CFP: Fear of Space in the Ancient World

Call for Papers:

Horror vacui: Fear of Space in the Ancient World

Biennial Classics Graduate Student Conference

Conducted virtually via Zoom

New York University

November 5th, 2021

Keynote: Amy Russell (Brown University)

The study of the ancient world is, at its core, an exploration of void. Void implies possibility, but also provokes fear and anxiety. We too experience this void in our scholarship - not one of complete emptiness, but one which requires careful and creative inference to reconcile the state of ancient evidence. While Aristotle, famously, was the first to remark that “nature abhors empty space,” the specific phrase horror vacui was coined only in the 20th century by Italian art critic Mario Praz, in response to works characterized by an abundance of decoration and apparent rejection of empty space. But if horror vacui implies density, it also by contrast highlights the void with which artists, scientists, and scholars of ancient history must grapple. While visual density is often the focus of modern studies relating to horror vacui, we seek to recontextualize the term across physical, cultural, temporal, and political spheres.
 
The goal of this conference is to explore anxieties about voids and the efforts people make to fill them, both in antiquity and today. Historical and modern experiences of studying antiquity rely upon this practice. Horror vacui can be seen in the attempts made to fill the gaps in historical or biographical accounts; thus Statius, in composing his Achilleid, remarked: sed plura vacant, 1.4. It is there in the tendency to attribute apocryphal works to well-known authors to eschew the threat of anonymity. The encyclopedic vogue of late antiquity sought to cover every domain of knowledge so as to leave no gaps. Works of art such as the Ludovisi battle sarcophagus accomplish dynamism in part by leaving no empty space where the eye might rest. The settlement of Roman veterans and the establishment of provinces on land imagined as void illustrate the uses of ostensibly empty space in the service of political interests. A new examination of horror vacui in its multiple dimensions can serve as a framework for conceptualizing our own relationship to the discipline we inhabit, and the efforts we undertake to bridge gaps and fill voids.

Possible topics may include but are not limited to:
•  Literary, visual, and historical responses to real or perceived emptiness
•  Theoretical, scientific, and philosophical discussions of the problem of emptiness
•  Literature with the goal of producing a “comprehensive” or “universal” work, e.g. ancient dictionaries, encyclopedias, or catalogues
•  Art historical or architectural trends in favor of or in opposition to complexity, ornament, and elaboration
•  Urban topography and the problem of urban voids, the transformation of meaningful public space
•  Manuscript studies, including lesser-studied authors and/or spurious works successfully transmitted due to a perceived void in tradition
•  Responses to ecological, temporal, historical, and political forces which create an artificial void in social memory
•  Urbanization and imposed settlement of “empty” lands, or emptiness as an expression of power

We welcome papers from critical perspectives old and new, including those informed by anthropological, ecocritical, and postcolonial theories and invite submissions from graduate students specializing in Greco-Roman classics and related disciplines (history, religious studies, philosophy, art history, archaeology, Near Eastern studies, Jewish studies, et al.), especially those employing interdisciplinary approaches.

Anonymous abstracts of up to 300 words, with an optional bibliography, should be submitted to nyugradconference@gmail.com in .pdf format no later than October 1st, 2021. Please include your name, affiliation, and the title of your paper in the body text of your email. Notification of acceptance will be sent in early October. Papers should not exceed 20 minutes and will be delivered via Zoom. Any questions regarding the conference may be addressed to the co-organizers, Greta Gualdi and Meredith Millar, at the same email address.

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Title: Papyrus in Greek regarding tax issues (3rd ca. BC.)  Currently in the Metropolitan Mueum of Art. https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/251788 Source: Wikipedia Commons https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Papyrus_in_Greek_regarding_tax

(publishing on behalf of Thea Sommerschield, a Marie Curie fellow at Ca’ Foscari University of Venice and Fellow at Harvard’s CHS)

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Thu, 03/10/2022 - 11:48am by .

Res Difficiles: A Conference on Challenges and Pathways for Addressing Inequity in Classics 

When: May 20, 2022 , 9:00am - 4:00pm 

Where: Live-streamed via Zoom [Registration now open]

Classical Studies at Boston University and Classics, BU Center for the Humanities, Philosophy, & Religious Studies at the University of Mary Washington present Res Difficiles: A Conference On Challenges and Pathways for Addressing Inequity In Classics. [Res Difficiles 3: Difficult Conversations in Classics].

Dr. Kelly Nguyen (Stanford University) will deliver the keynote address.

The event will be live-streamed via Zoom, and will be live-captioned. Participants/viewers may live-tweet the event on the hashtag #ResDiff3.

You can find more information about the speakers and sessions here: https://resdifficiles.com/

You can register here

Any questions can be directed to the co-organizers: Hannah Čulík-Baird and Joseph Romero.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Tue, 03/08/2022 - 12:35pm by .

Dura-Europos: Past, Present, Future - Celebrating the Centennial of Excavations at Dura-Europos

Sponsored by: Yale University’s interdisciplinary ARCHAIA Program for the Study of Ancient and Premodern Cultures and Societies

Dates : March 31, 2022 - April 2, 2022

Where: Hybrid/Virtual [livestream]

Yale University’s interdisciplinary ARCHAIA program is pleased to share news of its upcoming hybrid conference: Dura-Europos: Past, Present, Future. This three-day event (March 31-April 2, 2022) is arranged to celebrate the centennial of excavations on-site at Dura-Europos (Syria). Papers and discussion will explore the town’s regional and long-distance ties in antiquity, 21st-century geopolitical entanglements, and avenues for future research. Registration is free, and online attendance is open to all. 

For information about the papers and presenters, and to register, please see: 

https://campuspress.yale.edu/duraeuropos2022/

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Tue, 03/08/2022 - 11:55am by .

CAAS ARC Workshop: Diversity Policies are for Everyone

When: Saturday, March 19, 2022 - 11:00AM EDT

Where: Virtual (via Zoom)

The Antiracism Committee (ARC) of The Classical Association of the Atlantic States (CAAS) is organizing another workshop on diversity policies. Through a series of case studies, this workshop will explore ways to create and improve on diversity policies so that they can be more helpful to BIPOC students and scholars. We’ll be meeting on Saturday, March 19, 2022 at 11am EDT via Zoom. This workshop is free and open to anyone who registers.

If you’d like to register, you can fill out this form:  https://forms.gle/C5KMYK7nB3FQRVXr8

If you have any questions about the workshop, please email David Wright: djwrig85@gmail.com. See also attached flyer and share widely! Hope to see you there!

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 03/07/2022 - 3:04pm by .

Call for Proposals: CAAS 2022 Annual Meeting

The Classical Association of the Atlantic States

Dates: October 6-8, 2022

Venue: HOTEL DU PONT, Wilmington, DE

Deadline for all proposals (individual papers, panels, workshops): (extended) Monday, March 28, 2022

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 03/07/2022 - 12:34pm by .

The Classics Program at Hunter College, City University of New York (CUNY), advertises its graduate programs in Latin education. These programs combine courses and mentoring in the vibrant environs of New York City. They aim to foster the ability to make Latin compelling to a diverse population of middle and high school students. Both programs lead to certification in New York State. Applications are accepted in both the Fall and the Spring. The deadline for applications to start in Fall 2022 is March 15th, 2022, but consideration may be made for later applications. 

  1. MA in Adolescent Education, Grades 7-12 – Latin

A 49 to 50-credit course sequence in Latin, Classics, and Education that prepares students to teach Latin in grades 7-12. This program is run jointly by the Classics Program in the School of Arts and Sciences and the School of Education.

View full article. | Posted in Degree and Certificate Programs on Fri, 03/04/2022 - 4:49pm by .

When you are standing at the edge of the Pontic steppe, where the Bug-Dnieper estuary melts into the Black Sea, there are three islands on the horizon. It can be difficult to see in the haze of late summer, which is when I was there last with two friends, Sam Holzman and Phil Katz.

Foremost is Berezan, once connected to the adjacent mainland. Long and flat-topped like a container ship, the largest of the handful of islands to rise from the Black Sea. It was settled by Ionians in the sixth century BCE, and has been all-but-continuously excavated since 1894.

A second island is artificial: across from the mainland town of Ochakiv lies the fortress isle of Pervomaisky. The Ottomans used the citadel at Ochakiv to control access to the river until it fell to John Paul Jones in service of the Empress Catherine in 1788. Pervomaisky was built up from a sandbar and fortified by Russia in the late nineteenth century. Both permanently blocked off the Dnieper as an invasion or slaving route to the forest steppe.

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 03/03/2022 - 12:00pm by .

International Conferences of Novelty in Classics

1st ICoNiC: Audience Response in Ancient Greek and Latin Literature: Concepts, Contexts, Conflicts - Multiple Approaches to Author-Audience Relationship

02-03 September 2022 (virtual via MS Teams)

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 02/22/2022 - 8:30am by .

Between 6pm GMT on 31 May 2022 and the following evening, 1 June 2022, the Herodotus Helpline will be hosting the Herodotus Marathon. This is a non-stop, multilingual reading of Herodotus’ Histories. We are calling it the Marathon because we anticipate that it will take a little over 26 hours. Non-stop. Different readers will read their sections of the Histories via zoom, but it will be broadcast live (and recorded for posterity) on youtube. Readers will read in their native languages (or in ancient Greek, if they prefer).

To reflect Herodotus’ huge reach, we are looking for readers from the widest possible range of backgrounds (and the widest possible range of native tongues). Readers will include: scholars and students of Herodotus, celebrities with an interest or background in antiquity, or members of the general public with an interest in the ancient world - all are welcome!

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 02/22/2022 - 8:04am by .

Interdisciplinary Humanities 

Fall/Winter 2022 issue: Myth and Art

Deadline for Submissions: March 31, 2022

Guest Editors: Edmund Cueva and Anna Tahinci

[Journal published by parent organization - HERA (Humanities Education and Research Association) at UTEP (University of Texas at El Paso)]

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 02/22/2022 - 7:41am by .

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