CFP: Fifth University of Florida Classics Graduate Symposium

Call for Papers

Saturday, February 26, 2022 

University of Florida (Gainesville, FL) 

 

Fifth University of Florida Classics Graduate Student Symposium

At the Margins: New Perspectives on the Ancient Mediterranean

 

Many of the traditional research trajectories in the field of Classics focus on limited perspectives that hinder a robust understanding of the societies that comprised the Ancient Mediterranean. As Classics seeks to address the concerns of the 21st century, some long ignored or forgotten elements of ancient studies are helping paint a more vivid and accurate image of the realities we study. To continue the conversation that frames the Ancient Mediterranean in a full context, we seek pioneering approaches to inquiries on the ancient world. How should “Ancient Mediterranean” and “Classics” be defined? Who has been historically categorized as “other,” and what are the consequences of such distinctions? Whose overlooked perspectives (non-canonical authors, marginalized ethnic or social groups, disenfranchised individuals, etc.) can illuminate less-explored aspects of the Greco-Roman world (and beyond)? How can our field(s) benefit from such perspectives, and what are some methods with which we can begin to center them in our classrooms?  

 

We invite papers that will discuss such topics from the fields of classics, art history, literature, and archaeology with a focus on Ancient Mediterranean cultures. Pressing issues we seek to discuss include hearing the voices of oppressed peoples, observing overlooked or neglected accomplishments and narratives, understanding marginalized groups in light of modern methods, and viewing the ancient world from a non-elite, decolonized lens. While our focus is on the Ancient Mediterranean, we encourage submissions that compare these cultures to other ancient, medieval, or modern cultures. Interdisciplinary submissions are also encouraged.   

 

Topics may include but are not limited to:  

 

  • Archaeological or socio-cultural studies examining liminal groups such as women, children, prostitutes, differently abled persons, prisoners, laborers, foreigners, etc.   
  • Textual or visual approaches from the ancient or modern world with the main subject matter concerning marginalized groups  
  • Literary and/or linguistic approaches to lesser-known works of literature, particularly those authored by writers of commonly disregarded groups  
  • Topics focusing on societies located at or beyond the margins of the major empires of classical study (Greece and Rome)  
  • Traditional research trajectories explored through modern lenses such as feminist or Marxist criticism 
  • Methods to incorporate the study of marginalized groups in modern educational settings  
  • Reception of the Ancient Mediterranean by ancient or modern cultures, specifically those less represented in classical scholarship 

Please submit an abstract of no more than 250 words by October 1, 2021 by emailing a .docx attachment to gradsymposium@classics.ufl.edu. Please include your name, affiliation, and the title of your abstract in the body of your email. Final papers should be no longer than 20 minutes. Selected proceedings completed via a double-blind peer review process will be published by the UF Smathers Libraries Press.  

 

Any questions should be addressed to the same email address.   

 

N.B. The Symposium is currently scheduled to be hosted in person at the University of Florida, following any remaining university, local, or national pandemic restrictions. However, we can accommodate participants who would prefer to present remotely. If necessary, we are also prepared to host the entire Symposium online.   

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"Some time in the 1920s, the Conservative statesman F. E. Smith — Lord Birkenhead — gave a copy of the “Nicomachean Ethics” to his close friend Winston Churchill. He did so saying there were those who thought this was the greatest book of all time. Churchill returned it some weeks later, saying it was all very interesting, but he had already thought most of it out for himself. But it is the very genius of Aristotle — as it is of every great teacher — to make you think he is uncovering your own thought in his. In Churchill’s case, it is also probable that the classical tradition informed more of his upbringing, at home and at school, than he realized." 

Read more of Harry Jaffa's review of Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics (Robert C. Bartlett and Susan D. Collins, trans.) at the New York Times online…

View full article. | Posted in Book Reviews on Sat, 07/02/2011 - 5:31pm by Information Architect.

Mary Beard regrets that an elegant history of Rome is marred by howlers. Read the review at The Guardian online.

View full article. | Posted in Book Reviews on Wed, 06/29/2011 - 1:13pm by Information Architect.

http://www.digitalclassicist.org/

The Digital Classicist is a decentralised and international community of scholars and students interested in the application of innovative digital methods and technologies to research on the ancient world. The Digital Classicist is not core funded, and nor is it owned by any institution. The main purpose of this site is to offer a web-based hub for discussion, collaboration and communication.

View full article. | Posted in Websites and Resources on Thu, 06/23/2011 - 1:35pm by .

"An enigmatic message on a Roman gladiator's 1,800-year-old tombstone has finally been decoded, telling a treacherous tale. The epitaph and art on the tombstone suggest the gladiator, named Diodorus, lost the battle (and his life) due to a referee's error, according to Michael Carter, a professor at Brock University in St. Catharines, Canada. Carter studies gladiator contests and other spectacles in the eastern part of the Roman Empire." Read more at LiveScience.com…

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Mon, 06/20/2011 - 1:25pm by Information Architect.

"Jacques A. Bailly, an associate professor of classics at the University of Vermont, is the department's director of graduate studies. He has also been the official pronouncer of words at the Scripps National Spelling Bee since 2003. He won the annual bee as an eighth grader in 1980." Read the interview with Prof. Bailly at The Chronicle of Higher Education's web site.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Thu, 06/16/2011 - 3:37pm by Information Architect.

"NATO refused to say Tuesday whether or not it would bomb ancient Roman ruins in Libya if it knew Moammar Gadhafi was hiding military equipment there. 'We will strike military vehicles, military forces, military equipment or military infrastructure that threaten Libyan civilians as necessary,' a NATO official in Naples told CNN, declining to give his name in discussing internal NATO deliberations." Read more at CNN World online.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Tue, 06/14/2011 - 2:30pm by Information Architect.

The American Philological Association is pleased to announce the appointment of Dr. Ellen Bauerle of the University of Michigan Press as Editor, and Dr. Wells Hansen of Milton Academy as Assistant Editor, of Amphora, its Outreach publication, effective January 2012.

Ellen has for several years worked as the editor for classics and archaeology at the University of Michigan Press. She also oversees book production for the not-for-profit Michigan Classical Press, and in the past has created and sold ebooks on the web.  Recipient of a BA in Greek and English from Oberlin College, and an MA and PhD in Classics from the University of Michigan - Ann Arbor, she has been an Eric P. Newman Fellow at the American Numismatic Society and Seymour Fellow at the American School of Classical Studies in Athens.  Ellen is delighted that Amphora is evolving to include the latest technologies, as additional ways of reaching its key constituencies among interested nonspecialists, scholars, teachers and students at the secondary level, and administrators.  

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 06/13/2011 - 6:27pm by .

Read Michael Collier's poem "Laelaps" and a critical essay about it by Lisa Russ Sparr at The Chronicle of Higher Education's web site.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Mon, 06/13/2011 - 2:29pm by Information Architect.

Got Latin? Got Greek?

View full article. | Posted in Degree and Certificate Programs on Fri, 06/10/2011 - 2:42pm by .

Delivered by Charlie Bridge (Class of 2011), a Classics Concentrator, at Harvard Commencement on May 27:

Rota Fortunae

Praeses Faust; Decani Professoresque sapientissimi; familiae, amici, et hospites honoratissimi; et tandem condiscipuli carissimi…salvete omnes!  Mihi voluptas magna atque honor altus est huius ceremoniae incipiendae in hoc theatro augusto Trecentensimo.  Nec solum conventum ultimum classis nostrae, anni duomillensimi et undecimi, sed etiam conventum trecentensimum et sexagensimum huius universitatis hodie celebramus. 

Hoc cum animadvertissem gaudebam, propter sensum singularem numeri trecenti et sexaginta.  Ne mihi quidem, litterarum antiquarum discipulo, latere potest orbem omnem in partes trecentas et sexaginta esse divisum.  Venit etiam in mentem orbis quidam praecipuus, qui vitas nostras hos quattuor annos rexit: Rota scilicet Fortunae Harvardiana.  Temporibus antiquis, rota signum erat levis mobilisque naturae fatorum – circuitus vel unus cladem felicissimis afferre atque miseros extollere potest.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Tue, 06/07/2011 - 7:05pm by Information Architect.

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