CFP: Food and Drink in the Ancient World

Food and Drink in the Ancient World

Rutgers University, May 31 - June 1, 2019
Keynote Speaker: Kristina Killgrove, UNC Chapel Hill

Human activity is regulated by the constant need to acquire and consume food. Assuredly, food and drink played a significant role in antiquity just as now, and, since we all must eat and drink, we naturally become curious about what and how our distant ancestors ate and drank (Alcock 2006). The study of food and drink in the ancient world expanded tremendously in the 1990s and has continued to do so in the decades following (e.g. Davison 1997, Garnsey 1999, Wilkins and Hill 2006). This resultant trend is partly owed to a focus in research less preoccupied with the great deeds of great men, but one open to seeing antiquity as a period that offers a wealth of information on the varied life of the everyday world (Donahue 2015).

One does not need to look far in the corpus of classical literature to find mention of viands—there is animal sacrifice in the epics of Homer and Vergil, ever-flowing wine in the sympotic and love elegies of Alcaeus and Horace, conceited cooks in the comedies of Aristophanes and Plautus, and indulgence in the elite banquets of theDeipnosophistai and Satyrica. Beyond these portraits, there are ancient treatises specifically devoted to the topic of food and drink—both philosophical, such as Porphyry’s On Abstinence from Animal Food, and medical, e.g. Galen’s On the Power of Foods. In supplementation of investigations based on literary texts, archaeology has produced an immense amount of information for our understanding of consumption in antiquity. From grand tomb finds to the more ordinary discoveries of kitchen utensils, excavations have dramatically clarified our picture of ancient dining. Archaeozoology and archaeobotany have helped answer questions about ancient diets, as have the osteological analyses associated with bioarchaeology.

We invite abstracts for papers that explore the topic of food and drink through various disciplines, such as Classics, Archaeology, Anthropology, Food Science, and related fields. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

 -  The Ancient Mediterranean Diet

      -   Staple foods in the Mediterranean (wine, oil, and bread; cereals and legumes)

      -   Meat consumption, availability of seafood

      -   Specialized diets, medical approaches to nutrition (e.g. for the military, athletes, infirm)

 -  The Social Context of Food and Drink

      -   Sacrifices and offerings, public and communal meals

      -   Variations in diet based on social class

      -   Food supply and shortages, grain doles (e.g. frumentatioannona)

 -  Food as a Point of Contact, Creator of Identity, Delimitation of Otherness

      -   Import and markets, especially for spices and exotic ingredients

      -   Horticulture, soil chemistry, and cultivation of local specialties

      -   Taboos (e.g. beer and milk as barbarian; cannibalism as historical fact or political slander)

 -  Alcoholic and Non-Alcoholic Beverages

      -   Wine and viticulture (e.g. merummulsum, and conditum)

      -   Access to potable water, aqueducts

      -   Drinking vessels (e.g. kylikesskyphoikantharoi, and their images)

Our confirmed keynote speaker is Dr. Kristina Killgrove, teaching assistant professor of anthropology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, research scholar at the Ronin Institute, and senior contributor to Forbes. Dr. Killgrove, a bioarchaeologist, will deliver a talk on Roman diet and its correlation to disease, climate change, and migration.

Please send abstracts of no more than 300 words (excluding bibliography) by February 1st, 2019 to rutgers.foodanddrinkconference@gmail.com. Be sure to include any audio-visual needs in this email. Papers should be no more than 20 minutes in length. Please include in the email your name, affiliation, and contact information. The abstract itself should be anonymous. Questions may be sent to the same email. Successful applicants should expect to hear back from conference organizers by February 28th, 2019. In addition to providing accommodation, we are looking forward to hosting an ‘ancient’ feast for the conference organizers and speakers.

(Written by Emmanuel Aprilakis and Nicole Nowbahar [PhD Students, Rutgers University])

---

(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

Categories

Follow SCS News for information about the SCS and all things classical.

Use this field to search SCS News
Select a category from this list to limit the content on this page.

The Alfried Krupp von Bohlen und Halbach-Stiftung announces two to four scholarships for non-German postgraduates or non-German scholars with a PhD to conduct research at the Historisches Institut, Abt. Alte Geschichte, University of Cologne.  Scholarships are for periods ranging between 6 and 24 months. Recipients of the scholarships will receive amounts that correspond with those granted by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (currently about 1.200 € per month for a postgraduate, 1.800 € per month for a scholar with a PhD.).  The scholarships are intended for projects from all disciplines of classical studies pertaining to the general topic of "centre and periphery", but projects in Greek or Latin epigraphy of the high empire and late antiquity are especially encouraged.

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Wed, 03/05/2014 - 3:23pm by Adam Blistein.

As part of Aquila Theatre’s National Endowment for the Humanities multiyear Award for You|Stories, Aquila will explore Sophocles’ ancient play Philoctetes and reimagine it with the title role played as a female combat soldier. Aquila Theatre is a veteran of Greek Classical Theatre and will boldly take on this newest endeavor. Join us as we present, A Female Philoctetes, a staged reading, translated by Peter Meineck and directed and adapted by Desiree Sanchez. Post show talk backs to follow each performance. This event is part of You|Stories – Aquila’s innovative public program funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, which uses ancient drama to inspire modern stories. An interactive You|Stories app and web platform will allow the veteran community and the public to explore these ancient stories and be inspired to tell their own. These new narratives will be archived at the Library of Congress. 

Performances will take place at BAM Fisher, 321 Ashland Place, Brooklyn, NY 11217 at 7:00 p.m. from April 16-19.  Call 718.636.4100 for tickets or visit http://www.bam.org/theater/2014/a-female-philoctetes

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 03/04/2014 - 3:44pm by Adam Blistein.

The Classical Association of the Atlantic States (CAAS) seeks a Webmaster to work jointly with our current Webmaster beginning on or about June 1, 2014, and to assume full responsibility beginning October 11, 2014. The position has a three-year, renewable term, subject to annual review by the CAAS Board of Directors. The annual stipend will be $4,000, subject to approval by the Board.

The Webmaster will manage the online process of submitting and evaluating abstracts to support the Program Committee; maintain the platforms supporting the organization’s work (e.g. WordPress, Google Apps, Insightly) and identify new platforms as needed; facilitate document-sharing for Board meetings; manage email aliases for Board members, and so forth.

In consultation with CAAS senior officers, the Webmaster will have editorial oversight of articles posted on the website and will have responsibility for publishing announcements to the CAAS community online and via email. The Webmaster also will guide CAAS in implementing and overseeing social media in support of our mission.

Applicants should send a cover letter and a curriculum vitae by April 1, 2014, to the chair of the search committee: Professor Janet M. Martin, CAAS President, by email at <jmmartin@princeton.edu>.

View full article. | Posted in General Announcements on Tue, 03/04/2014 - 10:44am by Adam Blistein.

Unexpectedly spending a couple of extra days in Chicago this January, as I viewed quiet snowfall against the backdrop of the seasonal lights on the Wrigley Building and watched the gradual freezing of the Chicago River, I found moments of calm to reflect on the state of our APA as I had come to know it during my year as President-Elect. One deceptively simple word seemed to encapsulate the complex process of finding our way forward in this fast-paced world as an organization devoted to the distant past, and that word is service. The APA is a service organization, which has traditionally meant service to those who choose to be members but now increasingly means also service to others, to any and all who wish to participate in our various explorations of the classical world. How to frame the interaction of these two is our current challenge.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 02/26/2014 - 11:00am by Adam Blistein.

The Digital Latin Library (DLL) will be a site on the Internet where people with varying levels of interest and expertise in Latin can find, read, discuss, study, teach, edit, and annotate Latin texts of all eras, whether for personal use or for open-access, peer-reviewed publication by one of the three learned societies affiliated with the project: the American Philological Association (APA), the Medieval Academy of America (MAA), and the Renaissance Society of America (RSA). Similar to a traditional public research library, the DLL will have a catalog, a variety of collections of texts and reference materials, and working space for both individuals and groups. Unlike a research library, it will also provide tools to facilitate the creation and publication of open, born-digital critical editions and other scholarly and pedagogical resources that take full advantage of powerful technologies and techniques such as Linked Open Data (LOD), information visualization, and visual data analysis, opening up new possibilities for the communication of scholarly ideas.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 02/26/2014 - 10:55am by Adam Blistein.

In response to a request by members at the annual business meeting in Chicago last month, the APA Board of Directors has authorized me to publish the tabulation of votes in last summer’s referendum concerning the change of the Association’s name.  As members are aware, it has been the Association’s policy for almost two decades not to publish numerical tabulations when we report election results (although any individual member may request a tabulation from me).  The Board is willing to make an exception in this case because no individual candidate is included in the results below. 

The referendum question asked members to vote on the Board’s recommendation that the Association’s name be changed to the Society for Classical Studies provided that the new name was accompanied by the following subtitle:  “Founded in 1869 as the American Philological Association”.  In last summer’s election a total of 1,305 members cast a ballot on at least one slate.  On the referendum question

603 voted to approve the new name
552 voted to disapprove the new name
137 checked the box to abstain
13 cast no vote at all

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 02/26/2014 - 8:57am by Adam Blistein.

The 2013-2014 Nominating Committee has submitted its report, which includes the slate of candidates for the election to be held this summer.  Members are reminded that it is possible to nominate additional candidates by petition.  Nominations of candidates not proposed by the Nominating Committee shall require the signature of twenty members in good standing (2014 dues must be paid) and must be reported to the Executive Director by April 15, 2014.  A current curriculum vitae of the candidate, who must also be a member in good standing, should be submitted by the same deadline.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 02/25/2014 - 2:33pm by Adam Blistein.

National Public Radio presents a talk by a classics teacher (among other things) with an unusual view of the subjunctive.

http://www.npr.org/2013/12/13/248195238/does-the-subjunctive-have-a-dark-side

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Mon, 02/17/2014 - 4:15pm by Adam Blistein.

Greek Myth is one of the standbys of Classics general-education courses at colleges and universities across the United States.  These courses often have high enrollments and are populated by students with little prior knowledge about the ancient Mediterranean world who are taking the course to fulfill a degree requirement.  They may take Myth because of a lifelong interest in the stories (or because they’ve read the Percy Jackson series), they may be inspired to major in Classics by the course, or they may never read or think about Graeco-Roman culture after the term ends.

A common way of teaching the Myth survey course is like a panorama, a wide-angle shot that tries to fit in as much content as possible from a high-altitude perspective.  I took a different approach in my fall 2013 Greek Myth course at Wake Forest University — a closeup, zooming in on one specific ancient myth-cycle in elaborate detail.  Rather than try to cover Graeco-Roman mythology from Chaos to Romulus, encountering tidbits of art and literature from Homer to Ovid, my course focused on just one mythic figure, and students studied every major visual and textual treatment of that figure that survives from the ancient world.

The myth-cycle I selected was Herakles/Hercules.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 02/17/2014 - 12:22pm by T. H. M. Gellar-Goad.

Due to bad weather conditions, the University of Pennsylvania has suspended normal operations for February 13, 2014.  The APA Office will therefore be closed as well.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 02/12/2014 - 8:27pm by Adam Blistein.

Pages

Latest Stories

Calls for Papers
Classical Memories Modern Identities Series
Awards and Fellowships
Residential Fellowships 2021-22
SCS Announcements
Dear members and past annual meeting attendees,

© 2020, Society for Classical Studies Privacy Policy