CFP: Globalizing Ovid: Shanghai 2017

An International Conference in Commemoration of the Bimillennium of Ovid’s Death

Guangqi International Center for Scholars of Shanghai Normal University May 31–June 2, 2017 Jointly sponsored by the Chinese National Social Science Foundation, Shanghai Normal University, and Dickinson College Keynote speakers:

  • Michael von Albrecht (Universität Heidelberg)
  • Maurizio Bettini (Università di Siena)
  • John Miller (University of Virginia)
  • Alison Sharrock (University of Manchester)
  • Gareth Williams (Columbia University)
  • Wei Zhang (Fudan University)

Welcome addresses:

  • Fritz-Heiner Mutschler (Universität Dresden/Peking University)
  • Yang Huang (Fudan University)

Concluding addresses:

  • Laurel Fulkerson (Florida State University)

DEADLINE FOR THE SUBMISSION OF ABSTRACTS: April 30, 2016

 

Why Shanghai?

One may be surprised to learn that this is not the first time that an anniversary of a Latin poet is commemorated in China. 1930, the Bimillennium of Vergil’s birth, represented a watershed in the reception of Vergil and Roman literature in China. Aeneid Book I and Eclogues IV and VIII were translated into Chinese for the first time. The translator praised Vergil’s “modern” spirit: his critical attitude toward Empire, his questioning of the cost of civilization, his doubts of the value of progress, and his portrayal of the loneliness of his main characters. In 1932, well-known poet Dai Wangshu translated Ovid’s Ars Amatoria into vernacular Chinese prose based on Ovide: L'Art d'Aimer in the Collection Budé. These translations were both products of and participants in the Chinese exploration of modernity and a “New Culture,” a process that involved a full scale reexamination of a wide range of issues, from the status of the Confucian canon, relationships with authority, modes of heroism, gender roles and sexuality, to ways of expressing desire and emotion. It was only after a long hiatus that complete translations of Ovid’s Metamorphoses and Vergil’s Aeneid appeared in 1984 and 1987 respectively, both created by Yang Zhouhan (1915–1989), working from the original Latin and various English translations. Today there is a remarkable surge in interest in both Chinese and Western classics in China. Latin literature is gaining momentum at a speed faster than one could have imagined a generation ago. In 2015 the Chinese National Social Science Foundation announced “Translating the Complete Corpus of Ovid’s poetry into Chinese with Commentaries” (PI: Jinyu Liu) as one of the major projects to fund in the next five years. With this initiative, Ovid’s Fasti and exile poetry will be translated into Chinese for the first time, his other poems will be retranslated, and comprehensive commentaries will accompany the translations of all of Ovid’s poems for the first time. Consilium resque locusque dabunt (Tristia I.1.92) This conference serves as an opportunity not only to pay tribute to Ovid, but also to promote cross-cultural conversations about the globalization of the Greco-Roman Classics. The conference invites papers that represent the most recent developments in the Ovidian scholarship—philological, textual, critical, literary, and historical—as well as contributions that explore perspectives from comparativism, translingualism, and postclassicism to address larger issues of translating and interpreting the Classics in a globalizing world. These two strands of themes should not be perceived as being either isolated from or in competition against each other, especially if scholars and translators of Ovid are understood as participants in assigning meanings to his work. The conference intends to bring together scholars and translators to explore the dynamic processes of selection, tension, and negotiation that have been integral to the making and interpreting of Classical canon, including Ovid. How has Ovid been taught, disseminated, transmitted, and evaluated in Roman antiquity and in other cultures? If the viability of the Greco-Roman Classics in the postclassical eras, and in the non-Western contexts hinges on the willingness of the host cultures to assign new meanings to them, what may motivate that “willingness,” and through whose agency? What are those new meanings? Where and how are they being worked out and developed? What translation strategies have been applied to Ovid’s poetry in different locales and languages, and for what audiences? What are the challenges of translating Ovid in cultures with their own vibrant but different poetic traditions, and literary culture concerning themes of love, abandonment, transformation, and exile? How and where are Classics changed by their interaction with different host cultures?

Topics and abstract submissions: The conference will include plenary addresses, individual paper presentations, as well as roundtables organized by project team members and the board of referees (see below). In accordance with the dual function of the conference both to highlight current scholarship and trends in thinking on Ovid and to consider modes of cross-cultural reception, comparison, and translation, we provide the following list to illustrate the range of questions and topics in which the conference is interested. It is by no means an exclusive or restrictive list:

  • Amor: Force of destruction?
  • Emotions in Ovid
  • The dearth of same-sex relationships in Ovid
  • Intertextuality in Ovid: What’s new?
  • The Ovidian aesthetics
  • Ovid’s literary persona(e)
  • Ovid’s lieux de mémoire
  • The psychology of exile in the Ovidian corpus
  • The human and Roman past(s) in Ovid
  • Ovid in provinces and Roman imperialism
  • Locus urbanus versus locus barbarus in Ovid
  • Seduction in ancient literature: a comparative examination
  • Tales of Transformation compared (within Metamorphoses, across genres, and/or across cultures)
  • The Ovidian corpus: critical editions
  • Teaching Ovid in Antiquity and/or the modern world
  • Translating Ovid (and Classics in general) in a Global Context
  • Visualizing Ovid
  • Post-classical Ovid (reception and adaptation in all genres)
  • Commentary tradition and digital commentary

We welcome submissions from advanced doctoral students and scholars of all seniorities. Please send brief vitae and proposals (300 words excluding bibliography) for 25-minute papers by April 30, 2016 to Jinyu Liu, HH 117, Department of Classical Studies, DePauw University, Greencastle, IN 46135, USA, or email: both OvidShanghai2017@hotmail.com and jliu@depauw.edu. Abstract submissions will be evaluated by a board of seven referees, whose names are listed below, and the results will be announced by June 1, 2016:

  • Christopher Francese (Dickinson College, USA)
  • Laurel Fulkerson (Florida State University, USA)
  • Steven Green (Yale-NUS, Singapore)
  • Jinyu Liu (DePauw University/Shanghai Normal University, USA/China)
  • Lisa Mignone (Brown University, USA)
  • Bobby Xinyue (University of Warwick, UK)
  • Wei Zhang (Fudan University, China)

Publication plan:

Selected contributions will be translated into Chinese, and published in either a collected volume or in Chinese academic journals. The authors will retain copyright to the non-Chinese versions of their articles. The possibility of publishing the conference proceedings in English with a European or American publisher will also be explored.

Organizers:

  • Heng Chen (Shanghai Normal University)
  • Christopher Francese (Dickinson College)
  • Jinyu Liu (DePauw University/Shanghai Normal University)

*Please send all inquiries to Professor Jinyu Liu at jliu@depauw.edu. Join us as we make history!

Image: Robinet Testard, Ipsipile scrive a Giasone (Source: Folia Magazine)

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Southeast boundary marker of the Tritopatreion

Attic Inscriptions Online (AIO) presents translations of Attic inscriptions alongside cross-references to Greek texts, images, and notes. The website is the creation of Stephen Lambert and is affiliated with the Europeana Eagle Project. As of March 2017, AIO contains over 1,000 inscriptions with the eventual aim to provide translations of the 20,000+ inscriptions originating from Athens and Attica. The majority of the translations are by Lambert himself, with the remaining texts translated by a team of collaborators.

The majority of translations on the site come from the most recent IG II3 publications focusing on laws and decrees from the fourth to the second centuries BCE, with a gradually increasing number of notable inscriptions from the fifth century BCE. At present, there is little coverage of the archaic or imperial periods, although one imagines that this will change as the site continues to grow (information on how inscriptions are prioritized for inclusion can be found in the About section of the site).

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 05/22/2017 - 12:00am by Alan Sheppard.

In Memoriam: Garrett G. Fagan

(Submitted by Stephen Wheeler, Department of Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies, The Pennsylvania State University)

The untimely death two months ago of Garrett George Fagan (January 15, 1963 -- March 11, 2017), the Irish-American ancient historian best known for his social histories of Roman bathing and the spectacles of the Roman arena, is a great loss to the community of classical studies. A long-time member of the SCS and AIA, Garrett contributed unstintingly to the programs of the joint annual meetings and promoted a wider public understanding and appreciation of the ancient world. Fellow ancient historians have been deprived of a resourceful collaborator in research projects; students and lifelong learners, of an inspiring teacher.

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Wed, 05/17/2017 - 11:40am by Erik Shell.

Conversational Ancient Greek

The Polis Institute for Classical Languages, under the sponsorship of the Classical Association of Massachusetts and the Department of Classical and Religious Studies at the University of Massachusetts Boston, will conduct, for the first time, an intensive, three-week course in active ancient Greek this summer.  The lead instructor will be Prof. Christophe Rico of the Polis Institute.

The course will take place at Bridgewater State University (June 11th to the 30th), entailing 90 hours of instruction for $1,400 in tuition.  On-campus housing and meals are available.

Prof. James Dobreff (james.dobreff@umb.edu) should be contacted for more information about the program.

For more, see:  sites.google.com/view/activegreek/

---

(Photo: "Empty Boardroom" by Reynermedia, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Tue, 05/16/2017 - 3:09pm by Erik Shell.

"Empty Theatre (almost)"by Kevin Jaako, licensed under CC BY 2.0

CALL FOR ACTORS, DESIGNERS AND OTHER CREATIVE TYPES!

for

The Arsonists (a morality play without a moral)

by Max Frisch

Translated by Alistair Beaton

Fri, Jan 5th, 2018

SCS Annual Meeting, Boston

Directed by Laura & Mike Lippman

This year we will continue the tradition of CAMP sponsored productions with a staged reading of The Arsonists (a morality play without a moral) by Max Frisch, translated by Alistair Beaton.

View full article. | Posted in Performances on Tue, 05/16/2017 - 2:06pm by Erik Shell.

Call for Papers:

Wilderness, Frontiers, and New Worlds in Antiquity

Biennial Classics Graduate Student Conference

New York University

November 4, 2017

Keynote: Prof. Andrew Laird (Brown University)

Unfamiliar, unexplored, and unsettled places captivated the ancient imagination and were of pressing importance not only to poets and prose writers of every genre, but also to merchants, militaries, and governing bodies enticed by the prospects of new sites for trading, settling, and conquering. There has been a swell of critical interest recently in the topics of borders and boundaries in the ancient world, as part of the increased scholarly attention to space over the past few decades. Our conference is interested in spaces beyond borders, and we aim to explore ancient encounters with wilderness, frontiers, and unknown lands.

Possible topics include:

•   Visual representations of wilderness and extreme environments

•   Representations in ancient texts of the landscape, weather, and human adaptation in unexplored lands

•   Narrations and theorizations of journeys undersea, into the sky, or below the earth

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 05/15/2017 - 9:33am by Erik Shell.

Podcast listening is more popular than ever. Data from the large Infinite Dial survey shows steady yearly growth in the share of adults over 12 who have listened to at least one podcast. In 2016, 36% reported having done so, for an estimated 96 million people nationwide. The time is therefore right for classicists to embrace this medium for public engagement.

While podcasting takes time and preparation and may have a steep learning curve, it is very rewarding. Research interests come alive in a new way when you create and share your ideas via podcasting. Listener responses will help you develop your ideas in new directions. Podcasting also breaks down academia’s walls, creating a wider audience and inviting the public to see what scholars do and why it matters.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 05/15/2017 - 12:00am by Alison Innes.

Call for Papers
Deadline for Submissions is April 1st 2018

KOINON: The International Journal of Classical Numismatic Studies

A New Annual Journal Published by the Societatis De Tauro Cum Facie Humana

General Editor:
Nicholas J. Molinari, US
njmolinari@gmail.com

Editorial Board

Shawn Caza, CA
Alberto Campana, IT
Victor Clark, US
Curtis Clay, US
Phil Davis, US
Tjaart de Beer, CH
Mark Fox, US
József Géza Kiss, HU
David MacDonald, US
Gavin Richardson, US
Martin Rowe, SE
David Sear, US
Andrew Short, CA
Nicola Sisci, IT
Lloyd W. H. Taylor, AU
Joseph Uphoff, US
John Zielinski, US

Papers concerning virtually any topic of ancient coinage are welcome, including papers on non-western coinages.  Reviews and short notes are also encouraged, as are translations of important excerpts from antiquarian works. Special preference will be given to papers that are engaging to a fairly wide audience (Art Historians, Classicists, Archaeologists, Historians, etc.). 

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 05/11/2017 - 11:38am by Erik Shell.

Detail of Dying Eurydice, Charles-François Lebœuf (1826), Galerie Colbert, Paris, France

This article was originally published in Amphora (12.1). It has been edited slightly to adhere to current SCS blog conventions.

The story is familiar. Musician marries the love of his life; on their wedding day, she dies. He grieves until he wills his way into the Underworld and is allowed to retrieve her on one condition, which he violates. Thus, even the theme is the same: the fallibility of the human condition and the inability of art to triumph over the persistence of suffering and the finality of death. Nor is Eurydice a strident feminist with a point to prove, after centuries of silent existence as nothing more than a catalyst for the erotic narrative that is the myth of Orpheus and Eurydice. For contemporary American playwright Sarah Ruhl, Eurydice is foremost a daughter who learns the hard way that all relationships are constructed of words that cannot always withstand the insistent tensions and demands of parents and spouses. Since language is so deficient, Ruhl deploys light, space, distance, and depth to hone the banal into razor-sharp instruments capable of exposing emotional vulnerabilities most audience members would rather not admit existed. For Ruhl, in the theater space must yield to imagination, not, as in film, the other way around.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 05/08/2017 - 9:42pm by Victoria Emma Pagán.

(This is a message from the SCS Annual Fund Committee, sent to members on May 8th, 2017)

We’re looking for a few good classicists.

Actually, we’re looking for quite a few good classicists, those who will constitute the next generation of our profession. It’s our job to foster scholars who are entering the field, including those in contingent faculty positions and graduate students giving papers at the Annual Meeting. Many of these scholars hope to be in Boston next January, ready to experience the full professional and social dimensions of our vocation. Their work and their presence at the Annual Meeting will enrich our own future.

They just need a little help, and the SCS Annual Fund can provide it.

The Annual Fund supports contingent faculty and graduate students through travel grants to the Annual Meeting. Thanks to the generosity of our members, over $25,000 in travel grants have been awarded over the past two years. But the demand is still greater than the supply; last year, the SCS was able to fund only half of the requests from graduate students. Your gifts also support undergraduate minority scholarships, TLL Fellowships, and the Lionel Pearson Fellowship, and in addition to keeping down the costs of the Annual Meeting for everyone, they ensure that the Placement Service is free for all member applicants.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 05/08/2017 - 12:58pm by Erik Shell.

Between Philosophy and Rhetoric
May 13 – 14, 2017
NYU Philosophy/Classics

Anyone intending to attend the workshop should let Laura Viidebaum (lv40@nyu.edu) know by *Monday, May 8th* the latest, so that they have an idea of numbers and can plan accordingly.

organizers: Laura Viidebaum (NYU), Toomas Lott (NYU/Tartu)
location: NYU Classics department, 100 Washington Square East, Room 503

Saturday, May 13th
9.15-9.30 Coffee, introduction and welcome

9.30 - 11.10am
Usha Nathan (Columbia) ‘Why persuade with pathos?’
Response: Iakovos Vasiliou (CUNY)

11.10 - 11.20 Coffee break

11.20am - 1.00pm
Joel Mann (St Norbert) ‘Rediscovering “Hippocrates”: the rhetoric of skepticism in περὶ φύσιος ἀνθρώπου’
Response: Calloway Scott (NYU)

1.00 - 2.30pm Lunch

2.30 - 4.10pm
Richard Hunter (Cambridge) ‘Listening to the Sirens’
Response: Mirjam Kotwick (New School)

4.10 - 4.20 Coffee break

4.20 - 6pm
Edward Schiappa (MIT) ‘Isocrates, Pragmatism, and the Endless Mediation of Rhetoric & Philosophy’
Response: Colin King (Providence College)

7pm Dinner and drinks

Sunday, May 14th
9.15-9.30 Coffee

9.30 - 11.10am
Nancy Worman (Barnard) ‘Philosophizing embodiment in Aristotle's Poetics and Rhetoric’
Response: Nicholas Rynearson (NYU)

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 05/08/2017 - 12:08pm by Erik Shell.

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