our own research whenever we focus on topics of personal relevance?
  • Is historical research a cathartic experience? Should it be?
  • In what ways could thinking about history through the lens of catharsis intersect with the increased interest in social justice within the field of Classics?

Please submit abstracts of 300-500 words by November 12, 2019 to Nadya Williams, nwilliam@westga.edu

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(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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44th ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY WORKSHOP

MARCH 5-6, 2021

 

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN

 

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 09/23/2020 - 10:36am by Erik Shell.

The William Sanders Scarborough Fellowships
Deadline: November 1, 2020

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Wed, 09/23/2020 - 10:29am by Erik Shell.

The following members were elected in the ballot held this Summer. They take office in January 2021, except for the two new members of the Nominating Committee who take office immediately.  Thank you to all SCS members who agreed to stand for election this year.

President-Elect

Matthew Santirocco

Vice President for Publications and Research  

Kathryn Gutzwiller
Vice President for Professional Matters

Ruth Scodel

Directors

Jinyu Liu

Dan-el Padilla Peralta

Professional Ethics Committee

Amy Pistone

Nominating Committee

Serena Connolly

Katherine Lu Hsu

Program Committee

Emily Baragwanath

Ayelet Haimson Lushkov  

Sarah Culpepper Stroup

Goodwin Committee

Richard Hunter

Amy Richlin

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 09/23/2020 - 8:49am by Erik Shell.

In last year’s introductory Greek class, I watched a student rejoice when asked to give a (partial) synopsis of the verb ‘λύω.’ While synopses are rarely met with enthusiastic responses, this student knew that the synopsis, if correctly produced, would make him stronger. My class was playing Olympus, a term-length board game played in one-hour instalments throughout the quarter, and he had just drawn the Agōgē card.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 09/21/2020 - 4:04pm by Joshua J. Hartman.
NEH Logo

August, 2020

Below is a list of the most recent NEH grantees and their Classically-themed projects. The NEH helps fund a number of SCS initiatives, and their support affects the field of Classics at a national and local level.

Grantees

  • Eleni Hasaki (University of Arizona) and Diane Harris Cline (George Washington University) - "Social Networks of Athenian Potters: Networks, Tradition and Innovation in Communities of Artists"
  • Rega Wood (Indiana University, Bloomington) - "Richard Rufus Project"
  • Matthew Panciera (Gustavus Adolphus College) - "Digital Ancient Rome"
  • Noah Heringman (University of Missouri, Columbia) - "Vetusta Monumenta: Ancient Monuments, a Digital Edition"
  • Alexander Jones (New York University) - "The ANcient Sciences in Cross-Cultural Perspective"
  • Rachel Kousser (CUNY Research Foundation, Graduate School and University Center) - "The Last Years of Alexander the Great (330-323 BCE)"
  • Michael Satlow (Brown University) - "Seeking the Gods: The Spiritual Landscape of Late Antiquity"
  • Pramit Chaudhuri (University of Texas, Austin) - "Computational Tools for Diachronic and Cross-cultural Study of Literature: Multilingual Stylometry and Phylogenetic Profiling"
  • Jessica Powers (San Antonio Museum of Art) - "Art, Nature, and Myth in Ancient Rome"

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View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Thu, 09/10/2020 - 8:57am by Erik Shell.

American Philosophical Society, RESEARCH PROGRAMS
Information and application instructions for all of the Society's programs can be accessed at our website, http://www.amphilsoc.org. Click on the "Grants" tab at the top of the homepage.

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Thu, 09/10/2020 - 8:48am by Erik Shell.

Preliminary CfP: Edited Volume on “Cicero in Greece, Greece in Cicero”

Submissions are invited for an edited volume on “Cicero in Greece, 
Greece in Cicero”.

In 2021 it will be 2100 years since Cicero’s trip to Greece in 79 BCE, 
which was a significant factor in moulding him as an orator, 
philosopher and politician. This provides the opportunity to put 
together new and unpublished material on Cicero’s presence in Greece 
literally, namely for the years he spent in nowadays Modern Greek 
territory, including his aforementioned travel in 79/78 BCE and the 
period of his exile in 58/57 BCE, and metaphorically, that is the 
reception of Cicero in Late Roman, Byzantine, Post-Byzantine, Early 
Modern, and Modern Greece through translations, studies, imitations, 
etc. It is also an opportunity to approach from a new point of view 
the presence of Greece in Cicero, namely how the Greek world, people, 
language, civilisation, history, philosophy, politics and political 
theory, religion, geography, etc. appear in his work.

Abstracts for proposed submissions are invited on any of the 
aforementioned topics. Diverse, interdisciplinary, multidisciplinary 
and other approaches to the material are welcome and encouraged. Early 
career researchers are also encouraged to apply.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 09/10/2020 - 8:46am by Erik Shell.

Call for Participants
Veteran Politics and Memory: A Global Perspective

Department of History, University of Warwick
16th and 17th April 2021

From the fields of Gettysburg to the beaches of Normandy, the participation and presence of former soldiers has been an integral part of the memorial culture of many conflicts. As survivors of war, veterans are often portrayed a group imbued with a unique knowledge whose experiences should not be forgotten. Yet while public commemorations have sought to establish consensus about the meaning of the past, veterans’ memories have also been a source of conflict and contestation, engaged in struggles over rights, recognition, and the authority to remember the past and speak for the future.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 09/10/2020 - 8:35am by Erik Shell.

Congratulations to the three winners of the 2020 Charles J. Goodwin Award of Merit. The award recognizes outstanding achievement in classical scholarship. You can read the full award citations by clicking on the names of the winners below:

Paul J. Kosmin

Kelly Shannon-Henderson

Steven D. Smith

Paul J. Kosmin, Time and its Adversaries in the Seleucid Empire (Harvard University Press, 2018)

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Wed, 09/09/2020 - 12:02pm by Helen Cullyer.

Unattainable wishes for the present or past may be entirely reasonable.

– Smyth’s Greek Grammar, “Wishes” §2156.5

Picture the heroine in the sand, wind-lashed and desperate, cursing the hero who left her behind. She’s Medea, she’s Ariadne, she’s Dido. Each of the three make a similar wish:

 

If only that ship had never reached my shores

If only that ship had never sailed

If only that ship had never even been built.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 09/07/2020 - 10:40am by Hilary Lehmann.

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