CFP: Hospitality and Xenophobia in the Graeco Roman World

XenoiHospitality and Xenophobia in the Graeco Roman World

12th Annual Graduate Student Conference
March 15, 2019
The Graduate Center of the City University of New York

Keynote Speaker: Rebecca Futo Kennedy, Denison University

The PhD/MA Program in Classics at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York invites graduate students in Classics or related fields to submit abstracts for papers that explore the topics of hospitality and xenophobia in the Graeco-Roman world.

Hospitality is commonly recognized as an important value in the ancient Greek world. Xenia - or guest friendship - was a political and religious institution as well as an instrument of diplomatic relations. Through practices of supplications, strangers and foreigners demanded to be received in aristocratic houses or in whole cities. On the other hand, there is an emerging debate about the existence of xenophobia and ethnocentrism in the ancient world, from the distinction between Greeks and barbarians to the Roman treatment of enemies and slaves.

The Greek word ξένος indicates the guest, but also the stranger and the foreigner. A similar semantic ambiguity is reflected also in the Latin words hostis/hospes. This conference aims to explore this ambiguity, investigating how the ancient world conceptualized the treatment of strangers and foreigners, between the two opposite poles of hospitality and xenophobia. How were strangers and foreigners considered? What were the religious and political implications of welcoming/rejecting a stranger? How was hospitality used as a diplomatic tool? How is the development of a specific Hellenic identity connected with the consideration of foreigners and barbarians? Were the Greeks and Romans xenophobic or even, in the modern sense of the word, racist? Is the modern idea of ancient hospitality just a myth?

Topics the papers might address include but are not limited to:

  • Xenia in Homeric and post-Homeric world
  • Literary and artistic representations of hospitality, supplication, xenophobia
  • Religious and political implications of hospitality and xenia
  • Philosophical conceptualization of the foreigner and the barbarian
  • Supplication and sanctuary spaces
  • Ethnicity and ethnic identity
  • Stories of ancient migrations and refugees
  • Modern reception of ancient stories of hospitality or xenophobia
  • Contemporary engagement and political use of the ancient concepts of hospitality and/or xenophobia

Please send an anonymous abstract of approximately 300 words as an email attachment by December 20, 2018. Submissions must include, in the body of the email, your name, university affiliation, and the title of the presentation. Speakers will have 15 minutes to present. Selected applicants will be notified by early January.

Questions and abstracts will be received by the conference co-chairs Elizabeth Mellen and Alessandra Migliara at cunyclassicsconference@gmail.com.

Visit our website: https://opencuny.org/cunyclassicsconference2019/

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(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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(CNN) -- Clusters of Roman skulls have been discovered deep below London's Liverpool Street by construction workers digging a new rail route through England's capital.

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View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Sun, 10/20/2013 - 11:51am by Information Architect.

Sorbonne, Paris 13th and 14th February 2014

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https://sites.google.com/site/readingromandeclamation/2014-session

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Recherche, 28 Rue Serpente, 75006 Paris (map on the website).

Speakers:
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Alessandra Rolle (Lausanne)
Julien Pingoud (Lausanne)
Jonathan Mannering (Loyola, Chicago)
Alfredo Casamento (Palermo)
Lauren Cadwell (Wesleyan University)
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Chairs:
Jean Michel David (Pantheon-Sorbonne)
Sylvie Franchet d'Esperey (Sorbonne)
Danielle van Mal Mader (Lausanne)

Organisers:
Martin Dinter (KCL/FAPESP-USP)
Charles Guerin (Montpellier and Institut universitaire de France)
Marcos Martinho (University of Sao Paulo)
Sebastien Morlet (Paris IV - Sorbonne)

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Sun, 10/20/2013 - 11:19am by .

I am happy to report that we have just received the message below from Dr. Martin Brady, Chair of the Central Council of the Classical Association of Ireland.

Denis Feeney

--------------------

Dear all,

I have just received news that proposals to close the Department of Classics in Cork and transfer its staff to the Department of History have been withdrawn. Classics maintains an independent identity at University College Cork - for now, at least. Sincere thanks for all of you who signed the petition, and for all of you who wrote to the President of UCC to make your feelings on this matter known.

best & regards,

Dr Martin Brady

View full article. | Posted in General Announcements on Mon, 10/14/2013 - 11:20am by Adam Blistein.

Dear friends, sympathizers and fellow classicists,

In 2012, the Faculty of Arts decided to gradually cut down Latin as a major subject. However, the detailed budget plan now anticipates the abandonment of all Latin courses, as well as the introductory courses of Ancient Greek and most subjects relating to classical culture. By this radical cutting off of the classical roots, the faculty loses an essential component to the understanding of western philosophy, art, history, language and literature.

By this petition, we ask the preservation in the long term of one Latin professorship at the Free University of Brussels. We are convinced that such position can serve the purpose of not only the faculty of arts, but also the entire university community.

To sign the petition click: http://www.thepetitionsite.com/557/100/788/quo-vadis-vub-zonder-latijn-free-university-of-brussels-without-latin/

"Qui tacet, consentire videtur".

View full article. | Posted in General Announcements on Tue, 10/08/2013 - 5:39am by .

Steven Perkins, Latin teacher since 1998 at North Central High School in Indianapolis, has been named Teacher of the Year by the Indianapolis Department of Education.

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The following members were chosen in the elections held this Summer. They take office on January 5, 2014, except for the two new members of the Nominating Committee who take office immediately.

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"Twitter’s 140-character epigraphs and aphorisms are ideal for Latin: five words can often say more than ten English ones, notes David Butterfield, a Latinist at the University of Cambridge. Tweets also leave no room for troublesome long subordinate clauses. The Pontifex Latin account has gained 132,000 followers since Benedict XVI started it in January. It is run by the Vatican’s Office of Latin Letters—perhaps the only modern workplace where the language of Virgil is still the lingua franca."

Read more…

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Mon, 09/30/2013 - 9:42pm by Information Architect.

The Department of Classics at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, with the support of the UMass College of Humanities and Fine Arts and the Departments of Classics of Amherst College, Mt. Holyoke College, and Smith College, will host a one-day colloquium on the theme "Speaking of the Republic: Lucilius and his Contexts," Friday, October 25, 2013. Speakers are Anna Chahoud (Trinity College Dublin), "Colloquial Registers and Generic Stylization in Lucilius"; Sander Goldberg (UCLA), "Lucilius and the poetarum seniorum turba"; Angelo Mercado (Grinnell College), "Notes on Meter and Language in Lucilius"; and Brian Breed (UMass Amherst), "Lucilius' Books."

The full conference program can be viewed at http://umass.academia.edu/BrianWBreed/Events.

A registration fee of $20 includes lunch and refreshments. Dinner is also available for an additional cost.

To register or with any questions, please contact the organizers: Brian Breed (bbreed@classics.umass.edu) and Rex Wallace (rwallace@classics.umass.edu).

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 09/30/2013 - 9:40pm by .

At the Joint Annual Meeting in Seattle in January 2013 the Placement Committee organized a panel on nonacademic employment opportunities for Ph.D.s in Classics and Archaeology.  Follow this link (https://placement.apaclassics.org/alternative-employment) to read about the panel, hear audio clips of the presentations, and see a list of resources discussed at the panel.

We are very grateful to Committee Chair, David Potter, and his colleagues Betsey Robinson and Mike Lippman for their work in organizing this session.  Thanks are also due to the seven speakers who gave us permission to offer their talks online.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 09/30/2013 - 9:12pm by .

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