CFP: Globalizing Ovid: Shanghai 2017

An International Conference in Commemoration of the Bimillennium of Ovid’s Death

Guangqi International Center for Scholars of Shanghai Normal University May 31–June 2, 2017 Jointly sponsored by the Chinese National Social Science Foundation, Shanghai Normal University, and Dickinson College Keynote speakers:

  • Michael von Albrecht (Universität Heidelberg)
  • Maurizio Bettini (Università di Siena)
  • John Miller (University of Virginia)
  • Alison Sharrock (University of Manchester)
  • Gareth Williams (Columbia University)
  • Wei Zhang (Fudan University)

Welcome addresses:

  • Fritz-Heiner Mutschler (Universität Dresden/Peking University)
  • Yang Huang (Fudan University)

Concluding addresses:

  • Laurel Fulkerson (Florida State University)

DEADLINE FOR THE SUBMISSION OF ABSTRACTS: April 30, 2016

 

Why Shanghai?

One may be surprised to learn that this is not the first time that an anniversary of a Latin poet is commemorated in China. 1930, the Bimillennium of Vergil’s birth, represented a watershed in the reception of Vergil and Roman literature in China. Aeneid Book I and Eclogues IV and VIII were translated into Chinese for the first time. The translator praised Vergil’s “modern” spirit: his critical attitude toward Empire, his questioning of the cost of civilization, his doubts of the value of progress, and his portrayal of the loneliness of his main characters. In 1932, well-known poet Dai Wangshu translated Ovid’s Ars Amatoria into vernacular Chinese prose based on Ovide: L'Art d'Aimer in the Collection Budé. These translations were both products of and participants in the Chinese exploration of modernity and a “New Culture,” a process that involved a full scale reexamination of a wide range of issues, from the status of the Confucian canon, relationships with authority, modes of heroism, gender roles and sexuality, to ways of expressing desire and emotion. It was only after a long hiatus that complete translations of Ovid’s Metamorphoses and Vergil’s Aeneid appeared in 1984 and 1987 respectively, both created by Yang Zhouhan (1915–1989), working from the original Latin and various English translations. Today there is a remarkable surge in interest in both Chinese and Western classics in China. Latin literature is gaining momentum at a speed faster than one could have imagined a generation ago. In 2015 the Chinese National Social Science Foundation announced “Translating the Complete Corpus of Ovid’s poetry into Chinese with Commentaries” (PI: Jinyu Liu) as one of the major projects to fund in the next five years. With this initiative, Ovid’s Fasti and exile poetry will be translated into Chinese for the first time, his other poems will be retranslated, and comprehensive commentaries will accompany the translations of all of Ovid’s poems for the first time. Consilium resque locusque dabunt (Tristia I.1.92) This conference serves as an opportunity not only to pay tribute to Ovid, but also to promote cross-cultural conversations about the globalization of the Greco-Roman Classics. The conference invites papers that represent the most recent developments in the Ovidian scholarship—philological, textual, critical, literary, and historical—as well as contributions that explore perspectives from comparativism, translingualism, and postclassicism to address larger issues of translating and interpreting the Classics in a globalizing world. These two strands of themes should not be perceived as being either isolated from or in competition against each other, especially if scholars and translators of Ovid are understood as participants in assigning meanings to his work. The conference intends to bring together scholars and translators to explore the dynamic processes of selection, tension, and negotiation that have been integral to the making and interpreting of Classical canon, including Ovid. How has Ovid been taught, disseminated, transmitted, and evaluated in Roman antiquity and in other cultures? If the viability of the Greco-Roman Classics in the postclassical eras, and in the non-Western contexts hinges on the willingness of the host cultures to assign new meanings to them, what may motivate that “willingness,” and through whose agency? What are those new meanings? Where and how are they being worked out and developed? What translation strategies have been applied to Ovid’s poetry in different locales and languages, and for what audiences? What are the challenges of translating Ovid in cultures with their own vibrant but different poetic traditions, and literary culture concerning themes of love, abandonment, transformation, and exile? How and where are Classics changed by their interaction with different host cultures?

Topics and abstract submissions: The conference will include plenary addresses, individual paper presentations, as well as roundtables organized by project team members and the board of referees (see below). In accordance with the dual function of the conference both to highlight current scholarship and trends in thinking on Ovid and to consider modes of cross-cultural reception, comparison, and translation, we provide the following list to illustrate the range of questions and topics in which the conference is interested. It is by no means an exclusive or restrictive list:

  • Amor: Force of destruction?
  • Emotions in Ovid
  • The dearth of same-sex relationships in Ovid
  • Intertextuality in Ovid: What’s new?
  • The Ovidian aesthetics
  • Ovid’s literary persona(e)
  • Ovid’s lieux de mémoire
  • The psychology of exile in the Ovidian corpus
  • The human and Roman past(s) in Ovid
  • Ovid in provinces and Roman imperialism
  • Locus urbanus versus locus barbarus in Ovid
  • Seduction in ancient literature: a comparative examination
  • Tales of Transformation compared (within Metamorphoses, across genres, and/or across cultures)
  • The Ovidian corpus: critical editions
  • Teaching Ovid in Antiquity and/or the modern world
  • Translating Ovid (and Classics in general) in a Global Context
  • Visualizing Ovid
  • Post-classical Ovid (reception and adaptation in all genres)
  • Commentary tradition and digital commentary

We welcome submissions from advanced doctoral students and scholars of all seniorities. Please send brief vitae and proposals (300 words excluding bibliography) for 25-minute papers by April 30, 2016 to Jinyu Liu, HH 117, Department of Classical Studies, DePauw University, Greencastle, IN 46135, USA, or email: both OvidShanghai2017@hotmail.com and jliu@depauw.edu. Abstract submissions will be evaluated by a board of seven referees, whose names are listed below, and the results will be announced by June 1, 2016:

  • Christopher Francese (Dickinson College, USA)
  • Laurel Fulkerson (Florida State University, USA)
  • Steven Green (Yale-NUS, Singapore)
  • Jinyu Liu (DePauw University/Shanghai Normal University, USA/China)
  • Lisa Mignone (Brown University, USA)
  • Bobby Xinyue (University of Warwick, UK)
  • Wei Zhang (Fudan University, China)

Publication plan:

Selected contributions will be translated into Chinese, and published in either a collected volume or in Chinese academic journals. The authors will retain copyright to the non-Chinese versions of their articles. The possibility of publishing the conference proceedings in English with a European or American publisher will also be explored.

Organizers:

  • Heng Chen (Shanghai Normal University)
  • Christopher Francese (Dickinson College)
  • Jinyu Liu (DePauw University/Shanghai Normal University)

*Please send all inquiries to Professor Jinyu Liu at jliu@depauw.edu. Join us as we make history!

Image: Robinet Testard, Ipsipile scrive a Giasone (Source: Folia Magazine)

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What’s So Funny?

Discovering and Interpreting Humor in the Ancient World

20-21 April 2018

The Ohio State University

Columbus, Ohio 

Keynote Speakers:

•    Jack Sasson (Emeritus Professor, Vanderbilt University)

•    Ian Ruffell (Classics, University of Glasgow)

•    Amy Richlin (Classics, University of California at Los Angeles)

•    Christine Hayes (Religious Studies, Yale University)

Humor is a ubiquitous human phenomenon with a wide range of applications. Yet, what is deemed humorous is often culturally determined. This poses a significant challenge for scholars of ancient cultures. How do we identify what an ancient culture found funny? How did they use humor, and what drove their usage?

The purpose of this conference is to provide a forum for scholars across disciplines to discuss and debate humor and its functions in both textual and material sources across the ancient Mediterranean, from the early Near East through late antiquity. We invite papers that address the above questions, or any others, on the topic of humor in an ancient Mediterranean context.  

Possible topics include:

•       Theoretical models for identifying and understanding humor and comedy in ancient cultures

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 06/23/2017 - 7:48am by Erik Shell.

The inaugural conference of the Canadian Aristotle Society conference will be May 9, 10, and 11, 2018, at the Dominican University College, Ottawa, ON.  The theme of this conference is the following:  Aristotle: A Critic of Plato. Please submit a one-page abstract to Dr. Mark Nyvlt at mark.nyvlt@dominicanu.ca.  The deadline is January 31st, 2018.  Our first Keynote speaker will be Dr. Thomas De Koninck.

The purpose of the bilingual Canadian Aristotle Society is to establish a Centre wherein the themes of Aristotle, along with the Aristotelian tradition, are kept alive by way of either conferences or eventually publications.  The spirit of this Society will be speculative and classical in nature, though this does not exclude the analytical and continental traditions.  That the Faculty of Philosophy at the Dominican University will house this Society can only enrich its mission to sustain the Aristotelian spirit by both the Anglophone and Francophone communities in Canada and beyond.  Their intention is to make this Society into a dynamic Centre that will attract primarily Aristotelian scholars, but also scholars and interested parties from various other disciplines, such as the classics, theology, politics, art, etc.

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Bonjour,

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 06/21/2017 - 3:13pm by Erik Shell.

THEORIZING CONTACTS IN THE ROMAN EMPIRE
UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH, 8-9 December 2017

We live in a multicultural world, in which every community develops in constant interaction with others. A series of theoretical models have been developed to explain these contacts, which in recent years have been utilized to understand the ancient world. In the context of the Roman empire, these theories are typically used to examine the interactions of various indigenous populations with their rulers. These kinds of studies were once grouped under the heading “Romanization”, though the increased questioning of the term’s validity has given rise to a diverse range of alternatives. These are often drawn from modern theoretical backgrounds: multiculturalism and multilingualism are two recent concepts employed in this realm.

The aim of this conference is to assess the validity and scope of a variety of some of these models, with a particular focus on multilingualism and multiculturalism. By promoting and facilitating dialogue between disciplines, we shall aim to provide effective tools for different fields’ approaches in parallel (e.g. historical and linguistic). This has already been done very successfully in a few cases (e.g. ‘code-switching’), though greater interaction remains a desideratum. It is hoped that the participants will thereby open the discussion for a ‘theory of contact’ in the Roman world.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Wed, 06/21/2017 - 8:40am by Erik Shell.

The Atlas Project of Roman Aqueducts (ROMAQ) is an initiative to collect published information about Roman aqueducts from the period of 400 BC to 400 AD. The project website was developed between 2004 and 2011, but the database and other efforts do not appear to have been actively updated since 2013. As it stands, the project’s scope is limited to large aqueducts that served cities and towns, excluding smaller aqueducts that served areas like villas and mines. The need for such a project, as the authors highlight on the landing page, is four-fold:

  • aqueducts are important as cultural heritage;
  • bibliographic resources on aqueducts are in many languages and can be difficult to access;
  • aqueducts provide data for scientific topics like hydrology, geology, and engineering;
  • aqueducts are vulnerable to destruction.

The ROMAQ team particularly hoped that the compilation of information about aqueducts and their locations might reduce intentional and accidental damage.

The ROMAQ website has three parts: a map, the database of aqueducts, and a list of references.

The Map

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 06/19/2017 - 7:03pm by Jacqueline DiBiasie Sammons.

Presidential Letter

June 19, 2017

Dear Colleagues,

Recent weeks and months have seen an increase in the cultural tensions in our nation—and, indeed, the world.  It is not uncommon now for disagreements to escalate quickly into verbal attacks, threats of violence, and even—as recently took place in Washington, DC—actual violence.  Unquestionably, this tendency has been facilitated by social media.  But our digital media are only a means or instrument.  More troubling is the mentality fueling the rush to attack, across the political spectrum; and that is an unwillingness to verify information, weigh arguments, and attempt to make independent, rationally-grounded judgments.  These habits of mind are the very bedrock of learning and of scholarship; they are the principles on which the SCS, as a learned society, is founded and which we have a duty to uphold and protect.  

View full article. | Posted in Presidential Letters on Mon, 06/19/2017 - 11:11am by Helen Cullyer.

Beginning on Monday, June 26, the SCS Placement Service will enter its yearly maintenance session. That means that no new jobs will be posted and no jobs digests will be sent to subscribers for approximately two weeks.  All job ads placed prior to June 26 will be made public so that they are still accessible.  

We hope to reopen the Service after two weeks on Monday, July 10th. During the maintenance period we will implement some much-needed and frequently requested improvements, the details of which will be laid out in full when the Service reopens.

If you have any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to contact the Placement Coordinator Erik Shell at erik.shell@nyu.edu

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Fri, 06/16/2017 - 9:50am by Erik Shell.
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The American Numismatic Society has released a free article from their ANS Magazine publication discussing the relationship between the American Numismatic Society and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

You can read the article here: http://numismatics.org/pocketchange/neh-issue/

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(Photo: "2010 Logo fof the United States National Endowment for the Humanities" by the U.S. National Endowment for the Humanities, in the public domain)

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Thu, 06/15/2017 - 9:03am by Erik Shell.
Detail of bust in the Centrale Monemartini Museum

This article was originally published in Amphora 12.1. It has been edited slightly to adhere to current SCS blog conventions.

It is a great time to be a fan of both the classical world and heavy metal music: the two have never overlapped to the extent that they do right now. Consider, for example, the fact that in 2013 not one but two Italian metal bands, Heimdall and Stormlord, released concept albums based on Vergil’s Aeneid.

But this overlap is not a new phenomenon—in fact, far from it. Heavy metal music has drawn on the classical world almost from its very beginnings, and this interest in the classical world is part of a larger obsession with other times and places—both real and imagined— that is a defining characteristic of the genre. And since metal is a conservative genre (there are clear forefathers to whom almost all subsequent bands owe and acknowledge their allegiance), the interest in these kinds of subjects by earlier bands sanctioned continuous use of them by all subsequent bands.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 06/12/2017 - 12:00am by Kristopher Fletcher.

The Vergilian Society is soliciting proposals for the Third Annual Symposium Campanum, to take place at the Villa Vergiliana in Cuma in mid-October, 2018. We will consider proposals on any aspect of the history, archaeology, art and architecture, and geology of Italy and Sicily from the remotest antiquity to the Renaissance.

Each proposal should be prepared by the person who is intending to direct the symposium, or by the lead person if co-directors are envisioned.  The successful director will have logistical assistance from the Vergilian Society’s Italian staff and from the executive committee; a set of guidelines is available to assist in planning.

Proposals should be 250-300 words in length, giving a brief rationale for the theme, some thoughts on what kinds of subjects are likely to be treated, and the names of several scholars who have worked on this theme and might be approached to participate.  As international meetings, our symposia attract participants from all over the world, but since the Vergilian Society is an Italian-American cultural association, we are especially interested in seeing solid participation from scholars in these two countries.

Proposals should be submitted electronically by September 21, 2017 (new deadline!) to the president of the Vergilian Society, James O’Hara, at jimohara@unc.edu.

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View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 06/07/2017 - 3:23pm by Erik Shell.

The Celtic Conference in Classics in Montreal (July 19-21, 2017) has set its conference program. The panels and their speakers can be found at www.celticconferenceclassics.com. Panels cover a broad range of current debates in Classics including the problem of the fragmentary, epic and elegy, reception of classical drama, oratory and identity, ethnicity and imperialism, new directions in Plato, consciousness in Late Antiquity, and popular classics, to name a few. The CCC2017 cordially invites students, scholars, and interested parties to participate in the proceedings and enjoy collegial conversations on all things Classical.

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(Photo: "Empty Boardroom" by Reynermedia, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Wed, 06/07/2017 - 9:53am by Erik Shell.

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