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CFP: Globalizing Ovid: Shanghai 2017

An International Conference in Commemoration of the Bimillennium of Ovid’s Death

Guangqi International Center for Scholars of Shanghai Normal University May 31–June 2, 2017 Jointly sponsored by the Chinese National Social Science Foundation, Shanghai Normal University, and Dickinson College Keynote speakers:

  • Michael von Albrecht (Universität Heidelberg)
  • Maurizio Bettini (Università di Siena)
  • John Miller (University of Virginia)
  • Alison Sharrock (University of Manchester)
  • Gareth Williams (Columbia University)
  • Wei Zhang (Fudan University)

Welcome addresses:

  • Fritz-Heiner Mutschler (Universität Dresden/Peking University)
  • Yang Huang (Fudan University)

Concluding addresses:

  • Laurel Fulkerson (Florida State University)

DEADLINE FOR THE SUBMISSION OF ABSTRACTS: April 30, 2016

 

Why Shanghai?

One may be surprised to learn that this is not the first time that an anniversary of a Latin poet is commemorated in China. 1930, the Bimillennium of Vergil’s birth, represented a watershed in the reception of Vergil and Roman literature in China. Aeneid Book I and Eclogues IV and VIII were translated into Chinese for the first time. The translator praised Vergil’s “modern” spirit: his critical attitude toward Empire, his questioning of the cost of civilization, his doubts of the value of progress, and his portrayal of the loneliness of his main characters. In 1932, well-known poet Dai Wangshu translated Ovid’s Ars Amatoria into vernacular Chinese prose based on Ovide: L'Art d'Aimer in the Collection Budé. These translations were both products of and participants in the Chinese exploration of modernity and a “New Culture,” a process that involved a full scale reexamination of a wide range of issues, from the status of the Confucian canon, relationships with authority, modes of heroism, gender roles and sexuality, to ways of expressing desire and emotion. It was only after a long hiatus that complete translations of Ovid’s Metamorphoses and Vergil’s Aeneid appeared in 1984 and 1987 respectively, both created by Yang Zhouhan (1915–1989), working from the original Latin and various English translations. Today there is a remarkable surge in interest in both Chinese and Western classics in China. Latin literature is gaining momentum at a speed faster than one could have imagined a generation ago. In 2015 the Chinese National Social Science Foundation announced “Translating the Complete Corpus of Ovid’s poetry into Chinese with Commentaries” (PI: Jinyu Liu) as one of the major projects to fund in the next five years. With this initiative, Ovid’s Fasti and exile poetry will be translated into Chinese for the first time, his other poems will be retranslated, and comprehensive commentaries will accompany the translations of all of Ovid’s poems for the first time. Consilium resque locusque dabunt (Tristia I.1.92) This conference serves as an opportunity not only to pay tribute to Ovid, but also to promote cross-cultural conversations about the globalization of the Greco-Roman Classics. The conference invites papers that represent the most recent developments in the Ovidian scholarship—philological, textual, critical, literary, and historical—as well as contributions that explore perspectives from comparativism, translingualism, and postclassicism to address larger issues of translating and interpreting the Classics in a globalizing world. These two strands of themes should not be perceived as being either isolated from or in competition against each other, especially if scholars and translators of Ovid are understood as participants in assigning meanings to his work. The conference intends to bring together scholars and translators to explore the dynamic processes of selection, tension, and negotiation that have been integral to the making and interpreting of Classical canon, including Ovid. How has Ovid been taught, disseminated, transmitted, and evaluated in Roman antiquity and in other cultures? If the viability of the Greco-Roman Classics in the postclassical eras, and in the non-Western contexts hinges on the willingness of the host cultures to assign new meanings to them, what may motivate that “willingness,” and through whose agency? What are those new meanings? Where and how are they being worked out and developed? What translation strategies have been applied to Ovid’s poetry in different locales and languages, and for what audiences? What are the challenges of translating Ovid in cultures with their own vibrant but different poetic traditions, and literary culture concerning themes of love, abandonment, transformation, and exile? How and where are Classics changed by their interaction with different host cultures?

Topics and abstract submissions: The conference will include plenary addresses, individual paper presentations, as well as roundtables organized by project team members and the board of referees (see below). In accordance with the dual function of the conference both to highlight current scholarship and trends in thinking on Ovid and to consider modes of cross-cultural reception, comparison, and translation, we provide the following list to illustrate the range of questions and topics in which the conference is interested. It is by no means an exclusive or restrictive list:

  • Amor: Force of destruction?
  • Emotions in Ovid
  • The dearth of same-sex relationships in Ovid
  • Intertextuality in Ovid: What’s new?
  • The Ovidian aesthetics
  • Ovid’s literary persona(e)
  • Ovid’s lieux de mémoire
  • The psychology of exile in the Ovidian corpus
  • The human and Roman past(s) in Ovid
  • Ovid in provinces and Roman imperialism
  • Locus urbanus versus locus barbarus in Ovid
  • Seduction in ancient literature: a comparative examination
  • Tales of Transformation compared (within Metamorphoses, across genres, and/or across cultures)
  • The Ovidian corpus: critical editions
  • Teaching Ovid in Antiquity and/or the modern world
  • Translating Ovid (and Classics in general) in a Global Context
  • Visualizing Ovid
  • Post-classical Ovid (reception and adaptation in all genres)
  • Commentary tradition and digital commentary

We welcome submissions from advanced doctoral students and scholars of all seniorities. Please send brief vitae and proposals (300 words excluding bibliography) for 25-minute papers by April 30, 2016 to Jinyu Liu, HH 117, Department of Classical Studies, DePauw University, Greencastle, IN 46135, USA, or email: both OvidShanghai2017@hotmail.com and jliu@depauw.edu. Abstract submissions will be evaluated by a board of seven referees, whose names are listed below, and the results will be announced by June 1, 2016:

  • Christopher Francese (Dickinson College, USA)
  • Laurel Fulkerson (Florida State University, USA)
  • Steven Green (Yale-NUS, Singapore)
  • Jinyu Liu (DePauw University/Shanghai Normal University, USA/China)
  • Lisa Mignone (Brown University, USA)
  • Bobby Xinyue (University of Warwick, UK)
  • Wei Zhang (Fudan University, China)

Publication plan:

Selected contributions will be translated into Chinese, and published in either a collected volume or in Chinese academic journals. The authors will retain copyright to the non-Chinese versions of their articles. The possibility of publishing the conference proceedings in English with a European or American publisher will also be explored.

Organizers:

  • Heng Chen (Shanghai Normal University)
  • Christopher Francese (Dickinson College)
  • Jinyu Liu (DePauw University/Shanghai Normal University)

*Please send all inquiries to Professor Jinyu Liu at jliu@depauw.edu. Join us as we make history!

Image: Robinet Testard, Ipsipile scrive a Giasone (Source: Folia Magazine)

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THE IMPACT OF LEARNING GREEK, HEBREW, AND ‘ORIENTAL’ LANGUAGES ON SCHOLARSHIP, SCIENCE, AND SOCIETY IN THE MIDDLE AGES AND THE RENAISSANCE

LECTIO INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE
13-15 December 2017
UNIVERSITY OF LEUVEN (BELGIUM)

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 04/20/2017 - 11:44am by Erik Shell.

Please be aware that the deadline for individual abstracts for the 2018 annual meeting in Boston is April 26 (next Wednesday). You can submit your abstract here.

Also keep in mind the following upcoming deadlines for other SCS opportunities:

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View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 04/20/2017 - 8:30am by Erik Shell.

The online Packard Humanities Institute’s Classical Latin Texts (PHI) makes freely available material that was originally included on the PHI’s CD ROM 5.3, issued in 1991. It contains the vast majority of Latin literary texts written before 200 CE, as well as a handful of Latin texts from late antiquity. It therefore offers an alternative to two other free online resources: The Latin Library and the Perseus Project. The former has already been reviewed for  this blog by Ted Gellar-Goad, and some of his criticisms of it apply equally to PHI. In particular, due partly to copyright issues, users in search of an apparatus criticus, grammatical reading aids, and any sort of commentary will find none of that here. What they will find is a cleanly-edited and robust collection of well-known and less well-known Latin authors, as well as a trio of aids to translation and scholarly analysis.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 04/17/2017 - 2:31pm by Matthew Loar.

We are delighted to announce the following winners of the 2017 Pedagogy Awards:

Ronnie Ancona (Hunter College, CUNY) has been awarded funds in order to attend the Paideia Institute's Living Latin in NYC program.

Sarah E. Bond (University of Iowa) has been awarded funds in order to present at Digital Humanities 2017 on the use of digital mapping techniques in teaching complex literary texts.

Sarah Harrell (Bentley Upper School) has been awarded funds in order to participate in the Vergilian Society's Latin Authors in Italy: a Study Tour for Teachers

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Mon, 04/17/2017 - 12:09pm by Helen Cullyer.

Donald Mastronarde, SCS Member and Vice President for Publications and Research, has been elected as a fellow of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences.

Here are the links to view the initial AAAS Press release or see the list of newly elected fellows.

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(Photo: "library" by Viva Vivanista, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Wed, 04/12/2017 - 9:33am by Erik Shell.

CALL FOR PAPERS
FIRST CIRCULAR
XXVIth International Conference of 2017

The  XXVIth International Conference and the VIIIth International Bilingual Summer Seminar on XENOPHON, organized by the OLYMPIC CENTER FOR PHILOSOPHY AND CULTURE (OCPC) , will take place in Ancient Olympia and Neochorion -Zacharo, Greece, July 28-31 , 2017 .
The topics of the Conference (A) and  the Seminar (B)  are:
A. PHILOSOPHY AND THE ARTS WITH AN EMPHASIS
(1) ON A HOLISTIC APPROACH
AND
(2) ON THE CONTRIBUTION OF
N. KAZANTZAKIS AND J.P. ANTON TO PHILOSOPHY AND THE ARTS
B. XENOPHON’S VIEWS ON PHILOSOPHY, THE ARTS AND HOLISM
Ι. The Conference will explore  a variety of views on:
     
• Philosophy and The Arts:  Comparative, Evaluative and Holistic Approach
• N. Kazantzakis’s Contribution to Philosophy and the Arts
• J. P. Anton’s Contribution to Philosophy and the Arts

DEADLINES:

April 30, 2017:  Abstract is due (300-500 words)

June 30, 2017: Full Paper is due (2.500 words)

*** In case the abstracts or papers are not acceptable the authors will be promptly informed.

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View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 04/12/2017 - 8:57am by Erik Shell.

Medusa

This article was originally published in Amphora 12.1. It has been edited slightly to adhere to current SCS blog conventions.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 04/10/2017 - 10:11pm by Tom Kohn.

The SCS, with help from Ph.D.-granting institutions, has compiled a list of the current In-Progress dissertations as of this academic year (2016-2017). The page will be updated as information of new or completed dissertations comes in to the office.

You can view the new page here.

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 04/10/2017 - 11:04am by Erik Shell.

Crete/Patras Ancient Emotions Conference II
Medical understandings of emotions in antiquity

University of Patras, December 8-10 2017

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 04/10/2017 - 9:51am by Erik Shell.

NEH Logo

April, 2017

Below is a list of the most recent NEH grantees and their Classically-themed projects. The NEH helps fund a number of SCS initiatives, and their support affects the field of Classics at a national and local level.

Grantees

  • Matthew Simonton (Arizona State University, West Campus) - "Demagogues and Popular Culture in Ancient Greece
  • Valencia Community College (Directed by Sean Lake) - "Tragedy, Catharsis, and Reconciliation: Vocies from Ancient and Modern Warfare"
  • Kristina Killgrove (University of West Florida) - "Death comes to Oplontis: Recording and Analyzing Skeletons of Victims of Mt. Vesuvius (79 AD)
  • Touchstones Discussion Project, Inc. (Directed by Howard Zeiderman) - "Completing the Odyssey: A Journey Home"
  • Lofton Durham (Western Michigan University) - "Jacques Milet's Destruction of Troy and the Making of the French Nation"
  • Thomas Keeline (Washington University) - "Latin Textual Scholarship in the Digital Age: An Open-Access Critical Edition of Ovid's Ibis"
  • Aquila Theatre Company Inc. (Two Projects, both directed by Peter Meineck) - "The Warrior Chorus: Our Trojan War" and "Our Trojan War: Ancient and Modern Expressions"
  • Megan Nutzman (Old Dominion University) - "Ritual Cures Among Cristians, Jews, and Pagans in Roman and Late Antique Palestine

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View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Thu, 04/06/2017 - 8:09am by Erik Shell.

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SCS Announcements
Please be aware that the deadline for individual abstracts for the 2018 annua
Calls for Papers
THE IMPACT OF LEARNING GREEK, HEBREW, AND ‘ORIENTAL’ LANGUAGES ON SCH
Awards and Fellowships
We are delighted to announce the following winners of the 2017 Pedagogy Award
Awards and Fellowships
Donald Mastronarde, SCS Member and Vice President for Publications and Resear

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