CFP: Food and Drink in the Ancient World

Food and Drink in the Ancient World

Rutgers University, May 31 - June 1, 2019
Keynote Speaker: Kristina Killgrove, UNC Chapel Hill

Human activity is regulated by the constant need to acquire and consume food. Assuredly, food and drink played a significant role in antiquity just as now, and, since we all must eat and drink, we naturally become curious about what and how our distant ancestors ate and drank (Alcock 2006). The study of food and drink in the ancient world expanded tremendously in the 1990s and has continued to do so in the decades following (e.g. Davison 1997, Garnsey 1999, Wilkins and Hill 2006). This resultant trend is partly owed to a focus in research less preoccupied with the great deeds of great men, but one open to seeing antiquity as a period that offers a wealth of information on the varied life of the everyday world (Donahue 2015).

One does not need to look far in the corpus of classical literature to find mention of viands—there is animal sacrifice in the epics of Homer and Vergil, ever-flowing wine in the sympotic and love elegies of Alcaeus and Horace, conceited cooks in the comedies of Aristophanes and Plautus, and indulgence in the elite banquets of theDeipnosophistai and Satyrica. Beyond these portraits, there are ancient treatises specifically devoted to the topic of food and drink—both philosophical, such as Porphyry’s On Abstinence from Animal Food, and medical, e.g. Galen’s On the Power of Foods. In supplementation of investigations based on literary texts, archaeology has produced an immense amount of information for our understanding of consumption in antiquity. From grand tomb finds to the more ordinary discoveries of kitchen utensils, excavations have dramatically clarified our picture of ancient dining. Archaeozoology and archaeobotany have helped answer questions about ancient diets, as have the osteological analyses associated with bioarchaeology.

We invite abstracts for papers that explore the topic of food and drink through various disciplines, such as Classics, Archaeology, Anthropology, Food Science, and related fields. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

 -  The Ancient Mediterranean Diet

      -   Staple foods in the Mediterranean (wine, oil, and bread; cereals and legumes)

      -   Meat consumption, availability of seafood

      -   Specialized diets, medical approaches to nutrition (e.g. for the military, athletes, infirm)

 -  The Social Context of Food and Drink

      -   Sacrifices and offerings, public and communal meals

      -   Variations in diet based on social class

      -   Food supply and shortages, grain doles (e.g. frumentatioannona)

 -  Food as a Point of Contact, Creator of Identity, Delimitation of Otherness

      -   Import and markets, especially for spices and exotic ingredients

      -   Horticulture, soil chemistry, and cultivation of local specialties

      -   Taboos (e.g. beer and milk as barbarian; cannibalism as historical fact or political slander)

 -  Alcoholic and Non-Alcoholic Beverages

      -   Wine and viticulture (e.g. merummulsum, and conditum)

      -   Access to potable water, aqueducts

      -   Drinking vessels (e.g. kylikesskyphoikantharoi, and their images)

Our confirmed keynote speaker is Dr. Kristina Killgrove, teaching assistant professor of anthropology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, research scholar at the Ronin Institute, and senior contributor to Forbes. Dr. Killgrove, a bioarchaeologist, will deliver a talk on Roman diet and its correlation to disease, climate change, and migration.

Please send abstracts of no more than 300 words (excluding bibliography) by February 1st, 2019 to rutgers.foodanddrinkconference@gmail.com. Be sure to include any audio-visual needs in this email. Papers should be no more than 20 minutes in length. Please include in the email your name, affiliation, and contact information. The abstract itself should be anonymous. Questions may be sent to the same email. Successful applicants should expect to hear back from conference organizers by February 28th, 2019. In addition to providing accommodation, we are looking forward to hosting an ‘ancient’ feast for the conference organizers and speakers.

(Written by Emmanuel Aprilakis and Nicole Nowbahar [PhD Students, Rutgers University])

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(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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As Chair of the Search Committee, I am happy to report that Professor Craig Gibson of the University of Iowa has accepted our invitation to become the next Editor of the Transactions of the American Philological Association.  Professor Gibson is a distinguished and very productive scholar of ancient literature and its intersections with other aspects of ancient culture.  His term as Editor will run from January 5, 2014 to January 7, 2018.  An announcement concerning the transition of responsibility from current Editor Katharina Volk to Professor Gibson and protocol for submission of manuscripts will soon be published on the web site and in the Association Newsletter.

I want to thank the other members of the Search Committee (John Bodel, Jeff Henderson, Chris Kraus, and Adam Blistein) for their assistance in the completion of this successful search.  I also very much appreciate the interest that the Committee saw from the other highly qualified candidates for this position.  Finally, we are grateful to Department of Classics of the University of Iowa for its support of the arrangements necessary to enable Professor Gibson to accept this position. 

Michael Gagarin
Vice President for Publications and Research

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 01/29/2013 - 7:48pm by Adam Blistein.

After three weeks, the 144th Annual Meeting in Seattle is receding into history, and it is a good moment to take stock of what a successful meeting it proved to be.  The host department from UW-Seattle, led by Ruby Blondell and Alain Gowing, did a superb job, and we thank them all for helping to make the Meeting such a success.  Even the Northwest weather cooperated to make Seattle a great venue for us: on my fourth visit to Seattle I finally got to see Mt. Rainier.  There was a tremendous program of panels and performances, even if your officers, including the President, were unable to emerge from their seclusion in committee rooms to enjoy more than a small fraction of the riches on offer.

In the Plenary Session, we honored a remarkable group of teachers and scholars for their achievements. From the point of view of our Association’s history and future, the most significant moment in the Plenary Session was the celebration of the triumphant conclusion of the Gateway Campaign, steered to its harbor by President Jeffrey Henderson.  It was a delight to see the Campaign Committee members being honored, and to see Distinguished Service Awards presented to the three visionary and energetic APA members who provided such outstanding leadership from the beginning to the end of the Campaign: Ward W. Briggs, David H. Porter, and Michael C.J. Putnam.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 01/29/2013 - 7:46pm by Adam Blistein.

"Tools of the Trade" was conceived by Lowell Edmunds as a bibliographic guide for graduate students and others interested in furthering their knowledge of the Roman world. When the expansion of scholarly resources and the growing capabilities of web-based publication made a second edition desirable, Professor Edmunds decided to divide the project into thirteen discrete bibliographies, each with its own editor/compiler.At this point, the project was passed on to Sander M. Goldberg of UCLA, who has assumed responsibility for editing the final documents and posting them on this site. The content and form of each bibliography has been determined by the subject editor, who is identified in the heading for each document.

Download "Tools of the Trade".

View full article. | Posted in Websites and Resources on Sat, 01/12/2013 - 1:02pm by .

A short conference organised by the School of History, Classics and Archaeology, University of Edinburgh, UK.

Date:  Friday 15th-Saturday 16th March, 2012

The starting point for this conference is the lively and controversial figure of Caesarius, bishop of Arles from 502-542. Both Caesarius and the time in which he lived have been seen as emblematic of the cusp between the ancient and medieval eras. This conference brings together scholars from diverse backgrounds in order to throw light on this fascinating figure, an eventful period of late antique history, and the rich material culture of southern Gaul.

Friday 15th March Opening Lecture, 5pm

William Klingshirn (Catholic University of America): ‘Caesarius of Arles: 1970-2042: retrospect and prospect’

Saturday 16th March Day Conference (9am-6pm)

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Thu, 01/10/2013 - 2:08pm by .

Local newspapers published articles about the two winners of this year's Precollegiate Teaching Award.  The Seattle Times published this story about Nora Macdonald just before the annual meeting in that city.  The Delaware County Daily Times carried an article about Lee T. Pearcy.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 01/09/2013 - 6:43pm by Adam Blistein.

Dear APA Friends:

I have learned from close colleagues in my field of Hellenistic poetry at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki of the dire situation of their resources: they have no funds whatever to buy books for their library. For one of the prominent European departments in Classics, this is a truly difficult situation: senior professors and young scholars alike are deprived of access to the most recent scholarship and bibliographies, namely our newly published books. The situation is particularly hard on the graduate students, of which the department has a flourishing number. I have sent them copies of the costly new Callimachus volumes in the past year, but feel I really should try to do more, which is why I appeal to all of us as a community. Please consider donating any new books that you can spare, perhaps gratis or author discounted copies. I am aware that there are many competing demands on this resource, from significant omaggi to the convenience (often significant) of having a copy for one’s home study and university office. But given the gravity of their situation, I appeal to all of us to reconsider our priorities at this time: remember, ὑπá½²ρ πάντων – our debt to Greece is not a small one.

Packages may be sent to:

Prof. Ioannis Tzifopoulos, Chairman

or

Prof. Aimilios Mavroudis, Head of Department

View full article. | Posted in General Announcements on Mon, 12/31/2012 - 6:59pm by .

For the upcoming annual meeting in Seattle rooms at the convention rate ($139/night plus tax) are no longer available at the Sheraton Seattle Hotel.  The convention rate is still available at the Grand Hyatt Seattle Hotel.  The Hyatt is less than a city block away from the Washington State Convention Center where most sessions take place and almost as close to the Sheraton where many committee meetings and receptions will be located.  The institutions conducting job interviews who have rented their own suites are all located in the Hyatt.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 12/18/2012 - 5:05pm by Adam Blistein.

I have posted the Association's audited financial statements for the fiscal year that ended June 30, 2012.  I will discuss this report in my own Report of the Executive Director to be published at the end of this month, and I am happy to answer any individual questions that members may have. 

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 12/11/2012 - 6:43pm by Adam Blistein.

We have just posted the schedule of APA committee meetings and special events at the upcoming annual meeting in Seattle.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 12/06/2012 - 2:56pm by Adam Blistein.

The Greek Ministry of Education is studying a plan to relocate the University of Patras Department of Philology (24 faculty members and highly ranked) to a new university in Kalamata (175 miles away) and blend it with other humanities programs, against the recommendation of a recent external review. The decision will be made on the 15th of this month. Those interested in seeing the petition against this action, which needs a minimum of 454 signatures to be accepted by the Ministry, will find it here:

http://www.change.org/petitions/department-of-philology-university-of-patras-keep-the-department-in-patras-stop-its-relocation

Jeffrey Henderson

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 12/05/2012 - 8:17pm by Adam Blistein.

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