CFP: (In)equity and Marginalization in Ancient Mediterranean Studies

Now and Then: (In)equity and Marginalization in Ancient Mediterranean Studies

March 12th and 13th, 2021 (via Zoom)

The First Biennial Bryn Mawr College SPEAC Conference for Undergraduate and Graduate Research

Deadline for submission: December 1st, 2020

Bryn Mawr College’s new group SPEAC (Students Promoting Equity in Archaeology and Classics) is happy to announce our first biennial research conference, to be held virtually. As a group, we are dedicated to amplifying the voices of academically marginalized and underrepresented communities (including, but not limited to, BIPOC, FGLI, disabled, and LGBTQ+ scholars) in the fields of Greek, Latin, Classical Studies, Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology, and Ancient Mediterranean Studies. For this conference, we are seeking research from undergraduate and graduate students, as well as unaffiliated and unfunded early-career scholars, that centers around topics of racism, white supremacy, race, identity, gender, justice, and inequity in both the ancient world and the modern disciplines that study it. As this is our inaugural conference, we are keeping the theme deliberately expansive; our idea is that future years will have more nuanced themes.

The fields of Classics, Archaeology, and Ancient Mediterranean Studies can not ignore the racist and white supremacist underpinnings of our disciplines, and we as young and/or early-career scholars have an ethical obligation to interrogate and address the ways in which our fields have benefited from and perpetuated inequity and elitism. Problems of racism, sexism, ableism, and homophobia are nowhere near new to our disciplines, and this summer’s protests and calls for accountability and reform spurred largely by the murder of George Floyd (as just one victim in a long history of systemic racism) have highlighted the importance of meaningfully addressing Classics’ complicity in these structures. Academia does not have the privilege of operating within a vacuum, so it is incumbent upon us to understand how to make our work socially and politically relevant. We must examine our field’s relationship with frameworks rooted in injustice as well as such issues in the ancient world to fully understand how to utilize our studies for real good. This conference is aimed at working toward these ideals and amplifying the many voices already engaging in these discussions.

Potential paper topics include:

  • Conceptions of identity (race, ethnicity, class, and/or gender) in the ancient Mediterranean and Near East
  • Conceptions of status (inequality, marginalization, immigration, and outcasts) in the ancient Mediterranean and Near East
  • Problems inherent to the term “Classics” and periodization as a whole
  • Marginalization and white supremacy in the historiography of our disciplines
  • Disability studies in the ancient world and/or in the modern fields of Classics, Archaeology, and Ancient Mediterranean Studies
  • Reception—whether that’s a white supremacist group interpreting a historiographical text to support their racist ideology, or a Black filmmaker interpreting a Greek tragedy as an act of political resistance—we want to talk about both the destructive and constructive potentials of reception and reception theory
  • Methods for using work in these fields for social justice purposes
  • Anti-racist work in the classroom, publishing, etc.
  • Current racism and inequity in our fields

This list is by no means exhaustive, and we are very open to highlighting a wide variety of topics. We are hoping to have 2 panels on the first day focusing on the ancient world, followed by a keynote speaker; then the second day will feature 2 panels focusing on the modern field, followed by a summative roundtable discussion. This obviously depends on the submissions we receive, but our goal is a relatively even distribution of work focusing on the ancient world and the modern. Papers should be around 15 minutes in length.

Please fill out this form to submit your 300-word abstract. Feel free to email brynmawrspeac@gmail.com with any questions or concerns. Abstracts are due by December 1st and we aim to get back to applicants by the middle of January.

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(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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Sex, Rage, & Change:Feminist Adaptation of Ovid’s Metamorphoses

a public conversation with Nina MacLaughlin, Paisley Rekdal, and Stephanie McCarter

4 p.m. CST Thursday, April 8, 2021

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Tue, 03/09/2021 - 1:39pm by Erik Shell.

Society for Ancient Mediterranean Religions

SPRING LECTURE SERIES 2021

Après le deluge: plagues, propaganda, and the mobility of the divine

Please join SAMR members in a lecture series this Spring devoted to the exploration of ancient ritual responses to questions that have filled our minds, hearts and news feeds over an extraordinary year. Four speakers have will explore contemporary issues, including disease, identity, mobility and disempowered cultural groups through the lenses of ancient ritual practice.  All are welcome -mark your calendars!

All sessions will be held at this Zoom address: https://pugetsound-edu.zoom.us/j/93329292263

March 11, at 12 noon EST

“Osor-Hapi: North African Cult Paradigms during the Hellenistic and Roman Periods.”

Dr. Vivian A. Laughlin

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 03/01/2021 - 11:49am by Erik Shell.

The second iteration of the conference, Res Difficiles 2.0 Difficult Conversations in Classics (ResDiff2), will be held March 20, 2021; registration is now

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 03/01/2021 - 11:46am by Erik Shell.

The Perception of Climate and Nature in Ancient Societies

International Online Conference

14th  May 2021

Organised by  Classical Students Association of the John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin

Call for Papers

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 03/01/2021 - 11:43am by Erik Shell.
Goddess Demeter and her daughter Persephone give grain to Triptolemos and teach him the art of agriculture. Marble Relief from Eleusis. ca. 430 BCE. Roman copy. ca. 27 BCE – 14 CE. Photo courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

The Classics Everywhere initiative, launched by the SCS in 2019, supports projects that seek to engage communities worldwide with the study of Greek and Roman antiquity in new and meaningful ways. Most of the projects funded take place in the US and Canada, though the initiative is growing and has funded projects in the UK, Italy, Greece, Belgium, Ghana, and Puerto Rico. This post highlights projects that foster engagement and education for school-aged children and young adults from California to Canada, Chicago to New York.

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 02/26/2021 - 9:15am by .

The Executive Committee of the SCS has issued the following statement:

For several years, serious issues have arisen concerning online communications within the classics community. The SCS reminds its members to respect the dignity of one another in professional and private communications. These communications include, inter alia, social media posts and direct messages, private emails, and messages posted to email listservs. In view of these concerns the SCS Professional Matters Division is preparing guidelines for social media and other online communications.

Approved 2/25/2021

View full article. | Posted in Public Statements on Thu, 02/25/2021 - 4:44pm by Helen Cullyer.

Summer 2021 Election Slate

The 2020-2021 SCS Nominating Committee, co-chaired by Laurel Fulkerson and Celia Schultz, has worked hard through the late Fall 2020 and early 2021. The Committee is pleased to present the following slate of candidates for election in Summer 2021. All candidates listed below have agreed to stand. SCS will publish candidate statements in the late spring or early summer and online voting will begin as usual on or around August 1.

President-Elect (one to be elected)

Lesley Dean-Jones

Matthew Roller 

Financial Trustee (one to be elected)

Daniel Berman

Joseph Farrell

Vice President for Education (one to be elected)

Dani Bostick

Teresa Ramsby

Directors (two to be elected)

(one candidate, Yurie Hong, has withdrawn)

Young Richard Kim

Nandini Pandey

Bronwen Wickkiser

Craig Williams

Nominating Committee (two to be elected)

Ronnie Ancona

Pramit Chaudhuri

Joel Christensen

Akira Yatsuhashi

Program Committee (one to be elected)

Rosa Andújar

Denise Demetriou

Goodwin Committee (two to be elected)

Rhiannon Ash

Constanze Guthenke

Yopie Prins

Phiroze Vasunia 

Committee on Professional Ethics (two to be elected)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 02/22/2021 - 1:45pm by Erik Shell.
Banner of the Women's Classical Caucus, est. 1972

In Part 2 of our guest series for the SCS Blog, the Women’s Classical Caucus (WCC) invites you to celebrate the winner of its 2020–2021 Leadership Award: Suzanne Lye, Assistant Professor of Classics at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The award recognizes Dr. Lye’s extraordinary leadership and initiative in establishing, administering, and fundraising for the SCS-WCC Covid-19 Relief Fund. Since April 2020, this emergency microgrant fund has distributed no-strings-attached awards of up to $500 to North American classicists in need.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 02/22/2021 - 10:27am by Caroline Cheung.
Gaius Gracchus addressing the plebeians. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

If there’s one thing in this divided America that we can all agree on, it’s that former president Donald J. Trump’s impeachment lawyer Bruce Castor was pretty crappy.

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 02/18/2021 - 10:35am by Serena S Witzke.

The Classics Department at UNC-Chapel Hill is sad to announce that Philip A. Stadter died last week at the age of 84 in North Carolina. In over forty years of teaching at UNC, and in almost twenty years of a very active retirement, Philip wrote influential books and articles about Plutarch, Arrian, Thucydides and other authors, and his friendships and mentoring and collaborations extended around the world. There is an obituary online, with information about a service Tuesday 2/16 at 2:30 Eastern time that will have an online component, at https://www.legacy.com/obituaries/newsobserver/obituary.aspx?n=philip-stadter&pid=197767979.

A longer statement from the Department about his life and work is forthcoming.

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Wed, 02/17/2021 - 1:34pm by Erik Shell.

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