CFP: Greek Literary Topographies in the Roman Imperial World

GREEK LITERARY TOPOGRAPHIES IN THE ROMAN IMPERIAL WORLD

The Pennsylvania State University, 16-18 April 2021

Workshop Organizers:

Anna Peterson, Penn State

Janet Downie, UNC-Chapel Hill

Keynote Speaker:

Jason König, University of St. Andrews

Confirmed Speakers:

Pavlos Avlamis

Artemis Brod

William Hutton

Bryant Kirkland

Kate Gilhuly

Karen ní Mheallaigh

Estelle Strazdins

As spatial theorists like Lefebvre, Foucault, and Soja have shown, space is not static, but dynamic – both reflecting and engendering processes of interpretation and cultural construction. By extension, in a literary context, space does not simply provide the backdrop against which events “take place.” Rather, literary topographies create relationships – both within the text and beyond it – connecting individuals to one another and to shared social worlds, both real and imagined. For scholars of Classics, this means that the representation of space in ancient literature offers another way of understanding the shape of ancient society, its political, religious and cultural concerns. There is now a considerable body of scholarship on the literary topographies of the city of Rome and on the geography of empire in Latin literature, as well as important work on spatial perspectives in Greek literature of the Archaic, Classical, and Hellenistic periods. Prominent examples of the latter include Alex Purves’ Space and Time in Ancient Greek Narrative, Kate Gilhuly’s Erotic Geographies in Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, William Thalmann’s Apollonius of Rhodes and the Spaces of Hellenism and Irene de Jong’s volume, Space in Ancient Greek Literature.

This workshop aims to broaden the discussion to include Greek literature of the Imperial period. While space has been explored in relation to explicitly topographical writers (e.g., Pausanias, Strabo) and in the context of the Greek novel, spatial descriptions outside of these genres have been treated as primarily as scene-setting devices or ekphrastic excursus. Beginning from the essential questions of how authors of the imperial period evoke different spaces and why they describe them in the ways that they do, this workshop will interrogate the relationship between lived space, society, and power and its depiction in literature.

Participants are encouraged to think about these issues as they relate not just to explicitly topographical writers but also to the rhetorical, philosophical, and fictional literature of the period. We are interested both in papers that probe the specifics of a given author or text and that think more theoretically about spatiality at this time. In addition, we also invite approaches that draw comparisons to other periods of literature – whether earlier or later – and to other traditions (e.g. Latin, Jewish and Christian).

Workshop Format:

Participants will pre-circulate papers at the end of February 2021, and the workshop will include brief presentations with formal responses and discussion. We are currently planning for a hybrid format, including both in-person and online participation, so that we can adapt as necessary to institutional and personal circumstances relating to travel and gathering.

Abstract Submission:

Please submit abstracts of no more than 800 words (including bibliography), as well as a CV, by 15 September 2020 to either of the Workshop Organizers by email: Anna Peterson, aip12@psu.edu; Janet Downie, jdownie@email.unc.edu. Notification of acceptance will be given in early October.

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Logo of the Women's Classical Caucus

In Part 3 of our guest series for the SCS Blog, the Women’s Classical Caucus (WCC) invites you to celebrate the winner of its 2020-21 Public Scholarship Award: Peopling the Past, a grassroots group of Canadian archaeologists and art historians of the ancient Mediterranean who have created resources accessible to audiences of all ages.

View full article. | Posted in on Tue, 03/09/2021 - 2:08pm by Caroline Cheung.

Gorgias/Gorgias

The Sicilian Orator and the Platonic Dialogue

Exedra Mediterranean Center

Syracuse, Sicily, 23-26 November, 2021

with a pre-conference seminar on selections of his writings in Greek (November 22-23) and an excursion to the archaeological site and museum of Leontini, November 27.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Tue, 03/09/2021 - 1:49pm by Erik Shell.

Sex, Rage, & Change:Feminist Adaptation of Ovid’s Metamorphoses

a public conversation with Nina MacLaughlin, Paisley Rekdal, and Stephanie McCarter

4 p.m. CST Thursday, April 8, 2021

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Tue, 03/09/2021 - 1:39pm by Erik Shell.

Society for Ancient Mediterranean Religions

SPRING LECTURE SERIES 2021

Après le deluge: plagues, propaganda, and the mobility of the divine

Please join SAMR members in a lecture series this Spring devoted to the exploration of ancient ritual responses to questions that have filled our minds, hearts and news feeds over an extraordinary year. Four speakers have will explore contemporary issues, including disease, identity, mobility and disempowered cultural groups through the lenses of ancient ritual practice.  All are welcome -mark your calendars!

All sessions will be held at this Zoom address: https://pugetsound-edu.zoom.us/j/93329292263

March 11, at 12 noon EST

“Osor-Hapi: North African Cult Paradigms during the Hellenistic and Roman Periods.”

Dr. Vivian A. Laughlin

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 03/01/2021 - 11:49am by Erik Shell.

The second iteration of the conference, Res Difficiles 2.0 Difficult Conversations in Classics (ResDiff2), will be held March 20, 2021; registration is now

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 03/01/2021 - 11:46am by Erik Shell.

The Perception of Climate and Nature in Ancient Societies

International Online Conference

14th  May 2021

Organised by  Classical Students Association of the John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin

Call for Papers

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 03/01/2021 - 11:43am by Erik Shell.
Goddess Demeter and her daughter Persephone give grain to Triptolemos and teach him the art of agriculture. Marble Relief from Eleusis. ca. 430 BCE. Roman copy. ca. 27 BCE – 14 CE. Photo courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

The Classics Everywhere initiative, launched by the SCS in 2019, supports projects that seek to engage communities worldwide with the study of Greek and Roman antiquity in new and meaningful ways. Most of the projects funded take place in the US and Canada, though the initiative is growing and has funded projects in the UK, Italy, Greece, Belgium, Ghana, and Puerto Rico. This post highlights projects that foster engagement and education for school-aged children and young adults from California to Canada, Chicago to New York.

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 02/26/2021 - 9:15am by .

The Executive Committee of the SCS has issued the following statement:

For several years, serious issues have arisen concerning online communications within the classics community. The SCS reminds its members to respect the dignity of one another in professional and private communications. These communications include, inter alia, social media posts and direct messages, private emails, and messages posted to email listservs. In view of these concerns the SCS Professional Matters Division is preparing guidelines for social media and other online communications.

Approved 2/25/2021

View full article. | Posted in Public Statements on Thu, 02/25/2021 - 4:44pm by Helen Cullyer.

Summer 2021 Election Slate

The 2020-2021 SCS Nominating Committee, co-chaired by Laurel Fulkerson and Celia Schultz, has worked hard through the late Fall 2020 and early 2021. The Committee is pleased to present the following slate of candidates for election in Summer 2021. All candidates listed below have agreed to stand. SCS will publish candidate statements in the late spring or early summer and online voting will begin as usual on or around August 1.

President-Elect (one to be elected)

Lesley Dean-Jones

Matthew Roller 

Financial Trustee (one to be elected)

Daniel Berman

Joseph Farrell

Vice President for Education (one to be elected)

Dani Bostick

Teresa Ramsby

Directors (two to be elected)

(one candidate, Yurie Hong, has withdrawn)

Young Richard Kim

Nandini Pandey

Bronwen Wickkiser

Craig Williams

Nominating Committee (two to be elected)

(one candidate, Akira Yatsuhashi, has withdrawn)

Ronnie Ancona

Pramit Chaudhuri

Joel Christensen

Program Committee (one to be elected)

Rosa Andújar

Denise Demetriou

Goodwin Committee (two to be elected)

Rhiannon Ash

Constanze Guthenke

Yopie Prins

Phiroze Vasunia 

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 02/22/2021 - 1:45pm by Erik Shell.
Banner of the Women's Classical Caucus, est. 1972

In Part 2 of our guest series for the SCS Blog, the Women’s Classical Caucus (WCC) invites you to celebrate the winner of its 2020–2021 Leadership Award: Suzanne Lye, Assistant Professor of Classics at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The award recognizes Dr. Lye’s extraordinary leadership and initiative in establishing, administering, and fundraising for the SCS-WCC Covid-19 Relief Fund. Since April 2020, this emergency microgrant fund has distributed no-strings-attached awards of up to $500 to North American classicists in need.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 02/22/2021 - 10:27am by Caroline Cheung.

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