CFP: Greco-Roman Antiquity and White Supremacy

Call for Abstracts: Greco-Roman Antiquity and White Supremacy

Society for Classical Studies Annual Meeting, Jan 7–10, 2021

Curtis Dozier, director of Pharos: Doing Justice to the Classics (pharosclassics.vassar.edu), invites the submission of abstracts on any aspect of the relationship of Greco-Roman Antiquity and White Supremacy. Selected abstracts will form a proposal for a panel on the topic to be held at the 2021 Society for Classical Studies annual meeting in Chicago, IL (Jan 7–10, 2021). If the SCS Program committee accepts our proposed panel, the Vassar College Department of Greek and Roman Studies will offer panelists who do not have tenured or tenure-track positions a $500 stipend toward the cost of attending the conference. Pharos is also offering a research service for those interested in preparing abstracts but who prefer not to visit White Supremacist websites (on which see below).

At the 2020 SCS meeting, twenty classical scholars gathered for a round table discussion about the ways the discipline of Classics has been and continues to be complicit in White Supremacy. A summary of this discussion is available here: https://bit.ly/2U6TD1L. This disciplinary conversation forms a counterpart to the many examples of Greco-Roman Antiquity being appropriated by White Supremacists outside of Classics that have been documented on the website Pharos: Doing Justice to the Classics (https://pages.vassar.edu/pharos/white-nationalism-white-supremacy/). These appropriations are, in a sense, easier to confront than the implication of our discipline in racist power, because they locate racism “outside” the discipline of Classics. At the same time their blatant racism throws into relief the racial politics of many idealizing narratives about the ancient world that underpin traditional justifications for the study of Classics and continue to be prominent in the popular imagination.

This panel seeks to bring together analyses of both dimensions of the relationship between Greco-Roman Antiquity and White Supremacy: both the historical complicity of the discipline in promoting, as Critical Race Theorist Francis Lee Ansley puts it, “conscious and unconscious ideas of white superiority and entitlement,” and the ongoing use of Greco-Roman antiquity by overt White Supremacists as a source of legitimacy for their politics. Of particular interest are abstracts that discuss both aspects, but submissions treating one or the other are welcome as well. It is desirable, but not required, that abstracts also make recommendations for a way forward.

Possible approaches include:

  • Situating contemporary appropriations of Greco-Roman antiquity by White Supremacists in the history of the discipline of Classical Studies
  • Examining the role of outdated classical scholarship and outdated conceptions of the study of Classics in the propagation of hateful articulations of ancient history
  • Evaluating differences between current, specialized understandings of the ancient world and public perceptions of the ancient world in relation to the utility of Greco-Roman Antiquity for hate groups
  • Interrogating how the prestige of the “Classical” can often be put to hateful ends without historical inaccuracy, as when, for example, a xenophobic site cites Periclean citizenship requirements as a model to be emulated
  • Connecting the appropriation of Greco-Roman antiquity by hate groups to current disciplinary conversations around inclusion and diversity in Classics
  • Discussing the moral and ethical responsibilities of specialists when faced with such appropriations, and what limits, if any, there are to those responsibilities

Recognizing that many scholars may not wish to visit White Supremacist websites or obtain White Supremacist literature, Pharos is offering a research service to those preparing abstracts: prospective panelists may submit topics/authors/works they are interested in discussing in relation to White Supremacy and Pharos will return references to that topic (if any exist) from the major hate sites and print publications in our database. These will be provided as archived links that do not generate traffic for the sites in question. It is hoped that this service will allow a greater range of specialists to prepare abstracts for this panel.  Requests for preliminary research should be sent by email to pharosclassics@vassar.edu by the deadline listed below.

Timeline and Deadlines:

1) Requests for preliminary research should be made by email to pharosclassics@vassar.edu by 9AM EST on Monday, February 17th, 2020.

2) We will attempt to return research service results by March 1st.

3)  500 word abstracts are due at 5PM EDT Friday, March 13th, 2020. These should be submitted by email to pharosclassics@vassar.edu and should adhere to the SCS’s “Guidelines for Authors of Abstracts” (https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/guidelines-authors-abstracts

4) Notifications of acceptance will be made by Monday, March 30th, 2020.   At this point accepted panelists will need to provide a current SCS Member number (as required for the Program Committee submission).

5) Proposal incorporating accepted abstracts due to the Program Committee in early April, 2020.

6) Notification of acceptance by the Program Committee in June, 2020.

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(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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David C. Young, Professor Emeritus of Classics at the University of Florida (http://web.classics.ufl.edu/faculty/faculty_o/young.html), died February 5, 2013. An internationally recognized scholar of Pindar and a pioneer in the history of the Olympic games, David was recognized with a Lifetime Distinguished Scholar Award in 2007 by the International Society of Olympic Historians. He taught at the University of California, Santa Barbara (1963-1989) and was a visiting professor at Stanford (1974, 1976) and the University of Michigan (1973, 1983) before joining the faculty at the University of Florida where he was a beloved teacher who inspired students for twenty years.

The Department of Classics at the University of Florida will post information here http://web.classics.ufl.edu/index.html regarding a memorial service to be held in his honor in Gainesville, FL. Please do not hesitate to contact us if we may assist you to attend.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 02/07/2013 - 4:01pm by Adam Blistein.

As noted earlier, Craig Gibson has been appointed Editor of Transactions effective January 5, 2014.  However, he will handle new submissions effective immediately.  Please send all submissions electronically to tapa@uiowa.edu, following TAPA guidelines.  Katharina Volk will remain the official Editor through 2013 and in charge of producing this year's issues (143.1 and 2).

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Sun, 02/03/2013 - 4:07pm by Adam Blistein.

As Chair of the Search Committee, I am happy to report that Professor Craig Gibson of the University of Iowa has accepted our invitation to become the next Editor of the Transactions of the American Philological Association.  Professor Gibson is a distinguished and very productive scholar of ancient literature and its intersections with other aspects of ancient culture.  His term as Editor will run from January 5, 2014 to January 7, 2018.  An announcement concerning the transition of responsibility from current Editor Katharina Volk to Professor Gibson and protocol for submission of manuscripts will soon be published on the web site and in the Association Newsletter.

I want to thank the other members of the Search Committee (John Bodel, Jeff Henderson, Chris Kraus, and Adam Blistein) for their assistance in the completion of this successful search.  I also very much appreciate the interest that the Committee saw from the other highly qualified candidates for this position.  Finally, we are grateful to Department of Classics of the University of Iowa for its support of the arrangements necessary to enable Professor Gibson to accept this position. 

Michael Gagarin
Vice President for Publications and Research

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 01/29/2013 - 7:48pm by Adam Blistein.

After three weeks, the 144th Annual Meeting in Seattle is receding into history, and it is a good moment to take stock of what a successful meeting it proved to be.  The host department from UW-Seattle, led by Ruby Blondell and Alain Gowing, did a superb job, and we thank them all for helping to make the Meeting such a success.  Even the Northwest weather cooperated to make Seattle a great venue for us: on my fourth visit to Seattle I finally got to see Mt. Rainier.  There was a tremendous program of panels and performances, even if your officers, including the President, were unable to emerge from their seclusion in committee rooms to enjoy more than a small fraction of the riches on offer.

In the Plenary Session, we honored a remarkable group of teachers and scholars for their achievements. From the point of view of our Association’s history and future, the most significant moment in the Plenary Session was the celebration of the triumphant conclusion of the Gateway Campaign, steered to its harbor by President Jeffrey Henderson.  It was a delight to see the Campaign Committee members being honored, and to see Distinguished Service Awards presented to the three visionary and energetic APA members who provided such outstanding leadership from the beginning to the end of the Campaign: Ward W. Briggs, David H. Porter, and Michael C.J. Putnam.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 01/29/2013 - 7:46pm by Adam Blistein.

"Tools of the Trade" was conceived by Lowell Edmunds as a bibliographic guide for graduate students and others interested in furthering their knowledge of the Roman world. When the expansion of scholarly resources and the growing capabilities of web-based publication made a second edition desirable, Professor Edmunds decided to divide the project into thirteen discrete bibliographies, each with its own editor/compiler.At this point, the project was passed on to Sander M. Goldberg of UCLA, who has assumed responsibility for editing the final documents and posting them on this site. The content and form of each bibliography has been determined by the subject editor, who is identified in the heading for each document.

Download "Tools of the Trade".

View full article. | Posted in Websites and Resources on Sat, 01/12/2013 - 1:02pm by .

A short conference organised by the School of History, Classics and Archaeology, University of Edinburgh, UK.

Date:  Friday 15th-Saturday 16th March, 2012

The starting point for this conference is the lively and controversial figure of Caesarius, bishop of Arles from 502-542. Both Caesarius and the time in which he lived have been seen as emblematic of the cusp between the ancient and medieval eras. This conference brings together scholars from diverse backgrounds in order to throw light on this fascinating figure, an eventful period of late antique history, and the rich material culture of southern Gaul.

Friday 15th March Opening Lecture, 5pm

William Klingshirn (Catholic University of America): ‘Caesarius of Arles: 1970-2042: retrospect and prospect’

Saturday 16th March Day Conference (9am-6pm)

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Thu, 01/10/2013 - 2:08pm by .

Local newspapers published articles about the two winners of this year's Precollegiate Teaching Award.  The Seattle Times published this story about Nora Macdonald just before the annual meeting in that city.  The Delaware County Daily Times carried an article about Lee T. Pearcy.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 01/09/2013 - 6:43pm by Adam Blistein.

Dear APA Friends:

I have learned from close colleagues in my field of Hellenistic poetry at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki of the dire situation of their resources: they have no funds whatever to buy books for their library. For one of the prominent European departments in Classics, this is a truly difficult situation: senior professors and young scholars alike are deprived of access to the most recent scholarship and bibliographies, namely our newly published books. The situation is particularly hard on the graduate students, of which the department has a flourishing number. I have sent them copies of the costly new Callimachus volumes in the past year, but feel I really should try to do more, which is why I appeal to all of us as a community. Please consider donating any new books that you can spare, perhaps gratis or author discounted copies. I am aware that there are many competing demands on this resource, from significant omaggi to the convenience (often significant) of having a copy for one’s home study and university office. But given the gravity of their situation, I appeal to all of us to reconsider our priorities at this time: remember, ὑπá½²ρ πάντων – our debt to Greece is not a small one.

Packages may be sent to:

Prof. Ioannis Tzifopoulos, Chairman

or

Prof. Aimilios Mavroudis, Head of Department

View full article. | Posted in General Announcements on Mon, 12/31/2012 - 6:59pm by .

For the upcoming annual meeting in Seattle rooms at the convention rate ($139/night plus tax) are no longer available at the Sheraton Seattle Hotel.  The convention rate is still available at the Grand Hyatt Seattle Hotel.  The Hyatt is less than a city block away from the Washington State Convention Center where most sessions take place and almost as close to the Sheraton where many committee meetings and receptions will be located.  The institutions conducting job interviews who have rented their own suites are all located in the Hyatt.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 12/18/2012 - 5:05pm by Adam Blistein.

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