CFP: International Association for Presocratic Studies

International Association for Presocratic Studies
Seventh Biennial Conference: 15-19 July 2020

Belo Horizonte, Brazil: Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais
Chair of Organizing Committee: Miriam Peixoto
 
The International Association for Presocratic Studies (IAPS, founded in 2008: https://www.presocraticstudies.org) announces its Seventh Biennial Conference. The meeting will take place at the Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil 15-19 June 2020 (http://www.ufmg.br). 
IAPS understands “Presocratics” to be the figures for whom either fragments of their work or relevant testimonia are collected in Hermann Diels’ Die Fragmente der Vorsokratiker (6th edn. 1951, edited by Walther Kranz). IAPS welcomes presentations on philosophical, philological, textual, doxographical, scientific, historical, literary and religious topics having to do with the Presocratics, on connections between Presocratic thought and other figures (e.g., the Sophists) and other areas of intellectual activity (e.g., mathematics, medicine or music), and on the reception of Presocratic thought in antiquity and later times. 
IAPS welcomes participation from scholars at all stages of their careers, from graduate students to senior figures in the field.
To receive further information about the conference, please send a message with the title “IAPS 7” to Prof. Miriam Peixoto <presocraticstudies@gmail.com>
Information about the venue can be found at our site: http://www.presocraticstudies.org  
 
Call for abstracts

 
Two-page proposals for papers, in the form of abstracts (maximum 300 words) should be sent in PDF format to: 
presocraticstudies@gmail.com
The title line of the message should be “IAPS 7 Proposal”
The first page of the proposal should be a cover page containing the following information:
Author’s name (as you would like it to appear in the program)
Author’s institution
Author’s title or position (e.g., Graduate Student, Independent Scholar, Associate Professor)
Author’s City/Country
Title of Paper
Author’s e-mail address
Modalities of session: 
(   ) Longer Plenary (30' for presentation; 15' for discussion)
(   ) Short Plenary (20' for presentation; 10' for discussion)             
(   ) Discussion session (45' for discussion)
 
The second page should contain the abstract and the title of paper, in any of these languages: English, French, Germany, Italian, Portuguese or Spanish.
To ensure anonymity in the refereeing process, do not put your name on this page.
Authors of proposals are asked to observe two deadlines:
(i)    Submission of abstracts: December 15, 2019.
(ii)   Submission of full copy of paper (after acceptance of proposal), May 15, 2020
Submitted abstracts will be reviewed by a program committee appointed by the Council of IAPS. The decision of the program committee will be communicated via e-mail to authors of abstracts not later than 31 January 2020. Authors whose proposals have been accepted will receive an official invitation to present a paper at the conference. 
 
• Papers may be written in English, French, German, Italian, Portuguese or Spanish. 
• For papers written in languages other than English, it is recommended that a full English version be prepared by the author in time for distribution to the audience at the conference. 
• If the paper contains untransliterated Greek, a Unicode font should be used. 
• Maximum length of the full copy of the paper is 3,000 words, exclusive of footnotes and bibliography.
 
Conference Fee

 
Payment of a fee will be required for those who attend the conference. The exact amount will be determined instead of defined.
 
Presentation of Papers
 
In accordance with the established practice of IAPS, there will be two kinds of sessions: plenary sessions and discussion sessions. 
 
Plenary sessions will conform to the usual practice for conferences: authors will read their papers, and there will be a brief period for questions and answers:  
Shortest plenary session: 20 minutes to the reading of each paper and 10 minutes to discussion;
Longer plenary session: 30 minutes to the reading of each paper and 15 minutes to discussion.
 
The discussion sessions will take place in open areas at the conference center. At each session each of the presenters will sit in an assigned place, where his/her abstract has been posted, and discuss his/her paper with whoever comes to talk about it. The audience will be free to come and go as they wish, to discuss with as many or as few of the presenters as they wish, and to spend as much time as they wish with each presenter. The discussion sessions are intended for authors who prefer more extensive discussion of their work and/or for topics that would be most fruitfully discussed in such a setting. Proposals for collaborative presentations are welcome. Discussion sessions will be the duration of one or two hours.
 
At the time of submission of abstracts, authors will be given the opportunity to express their preference for presenting at either a plenary session or a discussion session. While taking such preference into account, the IAPS program committee will have the final say on assignment of the accepted presentation to either type of venue.

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(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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Call for Papers:

Horror vacui: Fear of Space in the Ancient World

Biennial Classics Graduate Student Conference

Conducted virtually via Zoom

New York University

November 5th, 2021

Keynote: Amy Russell (Brown University)

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 09/20/2021 - 4:18pm by Erik Shell.
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One of the things that makes Classics exciting is its openness to new ideas and innovative approaches to the study of antiquity. For instance, classicists have been in the vanguard of the digital humanities, using new methods to curate and analyze texts (e.g. TLG, DLL, Open Greek and Latin, and so on), inscriptions (EAGLE, PHI), and papyri (papyri.info), adopting innovative GIS technologies and platforms (Pleiades, Orbis), and deploying powerful tools to unlock precious fragments of lost works. Classical archaeologists, too, have a particularly strong tradition of openness to new tools and techniques, from isotope geochemistry in the study of ancient marble to novel ways of cataloguing and quantifying material and visualizing ancient structures and sites. Vibrant subfields like bioarchaeology and zooarchaeology are inherently interdisciplinary. More broadly, ideas and approaches informed by anthropology, economics, and psychology have enriched the study of antiquity for decades.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 09/20/2021 - 12:54pm by .

Res Difficiles 2022

Organizers:              Hannah Čulík-Baird (Boston University) and

Joseph Romero (University of Mary Washington)

Date:                          Friday, May 20, 2022

Abstract Deadline:  Friday, January 3, 2021

Platform:                    Webinar

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 09/20/2021 - 12:24pm by Erik Shell.
A black krater vase with red-figure depicts Zeus caressing Io while Hermes slays Argus

The Ancient Worlds, Modern Communities initiative (AnWoMoCo), launched by the SCS in 2019 as the Classics Everywhere initiative, supports projects that seek to engage broader publics — individuals, groups, and communities — in critical discussion of and creative expression related to the ancient Mediterranean, the global reception of Greek and Roman culture, and the history of teaching and scholarship in the field of classical studies. As part of this initiative, the SCS has funded 111 projects, ranging from school programming to reading groups, prison programs, public talks and conferences, digital projects, and collaborations with artists in theater, opera, music, dance, and the visual arts. The initiative welcomes applications from all over the world. To date, it has funded projects in 25 states and 11 countries, including Canada, UK, Italy, Greece, Spain, Belgium, Ghana, Puerto Rico, Argentina, and India.

This post centers on two projects that employ Greek and Roman literature in innovative ways to deal with contemporary issues. The first project draws inspiration from Euripides’ Trojan Women to facilitate the expression and sharing of intense experiences between students in the University of California and female prisoners, while the second project adapts Ovid’s Metamorphoses in a one-woman show that explores the role of women in our post #MeToo era.

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 09/16/2021 - 11:35am by .

QUEEN: REIMAGINING POWER FROM ANTIQUITY TO THE PRESENT

A virtual symposium hosted by the Gallatin School of Individualize Study

Ancient queens established a powerful public presence through visual and material culture, and their legacies continue to shape and impact the ways we express ideas about race, gender, and identity.

QUEEN: REIMAGINING POWER FROM ANTIQUITY TO THE PRESENT is an interdisciplinary, virtual symposium hosted by NYU Gallatin on September 23-24, 2021. This symposium integrates scholarly and creative knowledge production from different perspectives that broaden the stakes and widen the impact of historical work. The symposium will model collaborative, critical, and public approaches to history and art by including the expertise of students, artists, performers, and educators beyond the university alongside the work of scholars and curators. Spanning two days, the symposium comprises seven panel discussions, five keynote talks, one performance, and an interactive website featuring public engagement, student work, and more.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Wed, 09/15/2021 - 12:03pm by Erik Shell.

Multiple Explanations in the Ancient Greek and Roman World

Virtual seminar series, 2021-2022

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Wed, 09/15/2021 - 10:19am by Erik Shell.

Call for Papers: 

XR and the Humanities: Virtual Education in the 21st Century

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 09/15/2021 - 9:16am by Erik Shell.

“What Has Antiquity Ever Done for Us?” The Vitality of Ancient Reception Studies, Now

An international virtual conference presented by Antiquity in Media Studies (AIMS)

15-18 December 2021

Deadline for submissions: 15 October 2021

The officers of Antiquity in Media Studies invite proposals for presentations that illuminate the ongoing vitality of antiquity in recent discourses. Despite decades of institutional disinvestment in the study of antiquity, a venerated deep past figured as a powerful shared imaginary remains a perennial, emotionally evocative, even highly lucrative concept in myriad contemporary media, around the world and across all manner of identity lines. Among antiquities, of particularly widespread interest has been the millennia of history centered on the Mediterranean and dubbed “classical” among successor societies, both self-appointed and colonized. From Ubisoft’s Assassin’s Creed Odyssey to Luis Alfaro’s Mojada, from Hideki Takeuchi’s Thermae Romae to Pat Barker’s Silence of the Girls, to politicians' and pundits' invocations of the Persian Wars and the fall of Rome, each year produces more receptions of this antiquity. Beyond the Greco-Roman-centered past, all antiquities mobilized for such cultural work today are welcome at this ancient reception studies conference. 

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 09/14/2021 - 11:30am by Erik Shell.

(Published on behalf of Werner Reiß)

Dear colleagues,

It is with great pleasure that Professor Werner Riess and his team announce the launch of the new database TheDefix (Thesaurus Defixionum), which replaces the earlier version TheDeMa (Thesaurus Defixionum Magdeburgensis). TheDefix is an open access Heurist database hosted by the University of Hamburg, Department of Ancient History, and can be reached at the following link:

www.thedefix.uni-hamburg.de.

As its predecessor TheDeMa, TheDefix seeks to collect all published curse inscriptions from the ancient world, providing the original texts, data on their material textual features as well as bibliographical information on each tablet.
Users are welcome to contact us if they need any support in the usage of the database or to suggest any improvement at the following addresses:

Prof. Dr. Werner Rieß: werner.riess@uni-hamburg.de
Dr. Sara Chiarini: sara.chiarini@uni-hamburg.de

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Tue, 09/14/2021 - 11:28am by Erik Shell.
NEH Logo

August, 2021

Below is a list of the most recent NEH grantees and their Classically-themed projects. The NEH helps fund a number of SCS initiatives, and their support affects the field of Classics at a national and local level.

Grantees

  • Julie Montione (Valencia College) - "Timeless Parallels: Classical Literature and Veteran Experiences"
  • Lauren Ristvet (University of Pennsylvania) - "Eastern Mediterranean Gallery"
  • Clifford Ando (University of Chicago) - "Roman Statutes: Renewing Roman Law"
View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Mon, 09/13/2021 - 1:35pm by Erik Shell.

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